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OCR AS Psychology: G542: Core Studies - Wednesday 5th June 2013 Watch

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    (Original post by Simran Mars Foster)
    Reductionist- when behavour is said to be caused by one factor only. For example 'agressive behavour is due to genes'.

    Realism. Just relates to the egological validity of the study in terms of real life. For example in Milgram do we really shock people on a normal basis?
    Ah okay, so what's the difference between experimental realism and mundane realism? Thanks
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    Can someone please go through the procedure for Sperry please? getting quite confused with visual fields, eyes and hemispheres
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    (Original post by DEb96)
    Can someone please go through the procedure for Sperry please? getting quite confused with visual fields, eyes and hemispheres
    argh thats the worst study
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    (Original post by random1234567)
    argh thats the worst study
    Yeah I know I need to get my head around it!
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    (Original post by DEb96)
    Ah okay, so what's the difference between experimental realism and mundane realism? Thanks
    If a study has high mundane realism then it reflects a real life situation. Often participants will believe that the study is real. Essentially it all relates back to ecological validity, in that the study is going to be very high in it and represents a real life situation, or its not.

    Milgram is seen to be very high in mundane realism. Although it was a controlled observation and can be criticized for being low in ecological validity, the participants did believe that it was real. If they didn't, then the huge dilemma over breaking ethics wouldn't have been caused because participants went through so much stress when doing the study.
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    (Original post by random1234567)
    you could go on youtube and search for the core study videos since you are a visual learner
    Ah yes thats a good idea thank you so much!
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    (Original post by DEb96)
    Yeah I know I need to get my head around it!
    if that comes up for section B im not even gonna attempt that study haha!
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    Hi how could you improve baron cohen other then using a video?
    Also how will it change the results thanks!
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    (Original post by beth1995x)
    For question b in section C my answers always end up really long for a 4 mark question :/ but its not tooooo over the top.... Give an example of what you'd write for a 4 mark question and maybe we can help you work out which bits aren't needed?
    This is an example of a 4 mark question I'd write... It seems small when you type it up but when its written its easily half a page for me.

    The behaviourist perspective could explain phobias as it assumes behaviour is learned from and shaped by our environment including other people and our experiences. Therefore the perspective explains phobias by development of association. For example Little Albert’s study is an example of classical conditioning where a 12 month year old baby (Albert) is conditioned to be frightened of a white rate as everyone he plays with it someone creeps up behind and banging an iron bar creating a loud noise. Therefore he associated a loud noise with the rate and did not want to play with the rate as he did not want to hear the loud noise. This caused a phobia of white rats as other furry objects. This shows there phobias can develop through association of stimuli.

    What would you get rid of if you were writing this?
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    (Original post by >Username<)
    This is an example of a 4 mark question I'd write... It seems small when you type it up but when its written its easily half a page for me.

    The behaviourist perspective could explain phobias as it assumes behaviour is learned from and shaped by our environment including other people and our experiences. Therefore the perspective explains phobias by development of association. For example Little Albert’s study is an example of classical conditioning where a 12 month year old baby (Albert) is conditioned to be frightened of a white rate as everyone he plays with it someone creeps up behind and banging an iron bar creating a loud noise. Therefore he associated a loud noise with the rate and did not want to play with the rate as he did not want to hear the loud noise. This caused a phobia of white rats as other furry objects. This shows there phobias can develop through association of stimuli.

    What would you get rid of if you were writing this?
    Your answer sounds really good but I think maybe you could take out some of the detail about Little Albert as you only need to highlight the key findings of it in order to get the full 4 marks... so for example you could put something along the lines of... : "in the study of Little Albert, Little Albert developed a fear of white rats through classical conditioning as he had formed an association between the loud noise of the iron bar which frightened him, and the white rat, therefore causing him to fear the rat and other white fluffy objects which resembled the rat" - you could probably word this slightly better as I just made it up on the spot, and obviously keep the introduction part about the behaviourist perspective =)

    Do you know what studies could actually come up under the Behaviourist approach?? Because our teacher's mentioned Bandura, Milgram, Savage Rumbaugh and Piliavin and that's it :/
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    What are reasons why Sperry may be considered valid and not valid?

    I know its quasi experiment so that makes it valid, what's another reason?
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    (Original post by beth1995x)
    Your answer sounds really good but I think maybe you could take out some of the detail about Little Albert as you only need to highlight the key findings of it in order to get the full 4 marks... so for example you could put something along the lines of... : "in the study of Little Albert, Little Albert developed a fear of white rats through classical conditioning as he had formed an association between the loud noise of the iron bar which frightened him, and the white rat, therefore causing him to fear the rat and other white fluffy objects which resembled the rat" - you could probably word this slightly better as I just made it up on the spot, and obviously keep the introduction part about the behaviourist perspective =)

    Do you know what studies could actually come up under the Behaviourist approach?? Because our teacher's mentioned Bandura, Milgram, Savage Rumbaugh and Piliavin and that's it :/
    and Griffiths and Reicher and Haslam
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    Behaviourist Perspective has only come up once in June 2010 so I think that could come up.
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    (Original post by Greenbear99)
    Behaviourist Perspective has only come up once in June 2010 so I think that could come up.
    What else do you think may come up?
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    (Original post by qs2xo)
    holy crap my hand aches after doing core studies past papers. Why does core studies require so much writing goddammit!?

