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    (Original post by IlariaM)
    I'd like to know what particular topics of Physics and Maths it is more likely that I'd be asked about in an interview (especially at Imperial). I know that I should be prepared about everything is covered at A levels (and I'm already self-teaching most of it), but since I don't do A levels, it would be helpful to know what I should revise for interviews.
    You can find most A Level specifications online for the topics that are covered.

    After speaking to other people who went on the same day as me, almost anything can come up. If there are some things you really need to nail down then they are probably basic mechanics (M1 and M2), AS Maths (probably almost all of it except something like coordinate geometry (which is obviously less relevant)) and the fundamentals of physics (such as basic thermodynamics, electromagnetism, etc).

    Obviously, some topics form a better basis for interview questions than others. But I would really emphasise that whilst you'll be expected to know the basics (SUVAT, conversation laws, momentum, Newton's laws, heat flow, pressure, basic graph sketching, Kirchhoff's laws, rearranging algebra, etc.) you won't be pulled up on for a lack of knowledge in more specific areas (e.g. not knowing the Bernoulli equation). The interview is meant to test your physics/ maths ability to apply your knowledge to unfamiliar situations. And you aren't meant to know everything, but you are meant to show that you can apply what you do know to a situation, learn fast, pick up things, take a few hints, etc. to get to the right answer. The interview is more of a discussion about a question than it is just "answer this".

    Also if you are going to mention a specific area of physics on your personal Statement, then be prepared to cover it. e.g. If you said "I like relativity and I've read XXX book" then definitely be prepared to talk about it for a few minutes.
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    (Original post by frankdatank)
    Hi, I'm in year 12 and just finishing AS exams. I am thinking about Physics and Physics and Philosophy as possible uni courses.
    You mentioned you were considering doing Pys and Phil at one point - what decided between the two for you?
    Thanks
    Sorry people who asked questions, sort of forgot to log in for about 2 months.

    In response to why I didn't choose PhysPhil, it was more a practical thing. Although obviously they cover common ground in a sense, they require two different skill sets. When it comes to exams, although a physphil does the same number of modules as pure physics, revision from one physics module (say, mechanics) will help your problem solving ability for E-mag.

    Also, being an essay subject, it's hard to get above a 2:1 in philosophy, whereas a first isn't too hard in physics. On the other hand, it's much easier to pass philosophy, and easy to fail physics if you do no work.

    The main thing was it takes away from your options in later years. You'll only cover the core of each subject. Physics is my primary interest, and I'd like to cover a lot of it. And philosophy is much easier (and interesting) to learn outside of the lecture hall.

    Having said this, I took a philosophy module in my first year, and am very glad I did. It gave me a more organised grounding to studying it in my spare time, as well as re-affirming skills to do this you only really get in the classroom. Also, as said, it's easy to pass essay subjects, so didn't detract from my physics work much at all. And since first year doesn't count, all i needed was a pass (got a low 2:1 with a single nights revision + good coursework).

    Next year I'm supposed to be doing all physics modules, but I'm tempted to ask if I can drop the astro module (stuff I'm not interested in, and not core for anything else) and might do another philosophy module.
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    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    You can find most A Level specifications online for the topics that are covered.

    After speaking to other people who went on the same day as me, almost anything can come up. If there are some things you really need to nail down then they are probably basic mechanics (M1 and M2), AS Maths (probably almost all of it except something like coordinate geometry (which is obviously less relevant)) and the fundamentals of physics (such as basic thermodynamics, electromagnetism, etc).

    Obviously, some topics form a better basis for interview questions than others. But I would really emphasise that whilst you'll be expected to know the basics (SUVAT, conversation laws, momentum, Newton's laws, heat flow, pressure, basic graph sketching, Kirchhoff's laws, rearranging algebra, etc.) you won't be pulled up on for a lack of knowledge in more specific areas (e.g. not knowing the Bernoulli equation). The interview is meant to test your physics/ maths ability to apply your knowledge to unfamiliar situations. And you aren't meant to know everything, but you are meant to show that you can apply what you do know to a situation, learn fast, pick up things, take a few hints, etc. to get to the right answer. The interview is more of a discussion about a question than it is just "answer this".

    Also if you are going to mention a specific area of physics on your personal Statement, then be prepared to cover it. e.g. If you said "I like relativity and I've read XXX book" then definitely be prepared to talk about it for a few minutes.
    Thank you. What book would you suggest to self-teach the entire A level syllabus and maybe something more? I really need to study on my own to get prepared for interviews.
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    I am not sire if this is the right forum.. I was wandering if all physics courses at uni's follow the same outline or if there is a particular university that offers a very varied course outline?
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    I am starting college in September and I am doing maths, physics, chemistry and geography. At uni I want to study physics so because I am not doing further maths will that reduce my chances.??


