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    Hi, i'm currently doing french at as and i love it. However i really want to get 90%+ in the subject so i can study languages at cambridge (i just ove the course!). But at the moment im only getting a low A grade. My weak points are the listening and reading sections of the paper. I know the way to improve at this is to widen my vocab (mine's quite poor...). How can i do this? Pls help me? I find that i don't know 'normal vocab' rather than topic specific vocab. How can i increase my vocab? What are the best ways to learn vocab? Any other tips to do well in the exam?

    Thx so much
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    To improve at listening - Literally listen to French radio.... all the time!
    To improve at reading - read le Monde or similar
    To learn vocab - read le Monde or similar. Read and write it out - repeatedly.
    In exam... keep calm. Have high energy drink before exam. It's v. strenuous. The night before I wrote out all verb conjugations, useful essay phrases and guessed at what topics were going to come up and wrote +ves/-ves for each. It sucks that no revision guide exists for A level french


    Good luck with Cambridge!
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    thanks for the advice, really useful
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    To be honest, getting high grades in AS French is pretty formulaic if you're decent at the language. Obviously, reading Le Monde and listening to French radio and stuff is highly recommended, especially if you want to do languages at Cambridge. Reading newspapers in particular helps you with inferring what an article is trying to say by translating the vocab you do know, and using common sense with the vocab you don't know.

    But the kind of vocab you get from mags and newspapers are so specialised that they're highly unlikely to come up in your exams. Learn all the vocab listed in the back of your textbook, and in all the reading and listening sections of past papers, because the same vocab keeps coming up. Learn to recognise them in sentences, to recognise them when you hear them, and it'll become second nature to you to translate them in exams. The normal vocab you're talking about, I guess, is like idiomatic phrases that pop up all the time, or the kind of phrases that you see a lot but don't really know what they mean?

    Trust me, past papers regurgitate the same sort of vocab, and the textbook reading, if you do it through and through, is really useful. I know that for GCSE, AQA also has a list of basic vocab - if you want to refresh your memory about vocab you should know but haven't really looked at for a while, have a look at the list: from p23 of this http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse...-4655-W-SP.PDF
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    It might also be worth learning the topic specific vocab in the textbook, because those are likely to come up (i.e. the stuff about pollution, drugs etc.) It won't be that useful in actually speaking French in France for example, but it will help a lot in the exam.
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    (Original post by malvika111)
    To be honest, getting high grades in AS French is pretty formulaic if you're decent at the language. Obviously, reading Le Monde and listening to French radio and stuff is highly recommended, especially if you want to do languages at Cambridge. Reading newspapers in particular helps you with inferring what an article is trying to say by translating the vocab you do know, and using common sense with the vocab you don't know.

    But the kind of vocab you get from mags and newspapers are so specialised that they're highly unlikely to come up in your exams. Learn all the vocab listed in the back of your textbook, and in all the reading and listening sections of past papers, because the same vocab keeps coming up. Learn to recognise them in sentences, to recognise them when you hear them, and it'll become second nature to you to translate them in exams. The normal vocab you're talking about, I guess, is like idiomatic phrases that pop up all the time, or the kind of phrases that you see a lot but don't really know what they mean?

    Trust me, past papers regurgitate the same sort of vocab, and the textbook reading, if you do it through and through, is really useful. I know that for GCSE, AQA also has a list of basic vocab - if you want to refresh your memory about vocab you should know but haven't really looked at for a while, have a look at the list: from p23 of this http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse...-4655-W-SP.PDF
    Thanks, im going to look through past papers and pick out vocab i don't know Do you have any advice on how to improve my listening skills?
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    (Original post by monies)
    Thanks, im going to look through past papers and pick out vocab i don't know Do you have any advice on how to improve my listening skills?
    Listen to the past listening exams. Again, pick out unfamiliar vocab and learn it. Remember, you can rewind the tape and listen again and again. So the first time you listen, try and get the general gist of what they're telling you, without answering the questions - just understand as much of it as you can. When you're sure you've understood it, then listen more closely for what the question's asking. Once again, it's a matter of knowing the vocab so you aren't baffled. Learning the vocab for your reading will help you. Know how those words are supposed to sound, and learn to recognise them. Listening to the radio does help in terms of practising the skill of understanding what you're listening to, rather than just trying to translate words.
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    (Original post by monies)
    Hi, i'm currently doing french at as and i love it. However i really want to get 90%+ in the subject so i can study languages at cambridge (i just ove the course!). But at the moment im only getting a low A grade. My weak points are the listening and reading sections of the paper. I know the way to improve at this is to widen my vocab (mine's quite poor...). How can i do this? Pls help me? I find that i don't know 'normal vocab' rather than topic specific vocab. How can i increase my vocab? What are the best ways to learn vocab? Any other tips to do well in the exam?

    Thx so much
    Listening and reading are essentially just about comprehension, knowing what words mean. Go over your textbook, skim through it and take a note of words you don't know and learn them. I use an indexed A-Z notepad and a pack of erasable pens, record the new vocab, then rub them out when they've been learnt.

    This method has sufficed, though I would like to find a complete vocab list for this spec.
 
 
 
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