    Also how's everyone feeling for section b and c?
    i did a mock today in school and wow.. for section C on the last question, i took up all of the lines AND a whole page of the 'additional page' at the back of the paper.

    I think that's the question that I have the most trouble with when it comes to shorting my answers! but i suppose it's not that bad as I finished with 15 minutes left over so it's not as if I ran out of time..
    but there's more chance that I can lose marks due to no organisation/poor grammar etc.

    (Original post by Billie Jean)
    Hey does anyone know the backgrounds for Baron - Cohen, Dement and Klietman, Sperry, Thigpen and Cleckley and Rosenhan??? :/ because I find myself writing toooo much for just a 2 marker question or a 4 marker for the section B a.) Question. Can anyone tell me 2 main points on the background for each of those studies? That will be a huge help THANK YOU!!
    Baron-Cohen - the key cognitive deficit in people with autism is a lack of theory of mind (ability to infer, in other people, a range of mental states, emotions, feelings etc)

    it is said that autism is linked with frontal brain abnormalities, and the same for people with tourette syndrome

    I'd also mention about the sally-anne test not being a valid test for adults with autism and it was designed for 6 year old autistic children, so creates a ceiling effect for the adults.


    Dement and Kleitman - EEG scans (measures brain activity) and EOG (used to measure the eye movement)

    REM sleep (rapid eye movement) is where darting eye movement occurs, the body is in temporary paralysis, this stage is associated with dreaming



    I have no idea about sperry to be honest, i still need to go over that. But i know that you'd need to know about the split brain operation - it's where the corpus callosum is severed so that the connections between the left and right hemisphere are separated so data cannot be transferred between the two hemispheres. This was used for those who suffered from severe epilepsy that could not be reduced by medicine.


    i don't know much about the background for Thigpen and Cleckley or Rosenhan, I don't think there's much to learn though. My teacher went over the different diagnostic manuals for rosenhan, but this is not required! For Thigpen and Cleckley i suppose you just need to know what a personalty is and maybe how hypnotism works (in able for you to understand the validity of the treatment that the therapists used)


    i hope this clears anything up.. These are just the main points to be honest!
    I uploaded a presentation I made for the background of Dement and Kleitman. I tried to make it simplistic.. so hope it helps
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: pptx dement and kleitman.pptx (133.3 KB, 68 views)
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    (Original post by DEb96)
    Can someone please go through the procedure for Sperry please? getting quite confused with visual fields, eyes and hemispheres
    ok so language resides in the left hemisphere
    and the right hemisphere allows the left hand to draw, but cannot spell words or speak words as language is not in this hemisphere.


    if something is displayed to the left visual field (for example the word case) then the right hemisphere processes this information, and therefore you are able to draw a picture of a case using your left hand, but when asked what you drew you are not able to say the word case as language is in the left hemisphere

    if the word 'key' is displayed to the right visual field then this is processed by the left hemisphere, meaning you can say the word key and write the word key if asked.

    so overall, language = left hemisphere.
    left visual field goes to right hemisphere (this hemisphere controls the left side of your body i believe?)
    right visual field goes to left hemisphere (this hemisphere controls the right side of your body i believe?)



    (Original post by random1234567)
    Hi how could you improve baron cohen other then using a video?
    Also how will it change the results thanks!
    I would add more context and a full body picture of someone. for example, telling a story and then being shown a picture of someone from the story. they could be frowning and crossing their arms in anger. This would increase the ecological validity as other factors such as context to a situation and body language are included, which people use to help understand how others are feeling in real life situations.
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    Hello, does anyone know any differences between the psychodynamic approach please?
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    (Original post by wolalala)
    Hello, does anyone know any differences between the psychodynamic approach please?
    you could say that thigpen and cleckley used some objective measures such as psychometric tests and EEG scans, where as Freud used measures that were not objective such as observation
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    (Original post by jodie.irwin27)
    you could say that thigpen and cleckley used some objective measures such as psychometric tests and EEG scans, where as Freud used measures that were not objective such as observation
    ahh yes that's true, Thank you for replying could you also say that in freud there was mainly qualitative data such as conversations between little Hans and his father, whereas Thigpen & cleckley there was quanitative ( psychometric tests) and qualitative data (interiews with Eve white) etc.. ?
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    (Original post by wolalala)
    ahh yes that's true, Thank you for replying could you also say that in freud there was mainly qualitative data such as conversations between little Hans and his father, whereas Thigpen & cleckley there was quanitative ( psychometric tests) and qualitative data (interiews with Eve white) etc.. ?
    Yes you could say that and through IQ tests
 
 
 
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