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    So I'm studying AS at the moment and I regrettably got a C at GCSE in Maths because I didn't try at all. What I'm wondering is, how easy is it to get an A because I need it for Uni

    EDIT: I made it unclear, when I say I'm studying AS I meant it generally, I'm not studying AS Level Maths.
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    It's not easy. And nothing worth doing in life is easy. Plus that mind set isn't really one you should be going into Uni with. Uni is hard and you do really have to work to get good grade; you better start now!
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    (Original post by sophmay)
    It's not easy. And nothing worth doing in life is easy. Plus that mind set isn't really one you should be going into Uni with. Uni is hard and you do really have to work to get good grade; you better start now!
    Okay thanks, I guess I'll just have to rethink my whole career *sigh*


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    (Original post by LZS)
    Okay thanks, I guess I'll just have to rethink my whole career *sigh*


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    Not at all! But if you want things in life you need to try! Perhaps look into getting a tutor?
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    (Original post by sophmay)
    Not at all! But if you want things in life you need to try! Perhaps look into getting a tutor?
    I'd probably be able to self learn it, but idk when I'd be able to do the exam


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    (Original post by LZS)
    So I'm studying AS at the moment and I regrettably got a C at GCSE in Maths because I didn't try at all. What I'm wondering is, how easy is it to get an A because I need it for Uni


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    Really depends on your reason for getting a C. If you didn't understand the material at GCSE level, then you will really struggle. If you were capable, but just didn't work very hard then it will be possible but you really need to apply yourself because A level will build on the foundations from GCSE, especially in algebra and trig.
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    Grade C at GCSE is inadequate preparation for A Level mathematics. You may be the exception but it is almost unheard of for a GCSE C grade student to improve so much over two years that they secure an A Level A grade. A high proportion of GCSE C graders who attempt A Level do not grade at all.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Grade C at GCSE is inadequate preparation for A Level mathematics. You may be the exception but it is almost unheard of for a GCSE C grade student to improve so much over two years that they secure an A Level A grade. A high proportion of GCSE C graders who attempt A Level do not grade at all.
    I'd stretch to saying that even an A at GCSE is inadequate preparation. I finished my GCSE maths with an A grade at the end of year 10 and started doing AS Mathematics. I did no work for a couple of months and dropped it because I found it too challenging and I would probably not have graded. Ended up doing film studies GCSE instead and had the happiest and easiest time of my academic career.

    My point, although I'm taking a while and journeying a semi-autobiographical route, is that A-Level mathematics is hard even for people who found GCSE quite easy. I know someone who is gifted at mathematics, got full marks in every GCSE paper from no work and recently got an E in AS level maths. However, he did no work or preparation so probably deserved it.

    If you work hard enough then there's no reason you shouldn't be able to score at least a C or a B. An A, though, might be a stretch too far for someone who isn't already mathematically able.

    But what do I know? I dropped out because I couldn't hack it after a few weeks!
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    (Original post by davros)
    Really depends on your reason for getting a C. If you didn't understand the material at GCSE level, then you will really struggle. If you were capable, but just didn't work very hard then it will be possible but you really need to apply yourself because A level will build on the foundations from GCSE, especially in algebra and trig.
    No, I'm not doing Maths at A-Level. I'm already doing my A-Levels. I got a C in GCSE Maths, I have no intention of doing A-Level Maths, I just want to resit GCSE Maths and get an A.


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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Grade C at GCSE is inadequate preparation for A Level mathematics. You may be the exception but it is almost unheard of for a GCSE C grade student to improve so much over two years that they secure an A Level A grade. A high proportion of GCSE C graders who attempt A Level do not grade at all.
    No, haha. I'm resitting GCSE Maths, not doing A-Level Maths.


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    (Original post by guezelkuecuek)
    I'd stretch to saying that even an A at GCSE is inadequate preparation. I finished my GCSE maths with an A grade at the end of year 10 and started doing AS Mathematics. I did no work for a couple of months and dropped it because I found it too challenging and I would probably not have graded. Ended up doing film studies GCSE instead and had the happiest and easiest time of my academic career.

    My point, although I'm taking a while and journeying a semi-autobiographical route, is that A-Level mathematics is hard even for people who found GCSE quite easy. I know someone who is gifted at mathematics, got full marks in every GCSE paper from no work and recently got an E in AS level maths. However, he did no work or preparation so probably deserved it.

    If you work hard enough then there's no reason you shouldn't be able to score at least a C or a B. An A, though, might be a stretch too far for someone who isn't already mathematically able.

    But what do I know? I dropped out because I couldn't hack it after a few weeks!
    No, I'm not doing A-Level Maths. I just want to resit my Maths GCSE and get an A haha, I have no intention on doing Maths at A-Level


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    No one can really answer this question for you. Its all down to you and how much work you put in to get it.

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    (Original post by LZS)
    No, haha. I'm resitting GCSE Maths, not doing A-Level Maths.


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    Oops. In which case, if you didn't try before, then a B grade should be easily attainable and an A is a realistic goal.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Oops. In which case, if you didn't try before, then a B grade should be easily attainable and an A is a realistic goal.
    Haha, my fault. I made it a bit confusing and Okay, thanks for your help. Any revision tips?


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    (Original post by Hart1995)
    No one can really answer this question for you. Its all down to you and how much work you put in to get it.

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    True. Any revision tips?


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    (Original post by guezelkuecuek)
    My point, although I'm taking a while and journeying a semi-autobiographical route, is that A-Level mathematics is hard even for people who found GCSE quite easy. I know someone who is gifted at mathematics, got full marks in every GCSE paper from no work and recently got an E in AS level maths. However, he did no work or preparation so probably deserved it.
    The bold seems unlikely.
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    The bold seems unlikely.
    It seemed unlikely to me when he told me his result. I haven't done much A Level Maths so I don't know how different it is to GCSE but he genuinely used to full mark every paper with so little effort it hurt me.
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    (Original post by guezelkuecuek)
    It seemed unlikely to me when he told me his result. I haven't done much A Level Maths so I don't know how different it is to GCSE but he genuinely used to full mark every paper with so little effort it hurt me.
    I just mean that if he wasn't getting an A at A level, I doubt he was particularly gifted. I've met some people who really were good at maths, and they're just incredible.
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    Past papers are by far the best revision material for maths.

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