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I've put on 16lbs...Oops. Watch

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    (Original post by -strawberry-)
    That's exactly what I'm like it's just it's been a lot of my friends birthdays recently so we've all been going out and it feels like 1 step forward 2 steps back
    When I know I'm gonna be out in the night, I sometimes compensate on my day intake.

    Saturdays are my usual nights, and as an example: I'll tend to skip breakfast either by sleeping through it or just drinking cups of tea, sans the sugar. I'll have a slightly larger lunch (but not enough to be equivalent to those "lost" breakfast calories). I have basketball - mainly pick-up games but still pretty intense - for a couple of hours. I'll have a not-so-heavy dinner later on, do a light jog on the treadmill - not better than an outdoor run, but it's just so I can catch up on the football before a quick lie down and then get ready to go out

    I'll get a telling off by some people, but I find that it does less damage this way.

    EDIT: I actually have two two-hour sessions (1-3pm; 6-8pm) of basketball going on on Saturdays for different teams. This burns a hell of a lot caloriewise, but it could also overwork me. I am aware of this anyway...
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    Switch coke to a sugar free alternative such as.. Yes you guessed it... Diet coke! or pepsi Max, Cut the chocolate and cakes and walk to school. You will be back to your normal self in no time, and as others suggested count your calories, but im guessing the cause of the excess calories in your diet is the coke, sweets and foods with high levels of fat such as pizza, chips and mayo which are high in calories.

    How I lost 10kg in 2 months:
    Male 90kg 1.75m tall Edit: Now 80Kg I only dieted for about 1.5 months October till Mid November

    8:00 AM Breakfast: 100g Rolled oats with 300ml milk to make Porridge
    12:20pm Lunch: 200g-250g Lean Meat (Usually Chicken Breast and used a teeny amount nandos marinade) 100g Carb (Alternated between sweet potatoes and brown rice) 200g+ Broccoli Boiled
    4:00 PM Dinner : 200g-250g Lean Meat (Usually Chicken Breast and used nandos marinade) 100g Carb (Alternated between sweet potatoes and brown rice) 200g+ Broccoli Boiled (Again)
    Snack: Tablespoon of peanut butter ( Quick way to boost calories :P)
    If my memory serves me correctly that was about 1800 calories

    Exercise : Just walking to school which takes about 30 mins

    Ate nothing else, drank about 2.5 litres of water a day, never felt hungry (Eating around half a kilo of food per sitting :P )
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    With regards to cardio, I would say that you don't have to make the jump straight to that amount.

    If you can, by all means do so, but if you think, "I could probably do this for two or three weeks, but I see myself being bored after that", then I would advise you to build up your cardio.

    Try something like the Couch-to-5K programme (http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml)if you want to start getting into running, for example. This builds you up, and you start off with around 20 to 30 minutes of alternate jogs and walks for three days a week, and after a few weeks, a full 5K run

    Approach your food intake in the same manner. Don't suddenly cut down massive amounts if you feel that you're the type to give in at some point. Your body may need to get used to having less food going in, and this may help you lose motivation.

    And one last thing. Have a cheat meal every now and then DON'T be discouraged if you "let yourself go" one day. I don't mean go wild and scoff the whole buffet, but sometimes it's good for your motivation if you sometimes give in to your urges.
    Agreed on the cardio part it get boring really fast Op if your near a gym go to classes or pick up a sport! swimming for me doesnt get boring because i make noises like a dolphin and try and stay at the bottom as long as possible... however im a ****ing freak ahahaha.
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    When I know I'm gonna be out in the night, I sometimes compensate on my day intake.

    Saturdays are my usual nights, and as an example: I'll tend to skip breakfast either by sleeping through it or just drinking cups of tea, sans the sugar. I'll have a slightly larger lunch (but not enough to be equivalent to those "lost" breakfast calories). I have basketball - mainly pick-up games but still pretty intense - for a couple of hours. I'll have a not-so-heavy dinner later on, do a light jog on the treadmill - not better than an outdoor run, but it's just so I can catch up on the football before a quick lie down and then get ready to go out

    I'll get a telling off by some people, but I find that it does less damage this way.
    That's a really good plan I just find I don't have the energy to do as much exercise as that in a day, and I'm only allowed 1600 calories if I'm trying to maintain my weight so I just find it really difficult!
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    When I know I'm gonna be out in the night, I sometimes compensate on my day intake.

