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    (Original post by super121)
    Nope, we still haven't done that either
    lol agreed

    -just started today then again we do have 2 months and 10 days..
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    Do we need to learn the stuff on how ECGs are used to diagnose heart problems and what the graphs look like (pg 61 in the CGP revision guide)


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    (Original post by super121)
    Do we need to learn the stuff on how ECGs are used to diagnose heart problems and what the graphs look like (pg 61 in the CGP revision guide)


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    The specification says:

    Understand that cardiac muscle is myogenic and describe the normal electrical activity of the heart, including the roles of the sinoatrial node (SAN), the atrioventricular node (AVN) and the bundle of His, and how the use of electrocardiograms (ECGs) can aid the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other heart conditions.

    So yes, you should probably know what an ECG looks like. By understanding which wave corresponds to each action of the heart, you could deduce what's wrong with the heart if there's something missing or different (e.g. if the P wave is not present, then it is could be that atrial contraction cannot occur due to issues with the SAN node).
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    (Original post by Harantony)
    The specification says:

    Understand that cardiac muscle is myogenic and describe the normal electrical activity of the heart, including the roles of the sinoatrial node (SAN), the atrioventricular node (AVN) and the bundle of His, and how the use of electrocardiograms (ECGs) can aid the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other heart conditions.

    So yes, you should probably know what an ECG looks like. By understanding which wave corresponds to each action of the heart, you could deduce what's wrong with the heart if there's something missing or different (e.g. if the P wave is not present, then it is could be that atrial contraction cannot occur due to issues with the SAN node).
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Abod)
    Download this: deleted
    I have highlighted important points. Questions are added as sticky notes.
    I've stopped at paragraph 27.
    Quote me if you need me to add/edit any of the questions or highlighted parts.
    Updated, Added more questions.
    Download

    Download link has been updated. For some reason, mediafire blocked the file. Changed file name and re-uploaded it :P
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    (Original post by ItsDatGuy)
    Am i the only one that hasn't finished revising all the topics in unit 5 yet? Like i havn't even started the exercise bit not the brain and behaviour or drugs section Seems like i'm really behind
    We are only half way through topic 7 and 8 so you're not alone! For us the coursework took ages so now we are trying to catch up with the revision.

    Also thank you all the people that have shared possible questions for the pre release and given links to resources! They are very helpful!
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    (Original post by Abod)
    Updated, Added more questions.
    Download
    In the adaptations of naked mole rats to the environment bit, would the ability to withstand oxygen deprivation be one?

    Also later on, you mention that this is a behavioural adaptation? How is this? I thought it would be physiological.
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    (Original post by thegreenchildren)
    In the adaptations of naked mole rats to the environment bit, would the ability to withstand oxygen deprivation be one?

    Also later on, you mention that this is a behavioural adaptation? How is this? I thought it would be physiological.
    Yes, ability to withstand oxygen deprivation is one of the adaptations.

    I thought it would be physiological too, but "behavioural adaptations help organisms to survive better, particularly in difficult conditions" (ann fullick's book, chapter 4, pg 235)

    I'm not 100% sure it's Behavioural, I've asked this question (check page 2, 39th post) and I got one reply only.
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    (Original post by Abod)
    Yes, ability to withstand oxygen deprivation is one of the adaptations.

    I thought it would be physiological too, but "behavioural adaptations help organisms to survive better, particularly in difficult conditions" (ann fullick's book, chapter 4, pg 235)

    I'm not 100% sure it's Behavioural, I've asked this question (check page 2, 39th post) and I got one reply only.
    I say physiological because it's biochemistry within the organism. Behaviour would be something they do to help them survive (some sort of action)?

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    any one got questions and answers to the biology article?
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    (Original post by botanist)
    any one got questions and answers to the biology article?
    Got given questions today in school we'll be given answers I think next week
    I'll take pictures and upload later today
    although I think everyone will get them at some point..?

    Questions:
    Attached Images
       
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    upload the answers when you get them oki..
    our teacher is not giving any questions ..
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    (Original post by Hdizzle)
    Got given questions today in school we'll be given answers I think next week
    I'll take pictures and upload later today
    although I think everyone will get them at some point..?

    Questions:
    Thanks Hdizzle - those are really useful. I am bit stuck on:

    "Many features of the skin of the naked mole-rat, such as the lack of an insulating layer and the loosely folded morphological arrangement contribute to poikilothermic responses to changing temperatures of this mammal. Further evidence for poikilothermy in the naked mole-rat is indicated by the presence of pigment containing cells in the dermis, rather than the epidermis, as commonly occurs in homeotherms. Lack of fur is compensated by a thicker epidermal layer and a marked reduction in sweat glands."

