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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    I disagree, you need to have a decent amount of ability in your subject. There is no way a non mathematician could coast through a maths degree.
    If you're doing a Maths degree, then you're a mathematician by definition. I certainly couldn't coast through a Maths degree any more than you could've coasted through mine. But if you have any kind of aptitude - which being accepted onto the course to start with would imply - then it's perfectly possible to do very little and get a Third in any degree.

    You described your course/subject as "lazy". I'm pretty sure there's more you can do beyond getting through your set questions and stopping. Just doing what you're told to do and no more, would have been regarded as coasting on my degree. Maybe I'm just misunderstanding.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    If you're doing a Maths degree, then you're a mathematician by definition. I certainly couldn't coast through a Maths degree any more than you could've coasted through mine. But if you have any kind of aptitude - which being accepted onto the course to start with would imply - then it's perfectly possible to do very little and get a Third in any degree.

    You described your course/subject as "lazy". I'm pretty sure there's more you can do beyond getting through your set questions and stopping. Just doing what you're told to do and no more, would have been regarded as coasting on my degree. Maybe I'm just misunderstanding.
    any more than you could've coasted through mine.
    I know many mathematicians who could coast through a sociology degree but as we all know it obviously doesn't work the other way round.

    imply - then it's perfectly possible to do very little and get a Third in any degree.
    I agree, I feel university standards are not that much greater than A2. The content at times is on level with A2 Level ( speaking for maths and my degree) and some of the content is on a slightly higher standard. But there isn't much value in a third other than claiming you have the degree, it frankly kills off your chance for a masters and doesn't look good on a job application.

    I'm pretty sure there's more you can do beyond getting through your set questions and stopping.
    There isn't really, the exam will be full of questions to do. You just practise questions from each topic and you are set. I'm not going to go round reading on the history of mathematics as it is of no use to me in my degree other than of interest value.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    I know many mathematicians who could coast through a sociology degree but as we all know it obviously doesn't work the other way round.
    I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss Humanities students. I walked through Stats exams involving stuff like Chi Square and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, comfortably enough. It was a shared unit and I got better marks than all the Maths students as well (came top in my year).

    There isn't really, the exam will be full of questions to do. You just practise questions from each topic and you are set. I'm not going to go round reading on the history of mathematics as it is of no use to me in my degree other than of interest value.
    That's very sad. My undergrad research was published. Doesn't sound like you have any opportunity to do something original. Reading on something that interests you is never wasted time, especially as the work directly related to your degree seems to take up so little of it.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss Humanities students. I walked through Stats exams involving stuff like Chi Square and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, comfortably enough. It was a shared unit and I got better marks than all the Maths students as well (came top in my year).


    That's very sad. My undergrad research was published. Doesn't sound like you have any opportunity to do something original. Reading on something that interests you is never wasted time, especially as the work directly related to your degree seems to take up so little of it.
    Maths is a tougher subject than Sociology, there is no point arguing about it. If you took the whole population and made them sit one sociology exam and one maths exam, the maths marks would be lower.

    Chi Squared Test and Spearman Rank Test are not difficult topics in statistics. They are first year maths degree or A2 Level Maths level. Spearman Rank is essentially ranking data and plugging it into a formula. Chi Squared is a bit more tedious but it isn't too hard.

    If you really want to look into some hardcore maths have a look at Euler's method, it's derivation, interval stability etc.

    Hardly any undergrads have their research published, heck they dont even do research really and even if they did it's usually a little project that has no real intrinsic value for the subject area.
    Research is done by phD students and more obviously doctors and professors in the field.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    Maths is a tougher subject than Sociology, there is no point arguing about it. If you took the whole population and made them sit one sociology exam and one maths exam, the maths marks would be lower.
    This could be a function of how math is taught in a country versus the emphasis placed on non-maths based subjects prior to university. I wonder what the results would be in an Asian, East European/Former Soviet, South Asia.....or other region where education is more math intensive.
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    I suspect the degree to which it matters where you study a postgraduate degree is dependent on where you studied your undergraduate degree. To take an example i am studying at Leeds Met with the hope of doing a Masters in Economic Policy at UCL, Birmingham, Bristol or Glasgow and so i suspect that there will be many more more doors opened there than were opened at undergraduate however had i already gone to a strong recruitment university such as Bristol for my undergraduate then where i do the postgraduate would likely be much less important.
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    I don't think it matters where you do your masters as long as they have reputable teaching staff and decent facilities. I think a masters (like others have said) is beneficial depending on the subject. My other half is a php web developer and he didn't do a masters. I'm studying a masters at the moment as I want to work in animal forensics and wildlife crime and there are only ~50 in the world that do it. If I wanna be in with them I need more refined skills and knowledge which I hope to gain from my more specialised masters course.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    Hardly any undergrads have their research published, heck they dont even do research really and even if they did it's usually a little project that has no real intrinsic value for the subject area.
    Research is done by phD students and more obviously doctors and professors in the field.
    I think you've misunderstood the role and focus of the undergrad dissertation - it may be due to a difference between Humanities and maths.