    Saturdays are my usual nights, and as an example: I'll tend to skip breakfast either by sleeping through it or just drinking cups of tea, sans the sugar. I'll have a slightly larger lunch (but not enough to be equivalent to those "lost" breakfast calories). I have basketball - mainly pick-up games but still pretty intense - for a couple of hours. I'll have a not-so-heavy dinner later on, do a light jog on the treadmill - not better than an outdoor run, but it's just so I can catch up on the football before a quick lie down and then get ready to go out

    I'll get a telling off by some people, but I find that it does less damage this way.

    EDIT: I actually have two two-hour sessions (1-3pm; 6-8pm) of basketball going on on Saturdays for different teams. This burns a hell of a lot caloriewise, but it could also overwork me. I am aware of this anyway...
    Oh i bloody hate that word. How every other American journalist and his dog loves that word.
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    (Original post by AwsomePossum)
    Can you sustain yourself on 1300 calories though :/ have one day a week where you can absolute gorge yourself silly aha then you wont be as tempted to give up. I ate about 1900 calories and lost 5kg+ in about 6 months

    But then i put on muscle aswell so i have no idea how much fat i lost. Im not a chubby chubster anymore thats all i know :L
    Would that work though? I want to lose 2lb each week, won't it make a difference if I eat total crap once a week?

    And I can. but it won't be fun!
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    (Original post by Free.Help)
    Would that work though? I want to lose 2lb each week, won't it make a difference if I eat total crap once a week?

    And I can. but it won't be fun!
    Like I said, "cheat days" are good for your motivation/sanity. But don't take that too liberally, i.e. don't go on deficits for six days, only for your seventh to be a 1000-caloric plus.

    (Original post by silent ninja)
    Oh i bloody hate that word. How every other American journalist and his dog loves that word.
    I don't normally use that word to be honest, but it just popped in my head whilst typing. I must've been reading something which contained that word in. I get influenced like that sometimes. :lol:
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    It's pointless trying to cut out the crap completely, if that's what you like. You can't have a sustainable diet by depriving yourself of the naughty things you enjoy (that's not to say healthy food can't be enjoyable too). I try to stick to an 80/20 rule: 80% of what I eat is healthy and good for me, and 20% is made up of chocolate/burgers/wine/curry/etc. It makes a healthy diet more sustainable - but not a 'diet' in the weight-loss sense of the word. That said, you will eventually lose weight but you'll have also developed a way of eating which is sensible and sustainable.

    I think it also helps if you teach yourself to cook well. You start to appreciate that there is more to being healthy than salad and soup. In fact, healthy food can be damned tasty.

    Finally, only eat when you're hungry (but not starving) and until you're full (but not stuffed). I imagine that the pizza you have of an evening is more of an emotional eat than one which actually satisfies hunger.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    It's pointless trying to cut out the crap completely, if that's what you like. You can't have a sustainable diet by depriving yourself of the naughty things you enjoy (that's not to say healthy food can't be enjoyable too). I try to stick to an 80/20 rule: 80% of what I eat is healthy and good for me, and 20% is made up of chocolate/burgers/wine/curry/etc.
    To illustrate the basic idea of losing weight:

