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What party do you support and why? [POLL] Watch

  • View Poll Results: What Party do you support?
    Conservative
    13
    23.64%
    Labour
    16
    29.09%
    Liberal Democrats
    7
    12.73%
    UKIP
    9
    16.36%
    The Green Party
    7
    12.73%
    BNP/EDL
    2
    3.64%
    British Communist Party
    1
    1.82%

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    What party do you support and why don't you support an opposing party? For example "I support Labour, because..."

    If your party isnt included, then you'll have to comment below.
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    UKIP because I want the UK to be free from the increasingly federal EU.

    After all we have trade deals and diplomacy already covered through our membership of the WTO and UN
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    Wheres the option for "none"?
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    Lib Dem through and through. WHY? Multi-lateralist, helping those get on an equal footing, reforming politics, civil liberties and reducing the state

    2 Parties merged to form it 25 years ago: the Liberals and the SDP. 10 years we were the only party to oppose the Iraq war
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    None of them.
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    (Original post by donleone2)
    Wheres the option for "none"?
    Because that would skew the poll, at current I am not interested if you're not voting.
    (Original post by Morgsie)
    Lib Dem through and through. WHY? Multi-lateralist, helping those get on an equal footing, reforming politics, civil liberties and reducing the state

    2 Parties merged to form it 25 years ago: the Liberals and the SDP.
    You'd really want to have Clegg as PM? If you want equal footing then wouldn't you be more left wing and Labour?
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    I'm not sure if it's because I'm politically naive or just very indecisive, but I've never found myself supporting just one party...I know that might sound a little strange, but I just can't choose between them. It seems like so many of their policies cross over, and part of me feels that if I were to base my support of a party even just on their more general 'themes' it wouldn't be a good way to go about things because it seems (to me, anyway) that quite often parties support policies that don't always go with their core tenets. I don't think I could choose one political party over any other unless there was a particular, specific policy that I was either very for or against- but then, even when I've done that, it's backfired on me; I voted Lib Dem in the last general election based on their spiel about not increasing tuition fees if they got in power, and we all know what happened with that....

    Anyway, I guess my point is, I feel a little lost when it comes to party politics. I have a fair few friends who are strong advocates of one party over the rest, but then they almost seem to stick their fingers in their ears whenever their party does something they wouldn't usually agree with. I really don't want to go down that route.

    But, as I said, although I know a bit about politics, I do feel as though I could learn a lot more in the area, and so perhaps with further research I might be able to come to a more stable conclusion.

    EDIT: Just seen a few people saying 'none', so I guess I'm (obviously) not the only person who's thinking along these lines...maybe?
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    Lib Dem through and through. WHY? Multi-lateralist, helping those get on an equal footing, reforming politics, civil liberties and reducing the state

    2 Parties merged to form it 25 years ago: the Liberals and the SDP.
    I took this view, and was swayed by Clegg's tuition fee promise to vote for them, so I did.

    What a wasted vote that was...

    I don't trust Labour, Tories or Lib Dem. They're all full of **** and lie with empty promises. They all have corrupt MP's and don't deserve my vote.

    It'll be a long, long time, before I ever vote for one of them in the future.

    (Original post by llacerta)
    ...
    I totally relate and agree with everything you've said. That's the exact stance that I take...
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    Because that would skew the poll, at current I am not interested if you're not voting.
    You'd really want to have Clegg as PM? If you want equal footing then wouldn't you be more left wing and Labour?
    I am not advocating quota's like Labour, Blair's babes in 1997.
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    (Original post by Rybee)
    I took this view, and was swayed by Clegg's tuition fee promise to vote for them, so I did.

    What a wasted vote that was...

    I don't trust Labour, Tories or Lib Dem. They're all full of **** and lie with empty promises. They all have corrupt MP's and don't deserve my vote.

    It'll be a long, long time, before I ever vote for one of them in the future.
    In Coalition you have to make compromises and Nick's hands was tied because those on the left wing were on the policy machinery hence the scrapping fees policy. It was labour who introduced them in the first place and the Tories wanted to go higher.

    75% of the 2010 manifesto has been implemented into Government Policy
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    I'm not sure if it's because I'm politically naive or just very indecisive, but I've never found myself supporting just one party...I know that might sound a little strange, but I just can't choose between them. It seems like so many of their policies cross over, and part of me feels that if I were to base my support of a party even just on their more general 'themes' it wouldn't be a good way to go about things because it seems (to me, anyway) that quite often parties support policies that don't always go with their core tenets. I don't think I could choose one political party over any other unless there was a particular, specific policy that I was either very for or against- but then, even when I've done that, it's backfired on me; I voted Lib Dem in the last general election based on their spiel about not increasing tuition fees if they got in power, and we all know what happened with that....

