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    For ecosystems, the spec says to know "The relationships between human activity, biodiversity and sustainability."

    All i can think of is human acticvity e.g. deforestation, reduces biodiversity e.g. trees and therefore isn't sustainable, is there anything more to it?
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    (Original post by niamh067)
    For ecosystems, the spec says to know "The relationships between human activity, biodiversity and sustainability."

    All i can think of is human acticvity e.g. deforestation, reduces biodiversity e.g. trees and therefore isn't sustainable, is there anything more to it?
    Its not just deforestation but it is the main threat to tropical rainforests though!
    Theres other factors like overhunting and poaching and climate change and explain how these activities influence biodiversity
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    (Original post by wrnicholls)
    How many topics have you all learnt? We've covered 4. But I may just learn the 3 needed.
    I've only been taught 3! Had I been taught 4, I would probably have focused on 3.

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    (Original post by GLOB)
    Does anyone know what we are supposed to learn for the growth in the 21st century part of D&G (I'm teaching myself this topic so I have no notes on it) and I can't find it in the AQA book


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    Mainly that Manufacturing has moved to NICs and R & D is happening in MEDCs however, the mature NICs and upcoming NICs such as China are starting to be more global and investing elsewhere.
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    Could someone please explain to me what solfatera and mud volcanoes are under minor extrusive activity?

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    In the textbook in world cities, are Mumbai and Bangalore two different case studies, the first about urbanisation and the second about planning?


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    Has everyone covered all their units? I havent and im really stressing out!
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    (Original post by GraceCatherine_94)
    I am :-)


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Do you have any ideas on what the short answer or long answer questions could be on?
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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Could someone please explain to me what solfatera and mud volcanoes are under minor extrusive activity?

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    Solfatara are small volcanic areas without cones, produced by gases, mainly sulphurous, escaping to the surface, eg around bay of naples in italy. The superheated water turns to steam as it condenses on the surface by mud volcanoes do you mean the minor volcanic form as in hot springs and boiling mud? or more like lahars?
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    (Original post by Munny-Gill)
    Has everyone covered all their units? I havent and im really stressing out!
    what do you mean covered? as in, you haven't learnt the material yet or revised over it?

    there are still bits I need to go over as I feel a bit unsure! just concentrate on the three topics you are doing and keep going over them - you have a week to really polish up on the material!
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    Really don't understand Batholiths, Sills and Dykes. Would anyone be able to explain them for me? All I understand is that batholiths are where magma chambers have cooled under rock, and then magma shoots out upwards (dykes) and sideways (sills)? Or is that completely wrong?
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    (Original post by razza41)
    Solfatara are small volcanic areas without cones, produced by gases, mainly sulphurous, escaping to the surface, eg around bay of naples in italy. The superheated water turns to steam as it condenses on the surface by mud volcanoes do you mean the minor volcanic form as in hot springs and boiling mud? or more like lahars?
    fumeroles if they don't contain sulphur ? I think its boiling mud they mean is generally a hot-spring that contains sediment...although - mud volcanoes sound fun...

    the easiest case study is the bath spa - contains 39 minerals in the hot spring and is a tourist attraction, contributes thousands towards the local economy ! or yellow stone that contains thousands of fumeroles, sulfataras, hot springs and boiling mud
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    (Original post by ArsenalBen)
    Really don't understand Batholiths, Sills and Dykes. Would anyone be able to explain them for me? All I understand is that batholiths are where magma chambers have cooled under rock, and then magma shoots out upwards (dykes) and sideways (sills)? Or is that completely wrong?
    Sounds like you understand them pretty well to me
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    (Original post by ArsenalBen)
    Really don't understand Batholiths, Sills and Dykes. Would anyone be able to explain them for me? All I understand is that batholiths are where magma chambers have cooled under rock, and then magma shoots out upwards (dykes) and sideways (sills)? Or is that completely wrong?

