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    (Original post by Axion)
    Am I the only one finding it really difficult to learn the sheer amount of info there is ?

    really struggling
    What grade you hoping for in this exam, Axion?
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    (Original post by abismall)
    I'm learning Serengeti, the Amazon and the Arctic! There's loads of stuff on the Internet/ in textbooks etc


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    I only learnt one since im not going to do the ecoysystem 40 marker and thats on the Amazon rainforest, i doubt they will ask you to compare to different fragile enviroments (effects and managment) for a 10 marker cause theirs too much too write about
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    (Original post by jacktomos95)
    Ok basically the model shows the atmospheric circulation so how is wind transferred and why is low pressure and high pressure received at different areas. At the equator where the north east and south east trade winds meet also called the ITCZ and the doldrums we find areas of low pressure. This is because the sun is lower in the sky and the sun heat up the area more as radiation is concentrated. This causes more convectional uplift, leaving behind areas of low pressure. As this air rises it moves to the poles where it becomes more dense(don't need to know reasons why). As it becomes more dense it sinks as it can hold more moisture. This leaves high pressure at the poles. At the poles we have polar cells which simulate high pressure systems. This is also called the Polar High. At the equator we have the Hadley cell with rising low pressure. This is also called a zone of Equatorial low.

    Regarding winds, they move across areas depending on the deflection of Coriolis. In the northern hemisphere winds are deflected to the right and in the southern to the left. This also creates surface winds called trade winds. The most common winds the UK face are the south westerlies.

    Hope this helps


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    So are trade winds the same as prevailing winds?

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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    So are trade winds the same as prevailing winds?

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    Yes they are


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    (Original post by A Wise Ninja)
    What grade you hoping for in this exam, Axion?
    B :/
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    (Original post by Khushaali)
    Ecosystems: what are everyones case studies for fragile environments? Are they tropical biomes or the Gulf of Mexico stuff? Or both?
    quite confused as to what a fragile environment is!
    The case study i got for a fragile environment is the Amazon Forest but you could also do the Serengeti

    Fragile environments are ecosystems that are easily disturbed and can't adapt to change e.g. coral reefs, coastal wetlands, polar enviroments, savanna grasslands and tropical rainforests. They are easily damaged by changes brought about by human activities e.g. deforestation and overexploitation. Changes in the natural environment also affect fragile environments e.g. floods and droughts. Small changes can cause a lot of damage and once a fragile environment is damaged, it is extremely difficult to repair.

    Hope that help!
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    (Original post by jacktomos95)
    Ok basically the model shows the atmospheric circulation so how is wind transferred and why is low pressure and high pressure received at different areas. At the equator where the north east and south east trade winds meet also called the ITCZ and the doldrums we find areas of low pressure. This is because the sun is lower in the sky and the sun heat up the area more as radiation is concentrated. This causes more convectional uplift, leaving behind areas of low pressure. As this air rises it moves to the poles where it becomes more dense(don't need to know reasons why). As it becomes more dense it sinks as it can hold more moisture. This leaves high pressure at the poles. At the poles we have polar cells which simulate high pressure systems. This is also called the Polar High. At the equator we have the Hadley cell with rising low pressure. This is also called a zone of Equatorial low.

    Regarding winds, they move across areas depending on the deflection of Coriolis. In the northern hemisphere winds are deflected to the right and in the southern to the left. This also creates surface winds called trade winds. The most common winds the UK face are the south westerlies.

    Hope this helps


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    Thank you very much
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    do we have to know about supervolcanoes for tectonics?
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    (Original post by Axion)
    B :/
    In my personal opinion, I think you should focus on one topic that you decide you want to do the 40 marker, and then if you have learned it all in depth then nothing should trick you out and you'll have such a good knowledge of the topic you can make all sorts of synoptic links!

    I'm doing this for world cities, I have pretty good case studies of the whole topic and a decent overall knowledge- then the other two topics (tectonics and D&G) i'll learn more theory than in-depth case studies.
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    (Original post by Gary)
    The case study i got for a fragile environment is the Amazon Forest but you could also do the Serengeti

    Fragile environments are ecosystems that are easily disturbed and can't adapt to change e.g. coral reefs, coastal wetlands, polar enviroments, savanna grasslands and tropical rainforests. They are easily damaged by changes brought about by human activities e.g. deforestation and overexploitation. Changes in the natural environment also affect fragile environments e.g. floods and droughts. Small changes can cause a lot of damage and once a fragile environment is damaged, it is extremely difficult to repair.

    Hope that help!
    you're supposed to do two contrasting fragile environments? or is it 1?

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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    you're supposed to do two contrasting fragile environments? or is it 1?

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    Well your supposed to do 2 but I'm only doing 1 cause I doubt they will ask you to compare two fragile environments and their management schemes for a 10 marker since theirs a lot to write about


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    (Original post by A Wise Ninja)
    In my personal opinion, I think you should focus on one topic that you decide you want to do the 40 marker, and then if you have learned it all in depth then nothing should trick you out and you'll have such a good knowledge of the topic you can make all sorts of synoptic links!

    I'm doing this for world cities, I have pretty good case studies of the whole topic and a decent overall knowledge- then the other two topics (tectonics and D&G) i'll learn more theory than in-depth case studies.
    It's more the wording of some essays that put me off, regardless of the topic
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    I have a friend who genuinely believes this and will talk about it in a question about the structure of the earth:
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    (Original post by A Wise Ninja)
    In my personal opinion, I think you should focus on one topic that you decide you want to do the 40 marker, and then if you have learned it all in depth then nothing should trick you out and you'll have such a good knowledge of the topic you can make all sorts of synoptic links!

    I'm doing this for world cities, I have pretty good case studies of the whole topic and a decent overall knowledge- then the other two topics (tectonics and D&G) i'll learn more theory than in-depth case studies.
    That's what I'm doing as well. How long do you generally spend on the 40 marker?
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    (Original post by St. Brynjar)
    I have a friend who genuinely believes this and will talk about it in a question about the structure of the earth:
    I hope he's ready to get a U! :lol:
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    (Original post by Axion)
    Am I the only one finding it really difficult to learn the sheer amount of info there is ?

    really struggling
    I'm struggling too and I need an A! I go over stuff until i'm confident with it, but then i go back to it and cant remember as much detail as i did before! Hopefully it will all come back to me in exam conditions.
    I am leaving unit 4B revision till after the unit 3 exam as its too much work otherwise!
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    for anyone who does conflict, does anyone know anything about migration models, my mate just mentioned it to me asking if we need to know it and i have never heard of it
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    (Original post by A Wise Ninja)
    I hope he's ready to get a U! :lol:
    'Explain the structure of the earth - 10 marks' Well the inner earth people who are harbouring the Nazis...
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    (Original post by SamEastie)
    do we have to know about supervolcanoes for tectonics?
    anyone know?
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    (Original post by SamEastie)
    anyone know?
    Never thought of this, I don't think we need to and it's not in the specification either but I guess if your doing a tectonic essay question you can put it in to show synopticity?


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