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    can someone tell me why in hydrogen fuel cell, the equations differ when in alkali ?
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    correct



    No effect on Kc as Kc only changes by/ is affected by temperature.


    1) Balance the following equation using oxidation numbers

    Pt + HNO3 + HCl -----> H2ptCl6 + NO2 + H2O
    Not sure how I'd do this, run through it for me
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    (Original post by DudeBoy)
    Using quadratic equation to find pH

    Ka=[H+][A-]/[AH]
    Ka=[H+]^2/[AH-H+]
    Ka[AH-H+]=[H+]^2
    [H+]^2-Ka[-H+]-Ka[AH]
    Use quadratic
    I doubt it will come up but you never know
    It won't come up but if you do use it then it is OK
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    50cm cubed of 0.25 mol per dm cubed butanoic acid with 50cm cubed of 0.05 mol per dm cubed sodium hydroxide
    A buffer solution forms

    Calculate the pH of the buffer solution.

    The Ka of butanoic acid is 0.0000151

    Please could someome explain the method for this to me. Just had a little freak out when I got the beginning part of this question wrong.

    Thanks a lot
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    (Original post by DudeBoy)
    Not sure how I'd do this, run through it for me
    first work out which is oxidised and which is reduced
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    http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/65869-q...d-elements.pdf

    question 8, the calculation, how did they know the relationship between S2o3- and Cu is 1:1?
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/65869-q...d-elements.pdf

    question 8, the calculation, how did they know the relationship between S2o3- and Cu is 1:1?
    check this link it explains the question quite well
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAkFX...HdP3yQ8cbIo4De
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    (Original post by BrightStar57)
    check this link it explains the question quite well
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAkFX...HdP3yQ8cbIo4De
    Thank you,

    why is that the rate constant does not increase with temp?
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    Is it worth it doing the legacy papers?
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    (Original post by überambitious_ox)
    50cm cubed of 0.25 mol per dm cubed butanoic acid with 50cm cubed of 0.05 mol per dm cubed sodium hydroxide
    A buffer solution forms

    Calculate the pH of the buffer solution.

    The Ka of butanoic acid is 0.0000151

    Please could someome explain the method for this to me. Just had a little freak out when I got the beginning part of this question wrong.

    Thanks a lot
    I think I have an answer of 4.22, but I'm not sure if that's right, have you got a markscheme to check? I was thinking then I can go through the method?

    First off though, you definitely work out number of moles of the acid and the alkali, and from that, work out the number of moles of butanoate, and take that away from the number of moles of acid, to find how much is left over.

    edit: I can't see any problems, so I'll just put it down
    number of moles of acid = 0.0125 - 2.5x10^-3 = 0.01mol
    no. of moles of butanoate = 2.5x10^-3 mol

    then divide both by 0.1dm^3, that's the combined amount of solution
    put them into the Ka expression, find [H+], to get 6.04x10^-5 moldm^3
    then -log[H+]
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    Anyone wanna help?

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    does anyone know if we would ever be required to do Ka and all that with a dibasic acid or will it definitely always be mono basic?


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    (Original post by DudeBoy)
    Anyone wanna help?

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    ok, personally I'd write down the ionic equation, I got
    HCO3-(aq) + H+(aq) --> CO2(g) + H2O(l)
    Then I'd explain that adding water allows dissolves the sodium hydrogencarbonate (it says it's 0.5g, so it's solid), allowing the movement of ions in solution, so that the reaction between the H+ in citric acid and the hydrogen carbonate ion can take place.

    any thoughts?
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    (Original post by Pride)
    ok, personally I'd write down the ionic equation, I got
    HCO3-(aq) + H+(aq) --> CO2(g) + H2O(l)
    Then I'd explain that adding water allows dissolves the sodium hydrogencarbonate (it says it's 0.5g, so it's solid), allowing the movement of ions in solution, so that the reaction between the H+ in citric acid and the hydrogen carbonate ion can take place.

    any thoughts?
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    This the mark scheme, quite a hard question
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    (Original post by Pride)
    I think I have an answer of 4.22, but I'm not sure if that's right, have you got a markscheme to check? I was thinking then I can go through the method?

    First off though, you definitely work out number of moles of the acid and the alkali, and from that, work out the number of moles of butanoate, and take that away from the number of moles of acid, to find how much is left over.
    just remember, Kc=[H+]^2/[HA]
    4.22 is correct
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    Quick question - you know when you have cis/trans with 4 coordinate complex, are you allowed to put your 2 same groups (eg Cl-) on the bottom or on the actual sides ie vertically? Are you allowed either way as long as you do cis and trans?

    Thanks
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    Just a heads up, I think catalysts are gonna come up.
    Haber process, Fe
    Hydrogenation of alkenes, Ni
    Contact process, V2O5
    Decomposition of H2O2, MnO2
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    (Original post by Myda)
    Quick question - you know when you have cis/trans with 4 coordinate complex, are you allowed to put your 2 same groups (eg Cl-) on the bottom or on the actual sides ie vertically? Are you allowed either way as long as you do cis and trans?

    Thanks
    I think that would be fine IMO, but just check a marksheme and see what it says
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    (Original post by DudeBoy)
    I think that would be fine IMO, but just check a marksheme and see what it says
    Alright thanks. I couldn't find my papers to check for a question but I've got them now
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    (Original post by PythianLegume)
    What do you want to know about them?

    Basically, E=mcT is based around how much energy you need to heat a substance. The energy needed to raise by 1K is the same at all temperatures, and is equal to the constant c. Given that most reactions at A-Level occur in heavily diluted solutions, we tend to only focus on the energy needed to heat the water.

    Initial rates can be calculated in a number of ways. Either a concentration/time graph can be drawn, and a tangent drawn at t=0. The gradient of the line is the rate, because gradient = conc/time = rate. In 'clock reactions', the initial concentration is approximated by using 1/t, where t is the time for the reaction to complete. This isn't exact, it's just an approximation.

    Not sure about the Difference between a CLock Reaction and a Conc time graph? Specifically in the context of the 4 marker on January 2013.

    For E=mcT

    When you work out H=E/n

    I don't know what to choose as the number of moles i.e.

    NaOH + HCl ---> H2O + NaCL

    What is the number of moles I choose???
 
 
 
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