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Is this just stomach weight or hyperlordosis? Watch

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    I want to know if I have that condition hyperlordosis or if I look the way I do because i have a short torso, im only 4ft11. My stomach sticks out when i stand naturally i can pull it in but it means tensing my abb muscles all the time. I think my stomach is fairly toned I can see the muscles but it still sticks out. When im wearing a baggy t shirt people have commented on how im 'getting a stomach' but my stomach is actually toned i get plenty of exercise. Ive also noticed that my stomach sticks out even more at the end of the day. Here are several pics, is my spine too curved would you say?
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    You do seem to have a rather pronounced lordosis, but this may be postural habit, just as it may be anatomical.

    If it is bothering you, visit your GP. Although I doubt that they will do anything unless it is causing you pain, or progressing significantly.
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    (Original post by Pigling)
    You do seem to have a rather pronounced lordosis, but this may be postural habit, just as it may be anatomical.

    If it is bothering you, visit your GP. Although I doubt that they will do anything unless it is causing you pain, or progressing significantly.
    Is there a way in which i can tell whether its postural or anatomical? I feel daft going to the gp about something like this plus theres a long waiting list to see a physio. I cant afford to see an expensive private physio
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    Is there a way in which i can tell whether its postural or anatomical? I feel daft going to the gp about something like this plus theres a long waiting list to see a physio. I cant afford to see an expensive private physio
    I don't think your GP will refer you at all unless there is pain or obvious progression. Even if you had some form of scoliosis, it's very common in young women and most often there is no benefit in treatment.

    It's completely lame, but I can only suggest looking up "exercises for lordosis" online or something. Actually, it is possible you GP might be able to give you reliable sources of information, or at least reassure you. Someone more knowledgeable than me might come on the thread and be able to give you specific advice :p:
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    (Original post by Pigling)
    I don't think your GP will refer you at all unless there is pain or obvious progression. Even if you had some form of scoliosis, it's very common in young women and most often there is no benefit in treatment.

    It's completely lame, but I can only suggest looking up "exercises for lordosis" online or something. Actually, it is possible you GP might be able to give you reliable sources of information, or at least reassure you.

    Ive tried some exersises which strengthen glutes and abbs as apparantly in hyperlordosis these muscles are slack. I also train and keep fit most days and am not sure which exercises i should and shouldnt be doing (for example i dont know if squats will make it worse) for this thats why id like to speak to a physio really.
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    Ive tried some exersises which strengthen glutes and abbs as apparantly in hyperlordosis these muscles are slack. I also train and keep fit most days and am not sure which exercises i should and shouldnt be doing for this thats why id like to speak to a physio really.
    I'm sorry I can't help more If you think going to the GP might just help, then don't let concerns about being "silly" hold you back. Even if they are a bit rude (although hopefully they wouldn't be! It's just a tough job) they won't remember you.
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    (Original post by Pigling)
    It's completely lame, but I can only suggest looking up "exercises for lordosis" online or something.
    I think that's the best advice, regardless of what the cause is. The GP would most likely do the same, assuming its asymptomatic.

    I suspect its just something you'll have to live with to an extent. /totally unreliable internet advice/
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    this thats why id like to speak to a physio really.
    Go to the GP and ask to see a physio then. Whatever waiting time is, its a lot quicker than never, which is your alternative.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I think that's the best advice, regardless of what the cause is. The GP would most likely do the same, assuming its asymptomatic.

    I suspect its just something you'll have to live with to an extent. /totally unreliable internet advice/
    unless I say that its causing pain, which sometimes standing for long periods does!
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    unless I say that its causing pain, which sometimes standing for long periods does!
    Whose doesn't? But do mention it - might marginally push you up the physio list i suppose.
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    You do have an increased lordosis of your lumbar spine, however I would suggest it is postural. Your pelvis is in an anterior tilt (so basically making your bum stick out more), which naturally increases the lordosis of the lumbar spine. You probably will find that if you stand still for long periods of time that you get an achy back - because your back muscles are working primarily rather than balancing out with your abs.

    To correct you can do a few exercises, lie on your bed on your back and practice squashing your lumbar spine into the bed to flatten out your back, using your pelvis.

    You can also do this in sitting, by rocking your pelvis backwards and forwards, so really slump down, then sit up as tall as you can.

    Finally, if you have an exercise ball/gym ball, you can sit on that and leaving your feet in front, shoulder width apart, move the ball backwards and forwards with your pelvis again, so your not pushing with your feet, just aiming for small movements from your back/pelvis.
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    You do not need to 'correct' anything. My own statistics 95% of Black women have excessive lumbar lordosis, it is celebrated and a natural feature in my community.
    Ps it still doesn't have anything to do with belly weight
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    I want to know if I have that condition hyperlordosis or if I look the way I do because i have a short torso, im only 4ft11. My stomach sticks out when i stand naturally i can pull it in but it means tensing my abb muscles all the time. I think my stomach is fairly toned I can see the muscles but it still sticks out. When im wearing a baggy t shirt people have commented on how im 'getting a stomach' but my stomach is actually toned i get plenty of exercise. Ive also noticed that my stomach sticks out even more at the end of the day. Here are several pics, is my spine too curved would you say?
    Google 'anterior pelvic tilt' - it can cause lower stomach to stick out
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    (Original post by Maes Seren)
    You do have an increased lordosis of your lumbar spine, however I would suggest it is postural. Your pelvis is in an anterior tilt (so basically making your bum stick out more), which naturally increases the lordosis of the lumbar spine. You probably will find that if you stand still for long periods of time that you get an achy back - because your back muscles are working primarily rather than balancing out with your abs.