    Batholiths are large magma intrusions within the crust. they can be 700km2 and are characteristically dome shaped. they cool slowly to produce large crystals (composed mainly of basalt) they are later exposed by erosion - for instance you could use say Dartmoor as an example. the surrounding strata, because of the intense heat and pressure, produces a metamorphic aureole (limestone turns into marble etc...). they can change the topography of the landscape.

    dykes are vertical intrusions within the crust. they have horizontal cooling cracks. a cluster of dykes is know 'dyke swarm' (no puns intended). they are mainly composed of dolerite. examples you could use the isle of skye, scotland.

    sills are horizontal intrusions within the crust with vertical cooling cracks. again, they are composed of dolerite and can be 100s of km long. good example is the great whin sill, north england. for instance, hadrians wall was used as a defensive feature.

    sorry its kinda in bullet points but I hope this helps a little
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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    fumeroles if they don't contain sulphur ? I think its boiling mud they mean is generally a hot-spring that contains sediment...although - mud volcanoes sound fun...

    the easiest case study is the bath spa - contains 39 minerals in the hot spring and is a tourist attraction, contributes thousands towards the local economy ! or yellow stone that contains thousands of fumeroles, sulfataras, hot springs and boiling mud
    I'm about 75% of the way to knowing all the theory (loosely) so good progress made today

    However, i'm leaving all the case studies for wednesday/thursday next week. I won't be doing any more geography until tuesday night :/
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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    fumeroles if they don't contain sulphur ? I think its boiling mud they mean is generally a hot-spring that contains sediment...although - mud volcanoes sound fun...

    the easiest case study is the bath spa - contains 39 minerals in the hot spring and is a tourist attraction, contributes thousands towards the local economy ! or yellow stone that contains thousands of fumeroles, sulfataras, hot springs and boiling mud
    Do we need to know case studies for each landform minor intrusive/extrusive?

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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    Batholiths are large magma intrusions within the crust. they can be 700km2 and are characteristically dome shaped. they cool slowly to produce large crystals (composed mainly of basalt) they are later exposed by erosion - for instance you could use say Dartmoor as an example. the surrounding strata, because of the intense heat and pressure, produces a metamorphic aureole (limestone turns into marble etc...). they can change the topography of the landscape.

    dykes are vertical intrusions within the crust. they have horizontal cooling cracks. a cluster of dykes is know 'dyke swarm' (no puns intended). they are mainly composed of dolerite. examples you could use the isle of skye, scotland.

    sills are horizontal intrusions within the crust with vertical cooling cracks. again, they are composed of dolerite and can be 100s of km long. good example is the great whin sill, north england. for instance, hadrians wall was used as a defensive feature.

    sorry its kinda in bullet points but I hope this helps a little
    Not learning intrusive as they came up in jan :cool:
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    (Original post by Daniel George)
    fumeroles if they don't contain sulphur ? I think its boiling mud they mean is generally a hot-spring that contains sediment...although - mud volcanoes sound fun...

    the easiest case study is the bath spa - contains 39 minerals in the hot spring and is a tourist attraction, contributes thousands towards the local economy ! or yellow stone that contains thousands of fumeroles, sulfataras, hot springs and boiling mud
    yeah think so, i had no idea we had to know case studies for that, all i know is that there is hot springs in iceland and bath, do you need to know any more detail than that?
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    (Original post by razza41)
    Solfatara are small volcanic areas without cones, produced by gases, mainly sulphurous, escaping to the surface, eg around bay of naples in italy. The superheated water turns to steam as it condenses on the surface by mud volcanoes do you mean the minor volcanic form as in hot springs and boiling mud? or more like lahars?
    Okay thats great thanks I've no clue, it is on a mindmap that my teacher day me but I've never heard of it! I know lahars and boiling mud pools. Just not sure what a mud volcano is?

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    (Original post by razza41)
    yeah think so, i had no idea we had to know case studies for that, all i know is that there is hot springs in iceland and bath, do you need to know any more detail than that?

    the only reason why I know that was because I was waiting for the bus this morning and I found the bath spa leaflet and read it on the bus journey - and no I don't think so, as long as you can name places etc but the odd facts are good!
 
 
 
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