    Naturally an undergrad diss is an apprentice piece and your first attempt at semi-independent research. However at my undergrad uni (and again, this just may be a difference between our organisations) in order to be awarded a First for the diss, it had to be original research working from primary source material which contributed to existing knowledge. This meant that whilst unusual, there was definitely scope for an undergrad to produce research of a quality suitable for peer-reviewed publication (as mine was). I wasn't the only person in my cohort to have their undergrad diss research published.

    My Masters diss was also recommended for publication, but I'm currently working on a project for publication which will supercede it. Worthwhile and meaningful research is carried out at every level of a university, from undergraduate to departmental heads and senior academics. Given the right aptitude and supervision, undergrad diss research can be as valid and publishable as any other. The fact that it's rare doesn't mean that it isn't achievable and isn't worth aiming for. Publication is key to establishing an academic career, so the earlier you start, the better your foothold on the slippery ladder. It's a shame that some unis don't seem to be encouraging this perspective in undergrads.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I think you've misunderstood the role and focus of the undergrad dissertation - it may be due to a difference between Humanities and maths.

    Naturally an undergrad diss is an apprentice piece and your first attempt at semi-independent research. However at my undergrad uni (and again, this just may be a difference between our organisations) in order to be awarded a First for the diss, it had to be original research working from primary source material which contributed to existing knowledge. This meant that whilst unusual, there was definitely scope for an undergrad to produce research of a quality suitable for peer-reviewed publication (as mine was). I wasn't the only person in my cohort to have their undergrad diss research published.

    My Masters diss was also recommended for publication, but I'm currently working on a project for publication which will supercede it. Worthwhile and meaningful research is carried out at every level of a university, from undergraduate to departmental heads and senior academics. Given the right aptitude and supervision, undergrad diss research can be as valid and publishable as any other. The fact that it's rare doesn't mean that it isn't achievable and isn't worth aiming for. Publication is key to establishing an academic career, so the earlier you start, the better your foothold on the slippery ladder. It's a shame that some unis don't seem to be encouraging this perspective in undergrads.
    What was your undergraduate degree in and what was your undergraduate dissertation about?
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    What was your undergraduate degree in and what was your undergraduate dissertation about?
    That would identify me and I prefer to remain anonymous here, thanks.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    That would identify me and I prefer to remain anonymous here, thanks.
    Ok you dont need to give me the name of the dissertation but you could at least tell me what course you do and what topic area you wrote the dissertation about.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    I agree, I feel university standards are not that much greater than A2. The content at times is on level with A2 Level ( speaking for maths and my degree) and some of the content is on a slightly higher standard. But there isn't much value in a third other than claiming you have the degree, it frankly kills off your chance for a masters and doesn't look good on a job application.

    .
    Where exactly do you study? If your maths degree content is on level with/slightly harder than A2 then the course then your course must be absolutely pathetic. I think you’ll find most maths courses are significantly more advanced than A2, and where I studied (Cambridge) you had to sit exams that were much, much harder than A2 (STEP) just to get in. Things only got harder from there.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    Ok you dont need to give me the name of the dissertation but you could at least tell me what course you do and what topic area you wrote the dissertation about.
    Well I finished the degree a couple of years ago (remember that you're in the Postgrad section ), it had a very small intake and was the only one in the country (has now been axed). So even the course title would narrow it down to a specific uni and a dozen potential people. But as an overview, the degree was archaeology-based as was the diss. Not sure if that helps?
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    Maths is a tougher subject than Sociology, there is no point arguing about it. If you took the whole population and made them sit one sociology exam and one maths exam, the maths marks would be lower.
    I would expect a mathematician to realise that one cannot be so definitive about such subjective issues such as the 'toughness' of an academic subject or pre-judging the outcome of an as-yet untried experiment.

