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    Does a singular noun ending in 's' have a possessive ending in s's or simply s'? E. g. Thomas' cat or Thomas's cat? Might sound like a stupid question but I want to know because I'm writing my dissertation on Tacitus and Suetonius, and I don't want to be making an embarrassing mistake every time I write "Suetonius' writing style" or something I've searched the internet for ages, but every website seems to be saying something different so I'm really confused now!
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    I'm not sure but I believe either is acceptable. I'd go with the former though.
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    s'

    (1) name+'s <possession>

    (2) names+' <possession>

    (1) a name that doesn't have 's'. (2) a name that has 's'.
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    (Original post by ForgettingWhatsername)
    Does a singular noun ending in 's' have a possessive ending in s's or simply s'? E. g. Thomas' cat or Thomas's cat? Might sound like a stupid question but I want to know because I'm writing my dissertation on Tacitus and Suetonius, and I don't want to be making an embarrassing mistake every time I write "Suetonius' writing style" or something I've searched the internet for ages, but every website seems to be saying something different so I'm really confused now!
    If someones name ends in an 's' and you want to show that they have possession then you would place the apostrophe after the s on their name, because their is virtually no point in writing another 's.'

    However, if you have a name that doesn't end in 's' then you would need to have an 's' after the apostrophe.

    For example:

    James' ball <-- You put the apostrophe after the s, because his name ends in 's'

    Micheal's ball <-- You have to use the 's rule because his name doesn't end with an s.

    This doesn't just work with names, but I just used names as an example.

    I hope that helps


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    Oops, my name is Thomas and I've been using "Thomas's" for years! So have all my teachers on reports and the like!
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    Either is fine, but s' is more common in American English and s's is more common in English English.
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    It just looks more right to use the s' with Latin names like that.
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    I believe if it is a word/name ending in s, you add 's. For example, "Lewis's barbecue".
    However, if it is a plural, you add only '. For example, "Footballers' wages are over the top" or "Feminists' goal is equal rights."

    I've checked this before and this is the answer I've got. However, I'm not 100% as no one else I know does this.
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    Which one is correct:
    "However, the selection and avoidance is important..."

    "However, the selection and avoidance are important..."
 
 
 
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