    Anyway, I guess my point is, I feel a little lost when it comes to party politics. I have a fair few friends who are strong advocates of one party over the rest, but then they almost seem to stick their fingers in their ears whenever their party does something they wouldn't usually agree with. I really don't want to go down that route.

    But, as I said, although I know a bit about politics, I do feel as though I could learn a lot more in the area, and so perhaps with further research I might be able to come to a more stable conclusion.

    EDIT: Just seen a few people saying 'none', so I guess I'm (obviously) not the only person who's thinking along these lines...maybe?
    Yes this pretty much sums up my position. I think there are quite a lot of people like us. I still can't believe the Lib Dems so spectacularly nose-dived, they pretty much had the whole younger generation's support at the last election and now they've switched them off.
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    What party do you support and why don't you support an opposing party? For example "I support Labour, because..."

    If your party isnt included, then you'll have to comment below.
    what party do you support?
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    (Original post by a729)
    UKIP because I want the UK to be free from the increasingly federal EU.

    After all we have trade deals and diplomacy already covered through our membership of the WTO and UN
    Misinformed of the EU. Parliament chose to pool sovereignty in certain areas and since 1973 all Governments ratified Treaties including your precious Margaret Thatcher who signed the Single European Act which established the Internal Market and introduced Qualified Majority Voting in the Council.

    If I had my way the UK would be integrating more in certain areas but retaining the opt-outs of the Economic and Monetary Union etc
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    Misinformed of the EU. Parliament chose to pool sovereignty in certain areas and since 1973 all Governments ratified Treaties including your precious Margaret Thatcher who signed the Single European Act which established the Internal Market and introduced Qualified Majority Voting in the Council.

    If I had my way the UK would be integrating more in certain areas but retaining the opt-outs of the Economic and Monetary Union etc
    Margaret Thatcher isn't that precious to me - her policies led to high prices for rail journeys, near economic collapse in regions of the UK dependent on coal and/or manufacturing and the poll tax and the fact she didn't take the UK out of the EU

    I'm not misinformed on the EU - the EU is getting more powerful with or without the arguably treasonous approval of various parliaments- at least in some countries there were referendums -think ROI which had to be repeated as they said NO the first time
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    In Coalition you have to make compromises and Nick's hands was tied because those on the left wing were on the policy machinery hence the scrapping fees policy. It was labour who introduced them in the first place and the Tories wanted to go higher.

    75% of the 2010 manifesto has been implemented into Government Policy
    Compromises or not it is completely stupid to make one of the central themes of your campaign "no more broken promises from politicians", and then completely do the opposite of one of your main promises straight after the election.



    The pledge said, in completely unambiguous terms, "I promise to vote against any increase in fees in the next parliament and to pressure the government to introduce a fairer alternative." There was no "if we get a majority" or "unless we end up in a coalition", it was a promise to vote against it regardless. He broke the promise thus trashing one of the main principles he claimed to be fighting for. And he actually said he plans to still be the leader at the next election, as if people are going to trust him again.
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    (Original post by a729)
    Margaret Thatcher isn't that precious to me - her policies led to high prices for rail journeys, near economic collapse in regions of the UK dependent on coal and/or manufacturing and the poll tax and the fact she didn't take the UK out of the EU

    I'm not misinformed on the EU - the EU is getting more powerful with or without the arguably treasonous approval of various parliaments- at least in some countries there were referendums -think ROI which had to be repeated as they said NO the first time
    It was Major who privatised the Railways. Ireland negotiated opt-outs and voted in favour second time twice, back in 2000 and 2009. UKIP are vile and they scaremonger people. They are also deluded when it comes to the practicalities if we withdraw, heaven forbid
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    In Coalition you have to make compromises and Nick's hands was tied because those on the left wing were on the policy machinery hence the scrapping fees policy. It was labour who introduced them in the first place and the Tories wanted to go higher.

    75% of the 2010 manifesto has been implemented into Government Policy
    Ahem...

    Name:  Nick-Clegg-tuition-fees-pledge.jpg
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    I wish there was a "none" option on the poll, it would be interesting to see how many people would go for it and how many of them supported Lib Dems at the last election.
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    Conservatives.
    At least they managed to retain a fraction of sanity, plus they have Boris, who is the only British politician who does not look irrelevant.
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    I'm a Conservative...

    My reasons for this would basically be a list of right wing ideals, so I'll leave it at that.
 
 
 
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