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    (Original post by Redolent)
    In my experience simply dressing in a "chavvy" way is neither a necessary or sufficient condition to be outright called a "chav" by the majority of people who use the word. Maybe it is just where I live.
    Even though, that dress style is called "chavvy". OK.
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    (Original post by Kutta)
    0% Benefits - Thats unrealistic though and causes problems to the vulnerable members of society like disabled people.

    Making people work for their benefits is a better solution, things like community service, helping charities, volunteering etc
    Or increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, to give people an incentive to get off benefits.
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    (Original post by Kibalchich)
    Even though, that dress style is called "chavvy". OK.
    I can only tell you what I have experienced for myself. The way I have seen the word commonly used, "chavvy" dressing style isn't enough to be labelled a "chav". In the same way doing something x does not necessarily make you x.

    Replace x with most adjectives.
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    (Original post by Redolent)
    I can only tell you what I have experienced for myself. The way I have seen the word commonly used, "chavvy" dressing style isn't enough to be labelled a "chav". In the same way doing something x does not necessarily make you x.

    Replace x with most adjectives.
    That's certainly not my experience, nor how I see the word used here. Its always associated with a style of dress. People then assume that if they see a group of people dressed in this style that they will be ignorant and anti-social.
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    (Original post by Kibalchich)
    The internet would appear to disagree with you.
    I haven't exactly been paying close attention. As I said, I can only tell you what I have experienced for myself.
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    (Original post by Kibalchich)
    That's certainly not my experience, nor how I see the word used here. Its always associated with a style of dress. People then assume that if they see a group of people dressed in this style that they will be ignorant and anti-social.
    Those assumptions are often correct though, aren't they?

    I'm not saying it's a good way for society to be, but it's how it is. Everyone makes assumptions about people based on appearance.
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    (Original post by Redolent)
    I haven't exactly been paying close attention. As I said, I can only tell you what I have experienced for myself.
    I've just edited my post as I changed my mind over what I wanted to say. Some net definitions do have behaviour as part of their definition. The problem with that, as I say above, is that then associates this behaviour with a particular style of dress. Its like saying that all goth/metal types are crazed killers, like at Columbine. Its a fashion, one associated with a particular socio-economic background, in the same way that emos are usually middle class. Can't we just call anti-social idiots, anti-social idiots? Why does it matter what they wear?
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    (Original post by Redolent)
    Those assumptions are often correct though, aren't they?
    No. Not IME. The people who do assume this tend to be middle class kids who, quite frankly are scared of working class people. If they dropped their prejudices they might learn something.

    (Original post by Redolent)
    I'm not saying it's a good way for society to be, but it's how it is. Everyone makes assumptions about people based on appearance.
    They do. To pretend this isn't often influenced by the media, politics, prejudice etc is naive.
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    (Original post by Ray Barone)
    Or increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, to give people an incentive to get off benefits.
    Knowing some people, that wont make a difference. They are happy to live in handouts and are happy without work. Also that would have a adverse effect on jobs available as firms would not advertise as many jobs exp in this economic climate
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    And how exactly do you suggest we rid our selves of these .....vile, problematic, chavtastic sponges? :borat:

    Would you like me to ring Ghostbusters or should you? It seems you would derive pleasure from this.

    EXTERMINATE ALL! :hoppy:

    :whip:
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    (Original post by EleanorKeats)
    I really hope you're just a troll . The word "chav" is really offensive, it's a derogatory term.
    I live in upper-middle class Surrey That's why it's very convenient and comfortable for people like you to 'defend' these cretins and appear tolerant... and everyone uses the term "chav" to describe people who live in council houses and engage in the behaviours you described. However nobody would reject these behaviours if the people in question were wealthy/- Yes they would...
    Being tough does not work and will not work. The US has some of the toughest prisons in the world and has one of the highest re-offence rates.
    Most "chavs" come from rough areas, have difficult home lives and little future prospects. (I've grown up in the worst areas in the country, and so did many of my friends. I'm talking real s***holes. Parents were and still are poor, and I went to crap schools. I don't behave disorderly,though. No excuse) ... By labelling and insulting them you are excluding them from a society which they already feel alienated from. They are doing that themselves...maybe ifthey stopped chucking cans of white lightening at passers-by, they wouldn't be alienated... What they really need is good education, youth projects and financial/social support. They get to go to school. Maybe not excellent schools. I went to TERRIBLE schools. However, they are given enough opportunity to work their way out of poverty. Lots of people are poor and live in rough areas, but that doesn't mean all poor people are antisocial yobs. ...
    There is a culture in this country of using 'chavs' as a scapegoat. They were not born that way, society made them that way.
    They don't stand for the working class but a majority of them come from poor working class backgrounds.
    It is high time our society took a more progressive and tolerant attitude.

