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    (Original post by JenniS)
    could someone please explain Rossby waves to me?? thanks
    Each large meander, or wave, within the jet stream is known as a Rossby wave.
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    (Original post by Axion)
    Each large meander, or wave, within the jet stream is known as a Rossby wave.
    is that literally all you need to know? haha
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    (Original post by JenniS)
    could someone please explain Rossby waves to me?? thanks
    rossby waves and the jet stream follow the same path above the earth's surface. It is believed that they are caused by the rocky mountains in the northern hemisphere and i can't remember what causes them in the southern hemisphere. They are streams of extremely fast moving air and follow a sinusoidal path with 5-7 peaks and troughs.

    At a peak, the air is closer to the pole and this causes it to cool down and become more dense. This means there is less room for the air to move and so on the descending arm of the wave, the air descends to the earth's surface, causing high pressure.

    At a trough, the air is closer to the equator and so warms up and the air particles become less dense. This means there is more room in the stream, so on the ascending arm of the wave, air on the surface ascends to the wave, creating low pressure on the ground.

    My teacher said to imagine a traffic jam on the motorway, when the cars are densely packed, you're more likely to get cars leaving the motorway to avoid the traffic (air leaves the stream like the cars leave the motorway). But when the traffic clears up and is less densely packed, cars are more likely to join the motorway (air joins the stream when it is less densely packed with air)

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by niamh067)
    rossby waves and the jet stream follow the same path above the earth's surface. It is believed that they are caused by the rocky mountains in the northern hemisphere and i can't remember what causes them in the southern hemisphere. They are streams of extremely fast moving air and follow a sinusoidal path with 5-7 peaks and troughs.

    At a peak, the air is closer to the pole and this causes it to cool down and become more dense. This means there is less room for the air to move and so on the descending arm of the wave, the air descends to the earth's surface, causing high pressure.

    At a trough, the air is closer to the equator and so warms up and the air particles become less dense. This means there is more room in the stream, so on the ascending arm of the wave, air on the surface ascends to the wave, creating low pressure on the ground.

    My teacher said to imagine a traffic jam on the motorway, when the cars are densely packed, you're more likely to get cars leaving the motorway to avoid the traffic (air leaves the stream like the cars leave the motorway). But when the traffic clears up and is less densely packed, cars are more likely to join the motorway (air joins the stream when it is less densely packed with air)

    Hope this helps
    that is good stuff!!! pretty sure my teacher missed out this, like the little traffic explanation
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    Anyone else finding the weather outside (or weather & Climate!) seriously demoralising?
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    Does anyone know if we need a case study for the characteristics and issues of countries and very low economic development? for development and globalisation?
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    I've got 11 world cities case studies, does that sound about right?
    Would someone who is doing G&D mind listing the case studies for that? The topic was really rushed in class


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    (Original post by A Wise Ninja)
    I've got 11 world cities case studies, does that sound about right?
    Would someone who is doing G&D mind listing the case studies for that? The topic was really rushed in class


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    Yep but how many do you know lol :P I know maybe 1 out of the 18 i've set myself
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    I have 24 case studies all together, some smaller, some bigger.

    you don't need to know exact facts, you won't be downgraded! as long as you are about right...

    you can say for example: "the economic implications were also considerable, over $1million were needed to fund towards homeless shelters" etc etc...

    :P
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    How much do you guys usually write for the 40 marker?
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    Urgh I actually feel sick with how much there is to know for this exam! Hate Redfurn ha
    Im espicially worried because Unit1 was so hard for alot of people he'll try and catch us out too ..

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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    I have 24 case studies all together, some smaller, some bigger.

    you don't need to know exact facts, you won't be downgraded! as long as you are about right...

    you can say for example: "the economic implications were also considerable, over $1million were needed to fund towards homeless shelters" etc etc...

    :P
    I don't even know the basics!! When is your first exam?
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    (Original post by Axion)
    I don't even know the basics!! When is your first exam?

    I have my history exam next monday! arghhh....

    what about you mate?
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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Urgh I actually feel sick with how much there is to know for this exam! Hate Redfurn ha
    Im espicially worried because Unit1 was so hard for alot of people he'll try and catch us out too ..

    Posted from TSR Mobile

    no, I don't think they will try and catch us out - I was looking through previous questions, and the only thing that will catch people out is the wording of questions :rolleyes: I'm sure you will be fine!

    and if we find a question tricky, It is more than likely the rest of us will and the UMS will be altered otherwise!

    and for the 40 markers, the questions are open ended anyway, so it's your interpretation!
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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    I have my history exam next monday! arghhh....

    what about you mate?
    Next Tuesday. So do you have tuesday wednesday and thursday all off?!?
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    (Original post by Axion)
    Next Tuesday. So do you have tuesday wednesday and thursday all off?!?

    all those days I have off !! so it will be solid cramming to be honest! then I have to wait to weeks for my music exam....grrr
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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    all those days I have off !! so it will be solid cramming to be honest! then I have to wait to weeks for my music exam....grrr
    I only have wednesday and thursday off :[
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    My first exam is Computing on Monday, but I feel much more prepared for geography thanks to this thread!


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    Anyone here doing maths a level?


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    Anyone got any predictions for weather short answer questions and globalisation


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