    Chi Squared Test and Spearman Rank Test are not difficult topics in statistics. They are first year maths degree or A2 Level Maths level. Spearman Rank is essentially ranking data and plugging it into a formula. Chi Squared is a bit more tedious but it isn't too hard.

    If you really want to look into some hardcore maths have a look at Euler's method, it's derivation, interval stability etc.
    I think we have to deconvolute aptitude and knowledge here. It is a common mistake amongst people to mistake a current lack of knowledge with an inability to ever posses it in the future.

    Hardly any undergrads have their research published, heck they dont even do research really and even if they did it's usually a little project that has no real intrinsic value for the subject area.
    Depends on the area, project and aptitude of the student. Entirely an individual thing.

    Research is done by phD students and more obviously doctors and professors in the field.
    Depends how you define 'done'. PI's and PhD students have very different roles in research usually.
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Where exactly do you study? If your maths degree content is on level with/slightly harder than A2 then the course then your course must be absolutely pathetic. I think you’ll find most maths courses are significantly more advanced than A2, and where I studied (Cambridge) you had to sit exams that were much, much harder than A2 (STEP) just to get in. Things only got harder from there.
    Thank you for just ****ging off my course and university. My course isn't pathetic, it's a normal maths course and the stuff isn't much harder than A2.

    We cover areas such as Linear Algebra, Methods of Optimisation,Numerical Mathematics etc. And this stuff isn't that much harder than A2, for example in Linear Algebra using Gaussian Elimination isn't exactly rocket science.
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Where exactly do you study? If your maths degree content is on level with/slightly harder than A2 then the course then your course must be absolutely pathetic. I think you’ll find most maths courses are significantly more advanced than A2, and where I studied (Cambridge) you had to sit exams that were much, much harder than A2 (STEP) just to get in. Things only got harder from there.
    And one more thing sir....

    Maybe you could just be a tad bit nicer to people. We only have a short time on this Earth to make something useful of our lives, so rather than giving that "im so much smarter than you" impression, grow a pair and take the higher ground for once in your life.
    Whoever wants to neg me can neg me as much as they ****ing like, the truth will always be the ****ing truth. End of.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    And one more thing sir....

    Maybe you could just be a tad bit nicer to people. We only have a short time on this Earth to make something useful of our lives, so rather than giving that "im so much smarter than you" impression, grow a pair and take the higher ground for once in your life.
    Whoever wants to neg me can neg me as much as they ****ing like, the truth will always be the ****ing truth. End of.
    :rofl: pot calling the kettle black!!
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    Thank you for just ****ging off my course and university. My course isn't pathetic, it's a normal maths course and the stuff isn't much harder than A2.

    We cover areas such as Linear Algebra, Methods of Optimisation,Numerical Mathematics etc. And this stuff isn't that much harder than A2, for example in Linear Algebra using Gaussian Elimination isn't exactly rocket science.
    It doesn’t exactly sound normal. The average maths course is actually quite a lot harder than A2. Your course sounds very methods based and is lacking in several areas. For most maths courses, things like Gaussian Elimination is covered in the first term, if not just assumed you know it before arriving.

    (Original post by advice_guru)
    And one more thing sir....

    Maybe you could just be a tad bit nicer to people. We only have a short time on this Earth to make something useful of our lives, so rather than giving that "im so much smarter than you" impression, grow a pair and take the higher ground for once in your life.
    Whoever wants to neg me can neg me as much as they ****ing like, the truth will always be the ****ing truth. End of.
    Somewhat hypocritical given you’ve just been ****ging of humanities students in general by suggesting your maths course is just sooo much harder and that they couldn’t possibly complete it whereas you’d just breeze their course. Given that Klix did very well on her statistics module suggests she would actually have coped well with a maths course.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    Maybe you could just be a tad bit nicer to people.
    ...
    Whoever wants to neg me can neg me as much as they ****ing like, the truth will always be the ****ing truth. End of.
    I don't believe anyone else here has resorted to bad language, so a reflexive consideration of what you have just posted might be in order.

    Participants in the conversation have presented logical discussion points based on statements which you have made. Swearing is unnecessary and "truth" is subjective.

    In post #14 you said:
    I do maths, which is frankly lazy, you remember very little and the only tedious thing is doing a few questions for each topic
    It seems hypocritical to berate others for insulting your course. You plainly don't have a high opinion of it.
 
 
 
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