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    Does anyone have exams before their geography exam? I have english on monday and am unsure how much to prioritise

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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Does anyone have exams before their geography exam? I have english on monday and am unsure how much to prioritise

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    yeah i do. not revising any more on geography till wednesday :/
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    (Original post by Gary)
    After reading the question over and over again, finally noticed that it was asking whether seismic hazards mainly affect humans or the enviroment and i first i was thinking the same as you aswell, whether they are caused by human and physical factors.

    Thinking carefull, i think you actaully interpret it in 2 ways aswell? im not too sure though

    does your teacher have the mark scheme for it? if he does, you can ask him to look at it?
    No he doesn't have it I don't think. I don't think they release the mark schemes till after the june paper we are doing.
    Hopefully the mark sceme says it can be interpreted either way or both ways.
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    (Original post by Axion)
    yeah i do. not revising any more on geography till wednesday :/
    I should probably do that then and revise english till monday but I feel Geography is not as strong as English...I have been revising both since april yet I still feel like I know nothing for Geography :/
    Is 4 days enough to cram geography after my english exam? Lol

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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    I should probably do that then and revise english till monday but I feel Geography is not as strong as English...I have been revising both since april yet I still feel like I know nothing for Geography :/
    Is 4 days enough to cram geography after my english exam? Lol

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    4 days is enough
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    (Original post by niamh067)
    For world cities, does anyone know the difference between re-urbanisation, regeneration of city centre and redevelopment of the city centre?

    (and everyone seems to have large cities as their case studies for urbanisation/suburbanisation etc. do you think balla*****leworth estate and whitley bay are alright for suburbanisation and counter urbanisation?)
    I was thinking this because I have Blackburn for suburbanisation and Whalley for counter urbanisation and they are not that well known


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    (Original post by jacktomos95)
    Hi Jenni, this is how I would write the sequence for a depression including nature (formation) and origin (weather).

    A depression is a moving cell of low pressure that moves over an area. They are formed when a tropical maritime air mass meets with a polar maritime air mass. They meet at a stationary front where they do not move however an instability occurs between them. At the warm front sky's are clear with stratus clouds and fine drizzle. The pressure gradient is steady. At the cold front the cloud cover is mainly cumulo-nimbus and showers with an increasing pressure gradient. As the warm tropical maritime air mass is less dense it is forced to rise over the cold air mass. As it rise due to convectional uplift it reaches its due point where it saturates forms clouds and releases precipitation. The cold air mass is travelling faster than the warm air mass so it undercuts it and lifts the depression of the ground. It starts to spin anticlockwise in the northern hemisphere due to Coriolis force. This brings with it low thick cumulus clouds that deliver heavy rainfall and bring high wind speeds due to the increased pressure gradient. This depression moves over land until its warm air supply runs out. Depressions can bring very severe weather and bring hurricane forces that can destroy properties. The storm of 1987 was a particular devastation to the Uk and parts of France killing 14 people.

    I doubt this will come up, my teacher thinks its unlucky more to be on anticyclones and weather or air masses in UK.

    Just remember if a qs was to explain the different between a depression and anticyclone.

    Depression= low pressure, anticlockwise winds in northern hemisphere. Wet weather.

    Anticyclone=high pressure so sinking air, high moisture, sunny weather, fog, morning mist and due and temperature inversions. Clockwise winds.

    It's long but I wrote this and got 8/8 on a paper. Any more questions give me a buzz and ill try to help.


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    Could you please explain the formation of an anticyclone?
    Also, why is it different in the summer and winter?

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    For the two structured questions at the start, do we have to do one human and one physical topic?
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    (Original post by CF25)
    For the two structured questions at the start, do we have to do one human and one physical topic?
    yes
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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Could you please explain the formation of an anticyclone?
    Also, why is it different in the summer and winter?

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    formation? Isn't it just a high pressure weather system that spins clockwise and tends to have warm decending air, so no condensation/clouds etc
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    (Original post by Axion)
    formation? Isn't it just a high pressure weather system that spins clockwise and tends to have warm decending air, so no condensation/clouds etc
    So its not possible a question could come up on its formation? There is not as much to say compared to a depression
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    For planning and management issues of areas undergoing urbanisation, would you talk about Vision Mumbai etc. ?
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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    So its not possible a question could come up on its formation? There is not as much to say compared to a depression
    Hi jade, I don't think there will be a question specifically on the formation of a anticyclone. Just be prepared for the difference in weather in the summer and winter.

    This is all you would need;

    Anticyclone is an a cell of high pressure that forms as air that travels become more dense. As it becomes more dense the air starts to sink, resulting in high pressure. As the air sinks it is allowed to hold more moisture from the atmosphere. Anticyclones spin clockwise in the northern hemisphere unlike depressions which spin anticlockwise. Anticyclones bring with them distinct weather patterns in the summer and winter.

