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    Hi everyone

    I'm really appealing to anyone who studied European history, or British history, as I suppose they are similarly structured. I've been looking at the exams from previous years (I already knew about the 4 sections) and there seems to be SO MUCH stuff that we need to learn and cover, and I'm doubting whether it is is actually possible learn very much, because the questions need you to have quite fleshy knowledge about what they're asking.

    A few people have said just to revise a couple of themes from each of the 4 sections, but looking at past papers there doesn't seem to be a pattern and surely you risk a question not being on there.

    I really don't know what to do and am really panicking. I've asked my tutor, who has twice told me "to chill out as I have 3 years left" and not actually given me an answer, so I'm relying on any other advice I can get. If I know what people generally do, I can get on and start revising now, and catching up on any lost content that I'll need.

    I really love history, love writing the essays for it, and I'd love revising for exams if I knew vaguely what to do. Any help would be sooo appreciated.

    Thank you for any help xx
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    (Original post by DurhamLady)
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    As a non-reviser, I can tell you that I practically failed the British History exam some years ago. On reflection (and compared to much "harder" stuff that I have done since), that course is nigh on impossible to prepare for in any structured way that guarantees success. So I suspect your tutor has the same approach as me - you really have to mess up to actually fail and the grade won't matter in the grand scheme of things.
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    As a non-reviser, I can tell you that I practically failed the British History exam some years ago. On reflection (and compared to much "harder" stuff that I have done since), that course is nigh on impossible to prepare for in any structured way that guarantees success. So I suspect your tutor has the same approach as me - you really have to mess up to actually fail and the grade won't matter in the grand scheme of things.
    Hmm, okay. So do later courses get better in terms of structure? Is this module kind of unique in that its so difficult to revise for in a structured way?
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    (Original post by DurhamLady)
    Hmm, okay. So do later courses get better in terms of structure? Is this module kind of unique in that its so difficult to revise for in a structured way?
    Early courses (particularly ones like British 1 and European 1) are very very broad in nature, teach almost nothing and provide limited support, yet examine in depth on a plethora of stuff. In contrast, later courses tend to go into more detail on less stuff, with better reading, better support, better coursework and more focussed exams. It doesn't do any harm that you get better as a student as you through the system either.
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    Early courses (particularly ones like British 1 and European 1) are very very broad in nature, teach almost nothing and provide limited support, yet examine in depth on a plethora of stuff. In contrast, later courses tend to go into more detail on less stuff, with better reading, better support, better coursework and more focussed exams. It doesn't do any harm that you get better as a student as you through the system either.
    Many thanks for your insight. It has been difficult to see what lies ahead on the course, and I've frankly been dreading could be to come, whether they will all be like EH1. It's funny what you have said about the reading - we are given about 11 big books on the weekly reading list, with no chapter recommendations or key words or anything, whereas my friends at other unis get so much more structure. I hope the reading, too, improves over time.

    I'm sorry for being a pain, but is there any particular modules you would say to avoid in later years. Obviously you should do what interests you, but if there's any infamous ones that should just be avoided.

    It is hard to know what is "normal", and I've been thinking about reapplying somewhere else, but it is so difficult to know what would be different.
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    (Original post by DurhamLady)
    Many thanks for your insight. It has been difficult to see what lies ahead on the course, and I've frankly been dreading could be to come, whether they will all be like EH1. It's funny what you have said about the reading - we are given about 11 big books on the weekly reading list, with no chapter recommendations or key words or anything, whereas my friends at other unis get so much more structure. I hope the reading, too, improves over time.

    I'm sorry for being a pain, but is there any particular modules you would say to avoid in later years. Obviously you should do what interests you, but if there's any infamous ones that should just be avoided.

    It is hard to know what is "normal", and I've been thinking about reapplying somewhere else, but it is so difficult to know what would be different.
    Well, I'm not a historian (although I know a lot of them). I think it gets better with time. Other universities with more "structure" don't provide the same level of interest later on (it's just a bit spoon-feedy), and other places are similar to Edinburgh (or so I suspect). My tip is to always ensure you submit forms etc on time/early to make sure you get options you want, go to seminars/lectures outside of your set courses if there's something that looks interesting, to give you face time with lecturers etc.
 
 
 
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