    In theory, you could be eating crap all day AND still lose the weight IF you are running on a deficit. Obviously I'm not saying this is recommended, as you will lose out on essential nutrients found in "proper" food.
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    In terms of food, I think you would be better having a filling (but healthy) breakfast, a small lunch, and an average dinner. I have porridge for breakfast, rarely eat at lunch, and eat whatever I'm given when I get home, and then I have fruit or a couple of biscuits. You should also try going to the gym or doing some other form of exercise. Try to walk wherever you can, and start by going to the gym once a week, and maybe build it up or just stay there for a longer time period. This stuff has helped me so I hope it'll help you. About 5 weeks ago I decided that I wanted to lose weight (I'm 5ft 4 and at the time I weighed 120lbs), and already I weigh 112lbs! If you struggle to maintain your diet, have one day off a week and eat as much as you want until you get full. Good luck! :3
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    Just a note about MyFitnessPal. It's fantastic, and of the 140lbs I've lost, 105lbs of that was with MFP.. but you have to be careful about portion sizes. For example if you log pasta without weighing it you may find you're eating double, or when you're spreading butter on bread you might be using too much etc. Everything adds up, so it's important that you're completely accurate. My parents actually got annoyed with me because I was that picky about weighing things, but it's the only way you can truly understand how much you're eating. Soon you'll get a feel of how much you can eat and you won't have to log in such detail, but certainly at the beginning it's brilliant.
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    (Original post by Anime Lover)
    In terms of food, I think you would be better having a filling (but healthy) breakfast, a small lunch, and an average dinner.
    Or move it around depending on your preferences. It will still work out.

    (Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
    Just a note about MyFitnessPal. It's fantastic, and of the 140lbs I've lost, 105lbs of that was with MFP.. but you have to be careful about portion sizes. For example if you log pasta without weighing it you may find you're eating double, or when you're spreading butter on bread you might be using too much etc. Everything adds up, so it's important that you're completely accurate. My parents actually got annoyed with me beuse I was that picky about weighing things, but it's the only way you can truly understand how much you're eating. Soon you'll get a feel of how much you can eat and you won't have to log in such detail, but certainly at the beginning it's brilliant.
    I agree. It wasn't as bad for me as, when I started it, I was using these measuring cups, as they're all I could find, having not realised that ml won't equate to in grams :lol: Luckily, my brother pointed out that we had a weighing scale so I can measure the food.
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    (Original post by Free.Help)
    I just weighed myself and was horrified to see I've put on 16lbs from my 'normal' weight! I've also put on 4 inches on my waist, and 3 on my hips.

    I am currently at 9st 6lbs (5'5). It may not sound like much, but being small build it really is. And I've never been this big in my entire life!

    I've always eaten loads of crap, but lately I've gotten worse. I skip breakfast, eat 2 sausage rolls, some chocolate for lunch, then for tea I've have curry/rice or pasta, then order small pizza/chips with mayo/coke EVERY night. And I may have an entire cake/12 wagan wheels in a day :cool:

    Anywho, my question is how to I keep myself motivated to shift this weight? I've tried a few times, but I just think, ahh who cares, and pick up a burger! I've been turning into a pizza face too, so it's also about beeing healthy. Motivation tips?
    The motivation has to come from within yourself. From reading your post it sounds like you, personally, honestly do not care about your weight gain and hence you'll likely always struggle to find the motivation to do anything about it until you genuinely care.
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    (Original post by Gingers6)
    Try a food diary. Write down everything you eat and if the list is long try to cut it in half the next day. Keeping a food diary makes you more aware of what you are eating (it might shock you!)

    THIS.

    Learning how much I used to eat was vile and keeping a diary helps cut so much!
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    (Original post by Free.Help)
    That's the plan, the problem is I have literally no money, I can spend about £5-£10 per week,
    You can get 7 portions of small pizza and chips with mayo, and a coke for £10?

    I need the number of your takeaway if all of that costs less than £1.50.
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    (Original post by Free.Help)
    I just weighed myself and was horrified to see I've put on 16lbs from my 'normal' weight! I've also put on 4 inches on my waist, and 3 on my hips.

    I am currently at 9st 6lbs (5'5). It may not sound like much, but being small build it really is. And I've never been this big in my entire life!

    I've always eaten loads of crap, but lately I've gotten worse. I skip breakfast, eat 2 sausage rolls, some chocolate for lunch, then for tea I've have curry/rice or pasta, then order small pizza/chips with mayo/coke EVERY night. And I may have an entire cake/12 wagan wheels in a day :cool:

    Anywho, my question is how to I keep myself motivated to shift this weight? I've tried a few times, but I just think, ahh who cares, and pick up a burger! I've been turning into a pizza face too, so it's also about beeing healthy. Motivation tips?
    I am in a similar position to you! My "normal" weight is 8st 6 to 8st 9 - that's the weight I personally feel good at. Last year I dropped to 7st 10 and at that point I realised I was too skinny, so decided to stop weighing myself and just eat healthily to let myself put on some more weight.

