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How do I get my sister to read? Watch

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    My parents and I are really concerned about my little sister. She seems so behind compared to her peers at the moment. She's in Year 1 and on Stage 2 on the Oxford Reading Tree books. We've been informed by her teacher that this is below the National Average (Stage 3 or 4) and most of her friends are on Stage 5, 6 and 7 by now. We looked at previous reports of my own and I was on Stage 7 at that age. My cousin who is dyslexic was on stage 4. We try so hard to get her to read but she really isn't interested. She gets very upset when we try to do anything at all with. We've tried so many things to try and encourage her as well. We really don't know what to do and neither do her teachers.


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    I'm just going to list what comes into my head:

    Picture books
    Books based on her favourite cartoon television shows
    Bed time stories? Do people still do these?
    Fairy tales

    I think it's impossible to force even a child to read so try to find something that interests her. There should be a book for everyone so no one is against 'reading' per se, just what they read.
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    (Original post by NoSpeakNewSpeak)
    My parents and I are really concerned about my little sister. She seems so behind compared to her peers at the moment. She's in Year 1 and on Stage 2 on the Oxford Reading Tree books. We've been informed by her teacher that this is below the National Average (Stage 3 or 4) and most of her friends are on Stage 5, 6 and 7 by now. We looked at previous reports of my own and I was on Stage 7 at that age. My cousin who is dyslexic was on stage 4. We try so hard to get her to read but she really isn't interested. She gets very upset when we try to do anything at all with. We've tried so many things to try and encourage her as well. We really don't know what to do and neither do her teachers.


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    Bed time stories. I used to get these from my dad, and I used to make up some stories with him too...
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    (Original post by NoSpeakNewSpeak)
    My parents and I are really concerned about my little sister. She seems so behind compared to her peers at the moment. She's in Year 1 and on Stage 2 on the Oxford Reading Tree books. We've been informed by her teacher that this is below the National Average (Stage 3 or 4) and most of her friends are on Stage 5, 6 and 7 by now. We looked at previous reports of my own and I was on Stage 7 at that age. My cousin who is dyslexic was on stage 4. We try so hard to get her to read but she really isn't interested. She gets very upset when we try to do anything at all with. We've tried so many things to try and encourage her as well. We really don't know what to do and neither do her teachers.


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    I work in a primary school and take readers from year 2 - quite a few of them are still on Oxford reading stage 3 and 4, so try not to worry too much, although it's easier said than done.

    As above, with bedtime stories and factual books about things she's interested in, what about leaving simple written instructions around the house for things she can do? Such as 'walk down the hall and get the post', 'Give the hamster some food' etc. It might sound boring but I've found children seem to enjoy it and it gives them a sense of importance and that they're being helpful too. Likewise, giving her a few items on a shopping list to find when she goes with your parents - eggs, milk, tea etc.

    I find a lot of children initially prefer reading using magnetic letters on a board - she can read them and rearrange them to get an understanding of how different words are formed and their meanings, ie witch, which. Understanding what they're reading is important as otherwise they won't get a sense of the storyline and lose interest.

    How is she at phonics? Often a lot of time spent on this is the first step to fluent reading - you can buy sound cards, or make your own, and once she knows these it should unravel the mystery of reading - just make sure you pronounce them correctly; mmmmmmmmm not muh, vvvvvvvvv not vuh etc.

    If it's any consolation, I didn't understand reading or phonics until I was nearly 8 - then it clicked, I've got a degree in English Lit and always have at least three books on the go! She'll get there with support.
 
 
 
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