    In the summer:
    - Temperatures are around 25.C this is because of intense solar insolation. The absence of clouds makes more insolation penetrate the surface of the earth.
    -There is an absence of clouds
    -Due to intense heating during the day, in the morning you get morning dew and mist as the warm air rises to mix with cooler air
    -As the land takes less time to cool down in comparison to the sea and its oceans you get warm sea breezes to coastal regions
    -Anticyclones can deflect low pressure systems and can be called "Blockers". This sometimes results in heatwaves such as in 2003.
    -Tc (Tropical Continental) air mass as it brings warm moist air from the tropics over land. It also results in thunderstorms as the upper layers become unstable

    In the Winter:
    - Temperatures in the winter are much cooler around 5.C. This is because the sun is lower in the sky so radiation is spread over a greater area.
    - Temperature inversions occur as the upper atmosphere is warmer than the lower which causes atmospheric pollutants to get trapped. This enhances the greenhouse effect and global warming.
    -At night time temperature drops to below freezing. This is because rapid amounts of radiation are allowed to escape without clouds trapping outgoing long wave radiation into atmosphere.
    -Due to rapid amounts of heat rising at low levels radiation fog forms

    Hope this helps v



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    (Original post by jacktomos95)
    Hi jade, I don't think there will be a question specifically on the formation of a anticyclone. Just be prepared for the difference in weather in the summer and winter.

    This is all you would need;

    Anticyclone is an a cell of high pressure that forms as air that travels become more dense. As it becomes more dense the air starts to sink, resulting in high pressure. As the air sinks it is allowed to hold more moisture from the atmosphere. Anticyclones spin clockwise in the northern hemisphere unlike depressions which spin anticlockwise. Anticyclones bring with them distinct weather patterns in the summer and winter.

    In the summer:
    - Temperatures are around 25.C this is because of intense solar insolation. The absence of clouds makes more insolation penetrate the surface of the earth.
    -There is an absence of clouds
    -Due to intense heating during the day, in the morning you get morning dew and mist as the warm air rises to mix with cooler air
    -As the land takes less time to cool down in comparison to the sea and its oceans you get warm sea breezes to coastal regions
    -Anticyclones can deflect low pressure systems and can be called "Blockers". This sometimes results in heatwaves such as in 2003.
    -Tc (Tropical Continental) air mass as it brings warm moist air from the tropics over land. It also results in thunderstorms as the upper layers become unstable

    In the Winter:
    - Temperatures in the winter are much cooler around 5.C. This is because the sun is lower in the sky so radiation is spread over a greater area.
    - Temperature inversions occur as the upper atmosphere is warmer than the lower which causes atmospheric pollutants to get trapped. This enhances the greenhouse effect and global warming.
    -At night time temperature drops to below freezing. This is because rapid amounts of radiation are allowed to escape without clouds trapping outgoing long wave radiation into atmosphere.
    -Due to rapid amounts of heat rising at low levels radiation fog forms

    Hope this helps v



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    Thank you!

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    (Original post by niamh067)
    For world cities, does anyone know the difference between re-urbanisation, regeneration of city centre and redevelopment of the city centre?

    (and everyone seems to have large cities as their case studies for urbanisation/suburbanisation etc. do you think balla*****leworth estate and whitley bay are alright for suburbanisation and counter urbanisation?)
    Re-urbanisation is when people move from outside into towns and cities, either voluntarily (gentrification) or through govt. initiatives
    Regeneration is attempting to make a city more attractive, prosperous, and probably populous, as it will likely have seen much emigration when it declined
    Redevelopment of city centre I thought was more to do with retailing i.e. Touchwood in solihull, how they are responding to out of town centres
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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Does anyone have exams before their geography exam? I have english on monday and am unsure how much to prioritise

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    I've got English as well..but I feel like I know nothing for Geog so still gonna revise a bit of that today and then leave it until monday!
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    I'm not liking the volcano case studies.. they don't seem easy to compare in terms of levels of development having an impact on social, economic and environmental things, whereas the earthquake ones show clear differences!
    Genuinely do not know which ones to do to show the best comparisons.. |:
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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Does anyone have exams before their geography exam? I have english on monday and am unsure how much to prioritise

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    I have general studies in the morning of the same day and maths the day before
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    (Original post by Havanark)
    I've got English as well..but I feel like I know nothing for Geog so still gonna revise a bit of that today and then leave it until monday!
    Ha same! Feel so much better prepared for english, I feel I still know nothing for geography ha

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    (Original post by Jade10128)
    Does anyone have exams before their geography exam? I have english on monday and am unsure how much to prioritise

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    I have english on THURSDAY
 
 
 
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