    However I had to be weighed at the doctors about 2 months ago and shock horror, I weighed in at 9st 11. Obviously that's a healthy, normal weight for a girl of my height (5'5 - 5'6), but since I thought I weighed between 8 and 9 stone, it was a bit of a shock! When I got home I tried on my smaller size 8 dresses and realised they didn't fit properly - I'm happy to be a size 10 but obviously, all my clothes are smaller so I want them to fit me nicely in time for summer. So I decided to get healthier and shed some of the weight I've put on. I feel a bit sort of clunky and clumsy with this added weight.

    I'm just going to outline what I've done, in the hope that you might also find it useful

    First of all, I sorted out my diet. Did some research: what foods promote weight loss, how many calories should I be aiming for, what foods should I avoid, etc. Also used my common sense and decided to eliminate the unhealthiest things from my diet: chocolate, crisps, takeaways, and so on. They are okay for an occasional treat, but no good on a regular basis, everyone knows that (but it's easy to get into the habit of eating them all the time!). The diet is the main area you need to work on - 12 Wagon Wheels in a day is extremely unhealthy!
    I personally decided to remove milk and cheese from my diet, just because I know they make me lethargic and obviously cheese is quite fatty. I will sometimes eat it at home every few weeks, but apart from that I never have it anymore. I also don't eat much meat - chicken every few days, no red meat, only Quorn, which is much healthier and has way less fat etc.

    So this is basically what I came up with:
    - Breakfast. Bowl of fruit. Combinations vary, but I'll usually include four of the following: blueberries, grapes, raspberries, kiwi, banana, apple. Sometimes I'll add in some plain quinoa, and I'll occasionally have half a wholewheat toasted muffin alongside it (the sort of crumpet-without-holes variety, not the cake muffin kind)
    - Lunch. First I'll have celery, carrots and cucumber dipped in humous, which I absolutely LOVE. I thought I would hate it but it's really yummy! Usually with a handful of grapes. Then veggie soup / couscous / quinoa / leftovers from dinner the night before
    - Snacks. Fruit, or celery etc dipped in humous again, or a smoothie
    - Dinner. I have a ton of different dinners so I can't list them all, basically I've made a list of low-fat, healthy balanced meals that I enjoy and I stick to cooking those. Things with Quorn are really good, couscous, quinoa, ratatouille, rice, lots of veg. Healthy but tasty - it's really important to me that I actually LIKE the food, otherwise there's no way I'd stick to it!

    I don't think you should say to yourself "I will NEVER eat chocolate again, I will NEVER eat junk food again", etc - it's just going to make you crave it more if you think it's forbidden. Allow yourself one cheat day a week at first, where you can have a pizza or a bar of chocolate or a bag of nuts or whatever. What you'll probably find is that (a) you'll be so proud of your hard work that you won't want it and/or (b) because you've gone without them, you "need" them less and will be quite happy to munch on fruit instead.

    As for working out, I started off with something extremely basic and worked up from there when I felt I was able to. I started with two videos on YouTube, both by someone called DeStorm - one is "the best home workout", the other is "butt workout". They start off slowly and that suited me! Takes about 30 mins to do it with minimum reps, no weights, at beginners level. As you build up it takes a bit longer. Start off once a day, maybe every other day, then go on to do it every day, incorporating more exercise into your day (gym? walking? classes? yoga? jogging? swimming? stair runs? other exercise videos? anything!)

    I am obviously not an expert at all, this is just something I've worked out which works for me personally (I have lost weight, I don't know how much yet but I am looking forward to finding out how much, I am a bit slimmer, my skin has noticeably improved, firmer legs, feel less lethargic.......etc!) - you might have to adjust it a bit to suit you.