    I'm not entirely sure why I bothered writing this as no doubt you'll disagree with me and continue to preach ignorance.
    I hope you realise your naive opinion is held only by a minority.
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    (Original post by Kibalchich)
    No. Not IME. The people who do assume this tend to be middle class kids who, quite frankly are scared of working class people. If they dropped their prejudices they might learn something.



    They do. To pretend this isn't often influenced by the media, politics, prejudice etc is naive.
    I'm not "pretending" anything, I think you might be misjudging my position. I come from a middle class background and most of the people I know aren't that close-minded about people who dress a certain way. Some are, yes, but it's not like everyone who uses the word "chav" is some working class hating snob.
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    Those of you defending 'chavs' AND have the audacity to even say chavs = working class people are clearly idiots who have never even met a 'chav', anyone can be a chav, even those with money.

    I suggest those of you defending them to watch Michael Caine's 'Harry Brown' - It portrays typical British Chavs perfectly.
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    (Original post by Wiska)
    Those of you defending 'chavs' AND have the audacity to even say chavs = working class people are clearly idiots who have never even met a 'chav', anyone can be a chav, even those with money.

    I suggest those of you defending them to watch Michael Caine's 'Harry Brown' - It portrays British Chavs perfectly.
    Yeah, that's right, everyone on my estate dresses like an emo.
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    (Original post by EleanorKeats)
    I really hope you're just a troll . The word "chav" is really offensive, it's a derogatory term.
    I live in upper-middle class Surrey and everyone uses the term "chav" to describe people who live in council houses and engage in the behaviours you described. However nobody would reject these behaviours if the people in question were wealthy/
    Being tough does not work and will not work. The US has some of the toughest prisons in the world and has one of the highest re-offence rates.
    Most "chavs" come from rough areas, have difficult home lives and little future prospects. By labelling and insulting them you are excluding them from a society which they already feel alienated from. What they really need is good education, youth projects and financial/social support.
    There is a culture in this country of using 'chavs' as a scapegoat. They were not born that way, society made them that way.
    They don't stand for the working class but a majority of them come from poor working class backgrounds.
    It is high time our society took a more progressive and tolerant attitude.

    I'm not entirely sure why I bothered writing this as no doubt you'll disagree with me and continue to preach ignorance.
    Strong chav to post content ratio.
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    (Original post by Redolent)
    I'm not "pretending" anything, I think you might be misjudging my position. I come from a middle class background and most of the people I know aren't that close-minded about people who dress a certain way. Some are, yes, but it's not like everyone who uses the word "chav" is some working class hating snob.
    No, I don't think everyone who uses the term is. It is used that way though. Have you read the Owen Jones book? Its a clumsy book and a bit preachy, but it does present a good argument IMO as to how the word is used to justify prejudice against poor people. Look at the hate towards unemployed people and people in council houses from many on these boards.
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    (Original post by Kibalchich)
    No, I don't think everyone who uses the term is. It is used that way though. Have you read the Owen Jones book? Its a clumsy book and a bit preachy, but it does present a good argument IMO as to how the word is used to justify prejudice against poor people. Look at the hate towards unemployed people and people in council houses from many on these boards.
    Yeah, I know what you mean. I haven't read the book, might get round to it at some point, but the list of books I want to get round to reading is pretty massive to be honest.
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    (Original post by Redolent)
    Yeah, I know what you mean. I haven't read the book, might get round to it at some point, but the list of books I want to get round to reading is pretty massive to be honest.
    Yeah, I know the feeling. I should be reading and not arsing about on here really.
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    (Original post by uktotalgamer)
    It's a drain on the UK, it's a drain on society, it's a drain on our culture. It's just awful.

    Most anti social crimes in the UK are committed by these morons, lets be tougher on them!

    They stand for the "working class"? No they don't. I'm working class and I despise them.

    It's about time we clamped down on these scumbags. All they do is drink or do drugs. They don't have jobs. The way they go on is appalling. It's time we clamped down.

    Oh, and the thing that annoys me. "Oh, they need a cuddle. They just need support." No they don't. They need a kick up the arse. They need a prison sentance. They need a reality check.

    These people are ruining this country by playing the "were working class" card.
    It's interesting that the countries with this attitude, eg UK and USA, tend to have worse crime problems and worse anti-social behaviour. Those countries that try to take a pragmatic approach seem to be able to deal with them more effectively. Just saying.
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    (Original post by Kibalchich)
    Yeah, I know the feeling. I should be reading and not arsing about on here really.
    Haha, exactly the same problem here.
 
 
 
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