    To correct you can do a few exercises, lie on your bed on your back and practice squashing your lumbar spine into the bed to flatten out your back, using your pelvis.

    You can also do this in sitting, by rocking your pelvis backwards and forwards, so really slump down, then sit up as tall as you can.

    Finally, if you have an exercise ball/gym ball, you can sit on that and leaving your feet in front, shoulder width apart, move the ball backwards and forwards with your pelvis again, so your not pushing with your feet, just aiming for small movements from your back/pelvis.
    ok thanks, but what does practicing pushing the lumber area down physically do? I mean does it srengthen muscles so that it will correct it or is it merely just to practice good posture? I can stand straight if i practice but to keep my stomach flat when standing i have to strain it doesnt feel natural.

    Also if my pelvis is in anterier pelvic tilt how can it be postural as opposed to anatomical,
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    ok thanks, but what does practicing pushing the lumber area down physically do? I mean does it srengthen muscles so that it will correct it or is it merely just to practice good posture? I can stand straight if i practice but to keep my stomach flat when standing i have to strain it doesnt feel natural.

    Also if my pelvis is in anterier pelvic tilt how can it be postural as opposed to anatomical,
    It will feel unnatural, as you're used to standing like that. I'm hyperextended in my knees, and have a slight hyper lordosis as a result. I'm working on strengthening my knees so they don't go hyper, but also on strengthening my abs or rather,getting used to engaging them. Try looking on Pilates, and also ballet forums. They can be helpful n
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    ok thanks, but what does practicing pushing the lumber area down physically do? I mean does it srengthen muscles so that it will correct it or is it merely just to practice good posture? I can stand straight if i practice but to keep my stomach flat when standing i have to strain it doesnt feel natural.

    Also if my pelvis is in anterier pelvic tilt how can it be postural as opposed to anatomical,
    It's a postural habit which you (among many others, myself included) 'fall' into. You stand like that because its comfy, and then you find that it's natural to stand like that as your hip flexors will have become lax across the front of your body, and you tend to 'hang' on your hip ligaments rather than using muscles to maintain your posture. By doing pelvic tilts you correct the posture and in an essence become more aware of how to correct your posture, and therefore tends to become less habitual and the exercises will yes strengthen the muscles which hold your pelvis in the neutral position.

    If you're straining to keep your stomach flat when standing, I'd suggest that your just pulling in your abs? Am I right? Therefore leaving the pelvis where it is currently so your abs will have to strain harder and it will be less natural to maintain.
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    (Original post by flying plum)
    It will feel unnatural, as you're used to standing like that. I'm hyperextended in my knees, and have a slight hyper lordosis as a result. I'm working on strengthening my knees so they don't go hyper, but also on strengthening my abs or rather,getting used to engaging them. Try looking on Pilates, and also ballet forums. They can be helpful n
    I would suggest that it's the opposite and that your hyperextended knees are a result of the increased lordosis of your spine. Try the exercises I mentioned above, but it might help you to also put a hand either side of your hips and bring your pelvis into a neutral tilt and see what happens with your knees.
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    (Original post by Maes Seren)
    It's a postural habit which you (among many others, myself included) 'fall' into. You stand like that because its comfy, and then you find that it's natural to stand like that as your hip flexors will have become lax across the front of your body, and you tend to 'hang' on your hip ligaments rather than using muscles to maintain your posture. By doing pelvic tilts you correct the posture and in an essence become more aware of how to correct your posture, and therefore tends to become less habitual and the exercises will yes strengthen the muscles which hold your pelvis in the neutral position.

    If you're straining to keep your stomach flat when standing, I'd suggest that your just pulling in your abs? Am I right? Therefore leaving the pelvis where it is currently so your abs will have to strain harder and it will be less natural to maintain.
    Im pulling in my abbs a bit (which hinders breathing) but also it feels like im having to strecth /strain my back/stick bum out and create more curve in the lumber area in order to flatten my stomach
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    (Original post by inthedark1)
    Im pulling in my abbs a bit (which hinders breathing) but also it feels like im having to strecth /strain my back/stick bum out and create more curve in the lumber area in order to flatten my stomach
    That makes sense, that's not going to help you in the long run IMO, try the pelvic tilts I mentioned above instead, they're much smaller movements but you'll lessen the increased lordosis.
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    (Original post by Maes Seren)
    That makes sense, that's not going to help you in the long run IMO, try the pelvic tilts I mentioned above instead, they're much smaller movements but you'll lessen the increased lordosis.
    Thanks I will do, about 20 a day will be enough wont it. Another thing is i do a lot of running/sprint training and 2 weight sessions a week I dont know if any exercises i currently do will be making it worse or not. Then again Ive had this for years and years before the training. I'l do the pelvic tilts.

    Ive been trying some of these for the past several months exp the bridge exercise but havent noticed a different yet http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sp...tive-exercises

    Ive been looking up hyperlordosis and mine looks worse than some of the diagrams which show it lol.
 
 
 
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