    As for how to get motivated - have you got any nice pictures of you when you were at a healthier weight? Pin it up, alongside a post-it note with your target weight written on it. Try and get your friends / family / partner to help discourage you from being unhealthy. Buy a pretty dress a size too small. Think about being in a bikini in the summer (this one did it for me!). More importantly though, think about the health implications. Junk food is obviously having an impact on your skin, imagine how much better you'd feel with clear skin! There are so many other impacts on your body from eating unhealthy food too much - greasy hair, acne, heart issues, cholestorol, dull skin... A really long list (a quick Google search will give you a long and pretty worrying list of effects of eating crappy food all the time - I know it really worried me, anyway!!)

    Hmmmm, this is all I can think of right now - I hope it helps!
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    Personally I find it easier to think about getting healthy rather than losing weight, because when I try to lose weight I find myself thinking 'Ah sod it, I'm not THAT fat' but if I think about health, I can't find an excuse-I need to eat healthy and exercise and feel I'm doing something good, rather than NOT doing something I like.
    Myfitnesspal is really good I agree, used that a couple of times.
    I put on loads of weight when I first went to uni, just drank far too much beer !
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    To illustrate the basic idea of losing weight:

    In theory, you could be eating crap all day AND still lose the weight IF you are running on a deficit. Obviously I'm not saying this is recommended, as you will lose out on essential nutrients found in "proper" food.
    I get the basic idea of losing weight, but I firmly believe that the idea of "creating a calorie deficit" is the final step. I think you have to look beyond it and think how you're going to adapt that idea into a sensible, maintainable lifestyle.

    Getting caught up in calorie counting and being afraid to have the occasional chocolate bar is the principal reason people fail in their weight loss attempts, not because weight loss is particularly difficult. It's when food starts controlling you, rather than the other way around, that you feel worse about yourself and then weight loss becomes the hardest thing in the world.

    ...Which is pretty much the reason why I avoid counting calories. I know what is good for me and what isn't. I eat when I'm hungry and stop when I want no more. And I make sure that I pay attention to what I'm eating and keep the vast majority of it healthy. But if one day I fancy a mars bar, I damned well have one. Or two.

    Like the poster above me, I pay more attention to what is healthy than what is low-calorie. The two usually go hand-in-hand anyway, but I think it's an altogether more positive outlook on eating if you focus on putting good things in your body, rather than focusing on not putting bad things in it.
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    The key is probably usually going to be the science of Less cals in more calories out-but, getting obsessed with calories is often detrimental I agree.

    Slightly off topic but I recently have lost a bit of weight, the first bit was down to more exercise but once I realised I'd lost weight, I relaxed on my eating habits and ate more, didn't restrict the amounts I was eating as much because I was happy with my weight now.
    The result was, I lost MORE weight!It's as if not restricting myself as much meant I took in less calories, because I didn't let myself go hungry and was healthier, never felt bad about what I was eating because I wasn't trying to lose weight, and because of this, more weight came off.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I get the basic idea of losing weight, but I firmly believe that the idea of "creating a calorie deficit" is the final step. I think you have to look beyond it and think how you're going to adapt that idea into a sensible, maintainable lifestyle.

    Getting caught up in calorie counting and being afraid to have the occasional chocolate bar is the principal reason people fail in their weight loss attempts, not because weight loss is particularly difficult. It's when food starts controlling you, rather than the other way around, that you feel worse about yourself and then weight loss becomes the hardest thing in the world.

    ...Which is pretty much the reason why I avoid counting calories. I know what is good for me and what isn't. I eat when I'm hungry and stop when I want no more. And I make sure that I pay attention to what I'm eating and keep the vast majority of it healthy. But if one day I fancy a mars bar, I damned well have one. Or two.

    Like the poster above me, I pay more attention to what is healthy than what is low-calorie. The two usually go hand-in-hand anyway, but I think it's an altogether more positive outlook on eating if you focus on putting good things in your body, rather than focusing on not putting bad things in it.
    This is why I have particularly promoted having cheat days, but you're right - an occassional treat during the day is good too. Calorie counting, I find, is a good starting block for someone looking to lose weight/be healthy.

    Many a time I have seen people eating their lunches all proud and happy that they're eating healthy. Yes, they are, but at an excessive amount. Then later on they moan about how they're not losing weight.
 
 
 
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