    Namely:

    1. Why does the lack of ins. layer and the folded morph CONTRIBUTE to poikilothermic response.

    2. Why is the presence of pigment in the dermis EVIDENCE for poikilothermy? I don't really understand that at all. Why would a pigment being lower down prove it is an ectotherm?

    3. Lack of fur is compensated by a thicker epidermal layer and a marked reduction in sweat glands. This seems to be more straightforward - they don't want to get too cold without fur, so they have thick skin and sweat less. But that doesn't seem to explain much about them being poikilothermic / ectotherms.

    Any help much appreciated!
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    (Original post by TheNoobyPotato)
    I say physiological because it's biochemistry within the organism. Behaviour would be something they do to help them survive (some sort of action)?

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    Actually I would say it is an anatomical adaptation. It is in their genes, not changed over a lifetime. It is in Unit 2, topic 4.
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    (Original post by Ziggy_72)
    Actually I would say it is an anatomical adaptation. It is in their genes, not changed over a lifetime. It is in Unit 2, topic 4.
    I would say its physiological because it deals with the function of an organism, while anatomical deals with the structure of an organism. I can see why it's confusing everyone though, hopefully they won't ask us in the exam


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    (Original post by Ziggy_72)
    Actually I would say it is an anatomical adaptation. It is in their genes, not changed over a lifetime. It is in Unit 2, topic 4.
    I always thought:
    behaviour: something the organism does
    anatomical: a structure/physical feature of the organism
    physiology: biochemistry

    From the SNAB AS book, "behavioural adaptions are any actions by organisms which help them to survive", "physiological adaptations are features of the internal workings or organisms which help them to survive", "anatomical adaptions are the structures we can see when we observe or dissect an organism".

    So the ability to withstand oxygen deprivation.... is possibly any. It depends on how they can withstand it? What paragraph is it?

    Edit: 42. “We believe that the extreme resistance to oxygen deprivation is a result of evolutionary adaptations
    for surviving in a chronically low-oxygen environment,” said Park.
    Well that's not much help.
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    (Original post by TheNoobyPotato)
    I always thought:
    behaviour: something the organism does
    anatomical: a structure/physical feature of the organism
    physiology: biochemistry

    From the SNAB AS book, "behavioural adaptions are any actions by organisms which help them to survive", "physiological adaptations are features of the internal workings or organisms which help them to survive", "anatomical adaptions are the structures we can see when we observe or dissect an organism".

    So the ability to withstand oxygen deprivation.... is possibly any. It depends on how they can withstand it? What paragraph is it?

    Edit: 42. “We believe that the extreme resistance to oxygen deprivation is a result of evolutionary adaptations
    for surviving in a chronically low-oxygen environment,” said Park.
    Well that's not much help.
    I agree with you and I think that the naked mole rats do have certain physiological adaptations which enable them to withstand oxygen deprivation.
    However, I think that the article implies that naked mole rats also have anatomical adaptations. For example in paragraph no. 38, the text says:
    'But naked mole rats studied were found to show systemic hypoxia adaptations, such as in the lungs and blood ....
    So maybe mole rats are adapted to oxygen deprivation due to a combination of different types of adaptations rather than due to only one type of adaptation ???
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    (Original post by shumen9523)
    I agree with you and I think that the naked mole rats do have certain physiological adaptations which enable them to withstand oxygen deprivation.
    However, I think that the article implies that naked mole rats also have anatomical adaptations. For example in paragraph no. 38, the text says:
    'But naked mole rats studied were found to show systemic hypoxia adaptations, such as in the lungs and blood ....
    So maybe mole rats are adapted to oxygen deprivation due to a combination of different types of adaptations rather than due to only one type of adaptation ???
    Yeah that's anatomical. I agree actually, I think it's probably a number of adaptations and can be all of the 3.
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    (Original post by TheNoobyPotato)
    Yeah that's anatomical. I agree actually, I think it's probably a number of adaptations and can be all of the 3.
    Great - I think we have a grip on that issue. Now...

    2. Why is the presence of pigment in the dermis EVIDENCE for poikilothermy? I don't really understand that at all. Why would a pigment being lower down prove it is an ectotherm?

    Any clues?
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    (Original post by TheNoobyPotato)
    Yeah that's anatomical. I agree actually, I think it's probably a number of adaptations and can be all of the 3.

    Actually, I don't see how this could be anatomical adaptation?
    They did not develop lungs to help them withstand oxygen deprivation.

    Also, did you read this:

    41. All mammal fetuses live in a low-oxygen environment in the womb, and human infants continue to show brain resistance to oxygen deprivation for a brief time into early childhood. But naked mole rats, unlike other mammals, retain this ability into adulthood.

    This paragraph proves it's not anatomical adaptation. It's either physiological or behavioural.
 
 
 
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