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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Correct


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    Give 3 properties of transition elements apart from forming coloured compounds (3)
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Give 3 properties of transition elements apart from forming coloured compounds (3)
    They are all metals so are shiny in appearance and have high densities and high melting and boiling points. They have variable oxidation states. They are able to conduct electricity.


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    They are all metals so are shiny in appearance and have high densities and high melting and boiling points. They have variable oxidation states. They are able to conduct electricity.


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    I will sadly, have to award you 0 marks , although your answers are correct, in my question I stated 3 and you exceeded 3 so have to penalise you

    my turn
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    I will sadly, have to award you 0 marks , although your answers are correct, in my question I stated 3 and you exceeded 3 so have to penalise you

    my turn
    Surely they wouldn't be allowed to do that in the exam?

    What are the 3 main types of electrochemical cells? (3)


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Surely they wouldn't be allowed to do that in the exam?

    What are the 3 main types of electrochemical cells? (3)


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    Do they penalise you? cause I read an examiner report and they said they would ignore the answer?


    1) non rechangeable cell
    2) rechargeable cell
    3) fuel cells
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Do they penalise you? cause I read an examiner report and they said they would ignore the answer?


    1) non rechangeable cell
    2) rechargeable cell
    3) fuel cells
    Oh, but you're showing you know more than what they want which surely couldn't be a bad thing? Oh well and that's correct


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Oh, but you're showing you know more than what they want which surely couldn't be a bad thing? Oh well and that's correct


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    Ok, ill give you a benefit of doubt because I am generous today from the sunshine,

    thanks

    Define:coordination number
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Ok, ill give you a benefit of doubt because I am generous today from the sunshine,

    thanks

    Define:coordination number
    Oh no, if its not allowed then be as harsh as they would be otherwise it'll be pointless really.

    A coordinate number is the total number of coordinate bonds (dative covalent) formed between the central metal ion and its ligands.


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Oh no, if its not allowed then be as harsh as they would be otherwise it'll be pointless really.

    A coordinate number is the total number of coordinate bonds (dative covalent) formed between the central metal ion and its ligands.


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    Perfect!

    my turn
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    Perfect!

    my turn
    Explain how the ionic size and charge effects the lattice enthalpy (3)


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Explain how the ionic size and charge effects the lattice enthalpy (3)


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    If the ionic sizes of the two (or more) ions are small then the ions pack more closely together and will result in a strong electrostatic attaction between oppositely charged ions and hence, more energy will be needed to break or sepeate the attractive forces between the ions, so more exothermic.

    Higher charge density the more exothermic the reaction will be as there is a strong attraction between the ions and more energy needed to break/separate forces.
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    If the ionic sizes of the two (or more) ions are small then the ions pack more closely together and will result in a strong electrostatic attaction between oppositely charged ions and hence, more energy will be needed to break or sepeate the attractive forces between the ions, so more exothermic.

    Higher charge density the more exothermic the reaction will be as there is a strong attraction between the ions and more energy needed to break/separate forces.
    Correct


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Correct


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    are you being a harsh marker?


    What is the colour of Mn2+(aq)
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    are you being a harsh marker?


    What is the colour of Mn2+(aq)
    I've been checking back to the book just to be certain, so I'm marking it fairly and it's pale pink but whenever I do experiments it's always appearing colourless, in solution.


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    I've been checking back to the book just to be certain, so I'm marking it fairly and it's pale pink but whenever I do experiments it's always appearing colourless, in solution.


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    perfect, well done you really are doing well with extra details

    my turn
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    perfect, well done you really are doing well with extra details

    my turn
    Okay, explain what types of indicators do we need to know about, what is the starting, ending and change colours and which indicators would you use in these cases. 1) strong base strong acid 2) weak base strong acid 3) weak acid strong base and finally 4) weak base and weak acid. (6)


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    Okay, explain what types of indicators do we need to know about, what is the starting, ending and change colours and which indicators would you use in these cases. 1) strong base strong acid 2) weak base strong acid 3) weak acid strong base and finally 4) weak base and weak acid. (6)


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    1) strong acid strong base
    use methyl orange and phenolphatelin
    starting orange, colourless, pink

    2) strong acid , weak base

    use methyorange
    colour changes from colourless to orange

    3) strong base, weak acid
    pheolphtalien
    colourless to pink

    4) weak acid, weak base
    no indicators used because there is no equivalence point and so PH range does not match vertical section of graph in titration curve
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    1) strong acid strong base
    use methyl orange and phenolphatelin
    starting orange, colourless, pink

    2) strong acid , weak base

    use methyorange
    colour changes from colourless to orange

    3) strong base, weak acid
    pheolphtalien
    colourless to pink

    4) weak acid, weak base
    no indicators used because there is no equivalence point and so PH range does not match vertical section of graph in titration curve
    That's all correct although for methyl orange I wouldn't say it goes from colourless to orange but red to orange and then going to yellow in the basic conditions, I don't think I explained it very well, sorry :-/


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    (Original post by MathsNerd1)
    That's all correct although for methyl orange I wouldn't say it goes from colourless to orange but red to orange and then going to yellow in the basic conditions, I don't think I explained it very well, sorry :-/


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    so for strong acid -strong base

    can you tell me the colour changes again please?

    why is water ligands repel less than chloride ligands(1)
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    (Original post by otrivine)
    so for strong acid -strong base

    can you tell me the colour changes again please?

    why is water ligands repel less than chloride ligands(1)
    You got them all correct, I was just asking for phenolphthalein the acidic colour, neutral colour and basic colour, same for methyl orange but you got all the actual combinations correct and such.

    Does it have to do with the fact chlorine is more electronegativity than either hydrogen or oxygen so will have a greater charge causing more repelling?


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