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    (Original post by Ilikeviruses)
    I can speak as a non-Maths student, and that graph question was awful. I understand that y=mc+c for a straight line, but I had and have no idea how to interpret it for a delta G equation.
    Exactly it was a joke, not happy with that. Let's just hope grade boundaries drop!


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    GUYS!!!! for the colour questions I WROTE ALL THE EQUATIONS AS IONIC INSTEAD OF OVERALL!! WOULD I LOSE ALL THE MARKS??
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    I thought that paper was quite difficult I didn't like the 5 marker calculation, I couldn't figure out which formula to use. I didn't like the line question and I probably messed up other 1 markers which is so annoying because they all add up in the end

    How do you describe 'perfect ionic model' I forgot so I just put 'perfect spheres with 100% ionic bonding' would I get any marks?
    I really hope the boundaries are low...
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    To be honest for that add naoh question they will probably give you marks for an equation which gives the correct coloured complex so long as it balances and uses the correct reagent so it doesnt matter if you put naoh or oh-
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    (Original post by RoaringLion)
    Exactly it was a joke, not happy with that. Let's just hope grade boundaries drop!


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    Im sorry, but they gave you the equation. Anyone with common sense and a gcse in Maths could've figured it out.

    Funnily enough the y quantity is the y axis and the x quantity is the x axis... After that how hard is it to work out?

    Edit: ahah, knew I'd get thumbed down for this, not my fault some people have the common sense of a brick and blame the exam boards for a "dodgy question." Y=mx+c is common knowledge for a science subject, if you don't know that, perhaps you shouldn't be doing it.
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    For the last question, working out ratio of Cl to Co, what method did you use? (if you managed to do it)

    And what was your explanation for why the experimental value did not match the expected value?

    It was such a nasty question...
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    (Original post by salsharifi)
    For the last question, working out ratio of Cl to Co, what method did you use? (if you managed to do it)

    And what was your explanation for why the experimental value did not match the expected value?

    It was such a nasty question...
    I did it by working out n for each substance, using n=m/Mr and n=cv and I got 2.9 for Cl and 1 for Co, hence 3:1 ratio.

    And I said that the expected value is an average taken over numerous tests, but idk if that's right.
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    (Original post by esl_94)
    I have put up the whole paper - my problem was I could't see which pages I hadn't uploaded
    Where are the rest of the pages? I can only see Q'ns 6,7,8
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    (Original post by godjohnson)
    Where are the rest of the pages? I can only see Q'ns 6,7,8
    they are on a previous page of the thread

    Its on 159
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    (Original post by Jesss9)
    What two question's are missing? I don't know what I need for an A because I retook chem 2 and 4 but if they went well I can still get an A with a bad chem 5 mark! (fingers crossed) Hopefully grade boundaries will be really low or the mark scheme particularly nice and we can still get what we need!
    Q2 & Q3 arent on it. I'm hoping they are low aswel. They would need to be.


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    for the one about why the ammeter reading falls to zero, could you say that the copper electrode on the right has completely oxidised and there are no more cu2+ ions left
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    (Original post by Croydon'Stepper)
    Im sorry, but they gave you the equation. Anyone with common sense and a gcse in Maths could've figured it out.

    Funnily enough the y quantity is the y axis and the x quantity is the x axis... After that how hard is it to work out?

    Edit: ahah, knew I'd get thumbed down for this, not my fault some people have the common sense of a brick and blame the exam boards for a "dodgy question." Y=mx+c is common knowledge for a science subject, if you don't know that, perhaps you shouldn't be doing it.
    Lol you deserve to get negged when you choose to post like an arrogant, showboating know it all. I think you need to have a sit down with your ego son.

    Sit your pompous arse down and keep your ****y opinions to yourself...
    You know what they say, if you haven't got nothing nice to say, then don't say nothing at all.




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    (Original post by Croydon'Stepper)
    Im sorry, but they gave you the equation. Anyone with common sense and a gcse in Maths could've figured it out.

    Funnily enough the y quantity is the y axis and the x quantity is the x axis... After that how hard is it to work out?

    Edit: ahah, knew I'd get thumbed down for this, not my fault some people have the common sense of a brick and blame the exam boards for a "dodgy question." Y=mx+c is common knowledge for a science subject, if you don't know that, perhaps you shouldn't be doing it.
    Right. Because you remember the details from all your GCSE subjects?
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    (Original post by Cwestby)
    Sorry
    It's just quit inconsiderate really of others that won't get the grades like yours.
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    (Original post by TommehBoi)
    It's just quit inconsiderate really of others that won't get the grades like yours.
    I was just asking a simple question, just because people have different targets they want to achieve doesn't mean you should be offensive. It wasn't like I was showing off to belittle anybody
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    (Original post by Croydon'Stepper)
    Im sorry, but they gave you the equation. Anyone with common sense and a gcse in Maths could've figured it out.

    Funnily enough the y quantity is the y axis and the x quantity is the x axis... After that how hard is it to work out?

    Edit: ahah, knew I'd get thumbed down for this, not my fault some people have the common sense of a brick and blame the exam boards for a "dodgy question." Y=mx+c is common knowledge for a science subject, if you don't know that, perhaps you shouldn't be doing it.
    preach
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    (Original post by Croydon'Stepper)
    Im sorry, but they gave you the equation. Anyone with common sense and a gcse in Maths could've figured it out.

    Funnily enough the y quantity is the y axis and the x quantity is the x axis... After that how hard is it to work out?

    Edit: ahah, knew I'd get thumbed down for this, not my fault some people have the common sense of a brick and blame the exam boards for a "dodgy question." Y=mx+c is common knowledge for a science subject, if you don't know that, perhaps you shouldn't be doing it.
    go forth and reproduce
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    As a student who studies both Mathematics and Physics A-Level, I did think that paper gave an unfair advantage to those students who are familiar with mathematical principles such as the equation of a straight line, and the equation E=hv. Overall the paper was quite challenging, weird and not straightforward. The questions were a riddle themselves, and since when was [Ag(H2O)2]+ a complex that we needed to know about? Its not on the specification, nor is it in the book for crying out loud AQA if you're going to create an A-level syllabus you should at least stick to it instead of going off on a tangent (which happens to obey the equation y=mx+c :rolleyes:)
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    (Original post by Technetium)
    As a student who studies both Mathematics and Physics A-Level, I did think that paper gave an unfair advantage to those students who are familiar with mathematical principles such as the equation of a straight line, and the equation E=hv. Overall the paper was quite challenging, weird and not straightforward. The questions were a riddle themselves, and since when was [Ag(H2O)2]+ a complex that we needed to know about? Its not on the specification, nor is it in the book for crying out loud AQA if you're going to create an A-level syllabus you should at least stick to it instead of going off on a tangent (which happens to obey the equation y=mx+c :rolleyes:)
    Finally someone who speaks sense. Thank you. And I agree with you!


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    (Original post by RoaringLion)
    Finally someone who speaks sense. Thank you. And I agree with you!


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    it is in the textbook mate, its at the bottom of one of the pages when it gives an example for a linear structure...............
 
 
 
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