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    (Original post by Babogirl)
    I am starting college in September and I am doing maths, physics, chemistry and geography. At uni I want to study physics so because I am not doing further maths will that reduce my chances.??


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    I doubt it. I don't believe any universities require further maths for physics, not even Oxford, as many state colleges cannot provide it and so it would be unfair. The subjects you're studying sound fine for all the top universities.

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    I really need to do something for my personal statement soon as ive only just become set on physics does anyone have any ideas?
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    (Original post by Dominic101)
    I really need to do something for my personal statement soon as ive only just become set on physics does anyone have any ideas?
    Read books on physics and take up a hobby. Physics work experience is a little hard to come by

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    (Original post by adi19956)
    Read books on physics and take up a hobby. Physics work experience is a little hard to come by

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    Thanks, but the only probably is im not sure it that will be enough to get me into a top uni
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    (Original post by Dominic101)
    Thanks, but the only probably is im not sure it that will be enough to get me into a top uni
    What kind of uni are you thinking of? Most Russell Groups don't interview. Birmingham physics head of school said that he doesn't really care about personal statements

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    (Original post by adi19956)
    What kind of uni are you thinking of? Most Russell Groups don't interview. Birmingham physics head of school said that he doesn't really care about personal statements

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    Im thinking top 8 unis possibly
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    (Original post by Dominic101)
    Im thinking top 8 unis possibly
    That's your only requirement?

    Don't you want to look round some unis and see which you like?
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    Thanks


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    (Original post by adi19956)
    That's your only requirement?

    Don't you want to look round some unis and see which you like?
    Well yes I guess so, I mean the general content of a physics course will be the same wherever I go
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    (Original post by Dominic101)
    Well yes I guess so, I mean the general content of a physics course will be the same wherever I go
    But what about the universities themselves... Their location, the atmosphere etc?

    Imperial, Durham and St Andrews are very different.

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    (Original post by adi19956)
    But what about the universities themselves... Their location, the atmosphere etc?

    Imperial, Durham and St Andrews are very different.

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    Thats more of less irrelevant to me
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    (Original post by Babogirl)
    I am starting college in September and I am doing maths, physics, chemistry and geography. At uni I want to study physics so because I am not doing further maths will that reduce my chances.??


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    It may not reduce your chances about getting in, but from what I've found out physics at uni has a very high maths content, and although they will teach you the further maths topics required when you do the course, it helps a lot to be familiar with them. Especially at top unis, they recommend taking further maths to at least AS if you have the chance! I would seriously consider it, even if you study it in your own time. If you find maths comes quite naturally, then the maths AS course shouldn't be too difficult for you, so maybe think about doing AS further maths at college on top of your other subjects? (which is what I did)

    Hope that helps!!
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    (Original post by Dominic101)
    Thats more of less irrelevant to me
    Why? You're spending three/four years there; it's pretty important that you like where you are. I highly recommend visiting the universities - even if it's just a post-application day like I did - to get a feel for the place.
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    (Original post by bistonut)
    You have to do 6 modules, of which (for non-joint honours) 5 are compulsory. There's the core double module, in which you do courses on mechanics, electromagnetism, and "modern physics" which is quantum/atomic stuff, and half-courses on waves&optics and thermodynamics (half as they have half as many lectures). Then there's 2 maths modules, a labs module and a free one, which I do a philosophy as.

    So the topics are generally similar to A-level, apart from the quantum stuff, but with a lot more emphasis on maths. For instance, mechanics for me was really easy as I did most of it in further maths a level. There's a lot more focus on proofs of laws, and you'll see integral signs on every other page. On the exams there's usually only 10% for writing stuff, and the rest is equation solving. The more mechanics modules you do in maths a level the smoother the transition will be.
    Hey, I'm at Durham next year (so this isn't really the thread for me, but still), and I was wondering just how difficult the first-year course is, and what exactly do you cover on quantum?
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    (Original post by wrexhamfc)
    Why? You're spending three/four years there; it's pretty important that you like where you are. I highly recommend visiting the universities - even if it's just a post-application day like I did - to get a feel for the place.
    Anything will be a lot better than the squalor im in ,now trust me im not picky on location
 
 
 
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