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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Well wanting "it" means a certain time/thing... So I'd say voulu
    Probably not the best example because of the ambiguity
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Elucidate!! :cool:
    Sounds like a word Octopus would use...:rolleyes:
    I shall replace "elaborate" with this new smoothhh piece of...vocab ;D :cool:
    But..."elucidate" and "elaborate" are not exact synonyms
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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    I have stuff to do, but people on this site just keep on being amusing...
    Could you please elucidate/elaborate on why you have been MIA recently?

    I've been meaning to query you regarding the pronunciation of the following French words:

    l'oiseau (bird?) & etroit (narrow?)

    Ich freue mich schon darauf, dein Antwort hierauf zu hören...
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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    But..."elucidate" and "elaborate" are not exact synonyms
    damnit...I've already misused that word in a post!
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    damnit...I've already misused that word in a post!
    Users of words should generally elucidate when mistakes like this are made But to elaborate would just be ****ing strange :lol:
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Describe in more depth
    English is for squares.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Describe in more depth
    Weeeeell...not necessarily.
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    English is for squares.
    I am a squuaaaare (nah, I'm an oval)
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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    Users of words should generally elucidate when mistakes like this are made But to elaborate would just be ****ing strange :lol:
    Mind your potty mouth, little boy.
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    (Original post by aasvogel)
    :eek: ¡son estupendas!
    Marvelloso, la gramática no es popular así ¡eres una persona raro!
    ¡Qué vergüenza! Pero es muy vale la pena .
    El español están en la misma caja que Inglés Así tenía que elegir Inglés, pero voy a estudiar francés, ¡lo que me encanta!
    ¡No soy rara! ¡La gramática es muy interesante! Voy a estudiar el francés también, y además la lengua inglesa, y la historia



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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Mind your potty mouth, little boy.
    I'm prosaically gifted, I swear :emo:
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    (Original post by tess_rach)
    ¡No soy rara! ¡La gramática es muy interesante! Voy a estudiar el francés también, y además la lengua inglesa, y la historia



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    Pienso que es muy interesante támbien, pero otras no la son. (not 100% sure if that's correct :s)

    ¡Bueno! Voy a estudiar la literature inglesa, las matemáticas, el francés y támbien las más matemáticas. (Further Maths? How would you say that?!)
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    (Original post by MangoFreak)
    I'm prosaically gifted, I swear :emo:
    sure..:rolleyes:
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    Hey guys.
    Just wanted some advice and figured this would be the place to ask

    Firstly, I don't speak any foreign languages. I am being offered to learn GCSE Spanish next year (my A2 year) but apart from that I haven't had the chance yet.

    I really want to study languages. It's the one thing I think I would enjoy most at University but I obviously can't go about doing that with my current academic profile. Do you guys have any ideas? I would love to learn a couple of Western European languages Like French, Spanish or Portuguese initially. I am teaching myself the Hiragana script right now which is proving fun. I have learnt all the characters and can identify each of them instantly - it's taken about 2 weeks of 20 mins a day so I'm not sure if I have an aptitude for it or not but I thought it was pretty fast - either way, I'm thoroughly enjoying it. I also started learning French on Rosetta Stone and am finding this relatively easy. Maybe it's meant to be like that but I thought I'd let you know how I think I'm doing to give you an idea of what sort of situation I'm in

    Thanks a lot for any advice

    EDIT: In my lifetime, I would love to have some proficiency in French, Spanish, Japanese, Portuguese and Arabic, if that helps. Maybe my goals will change but atm that's the plan
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Hey guys.
    Just wanted some advice and figured this would be the place to ask

    Firstly, I don't speak any foreign languages. I am being offered to learn GCSE Spanish next year (my A2 year) but apart from that I haven't had the chance yet.

    I really want to study languages. It's the one thing I think I would enjoy most at University but I obviously can't go about doing that with my current academic profile. Do you guys have any ideas? I would love to learn a couple of Western European languages Like French, Spanish or Portuguese initially. I am teaching myself the Hiragana script right now which is proving fun. I have learnt all the characters and can identify each of them instantly - it's taken about 2 weeks of 20 mins a day so I'm not sure if I have an aptitude for it or not but I thought it was pretty fast - either way, I'm thoroughly enjoying it. I also started learning French on Rosetta Stone and am finding this relatively easy. Maybe it's meant to be like that but I thought I'd let you know how I think I'm doing to give you an idea of what sort of situation I'm in

    Thanks a lot for any advice
    First of all, welcome.

    If you're being offered a GCSE in Spanish, grab the opportunity with both hands. If you can get a GCSE in a language, that opens the door to starting a language from scratch at University, depending on the university, or at least allows you a good introduction into serious self-study or evening classes whatever. If you really want to do it, it should be a good investment of your time. And then that at least opens the door to other opportunities at university or to other areas. It's an essential platform.

    In terms of Rosetta Stone, you can get materials for 10% the price at 200% the yield. A usage of many different methods (there's another big post I made a couple of pages back that may also be some use to you), I think, would be much more beneficial.

    In terms of languages to learn, learn what interests you. What do you find interesting culturally, linguistically etc? You'll do the best in the languages which interest you the most. There is no point in learning a language for external reasons, it has to be personal to you. I'm not entirely sure on the specifics of whether you can do an ab initio language at specific universities, but getting that GCSE is the first important step for moving forward.

    One last thing - make sure this is really what you want. This is A2 year, you need to do your best to actually get to uni, and this GCSE could be a distraction if you change your mind. However, I would say that you have a lot of passion for it, so I think you should go for it.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    First of all, welcome.

    If you're being offered a GCSE in Spanish, grab the opportunity with both hands. If you can get a GCSE in a language, that opens the door to starting a language from scratch at University, depending on the university, or at least allows you a good introduction into serious self-study or evening classes whatever. If you really want to do it, it should be a good investment of your time. And then that at least opens the door to other opportunities at university or to other areas. It's an essential platform.

    In terms of Rosetta Stone, you can get materials for 10% the price at 200% the yield. A usage of many different methods (there's another big post I made a couple of pages back that may also be some use to you), I think, would be much more beneficial.

    In terms of languages to learn, learn what interests you. What do you find interesting culturally, linguistically etc? You'll do the best in the languages which interest you the most. There is no point in learning a language for external reasons, it has to be personal to you. I'm not entirely sure on the specifics of whether you can do an ab initio language at specific universities, but getting that GCSE is the first important step for moving forward.

    One last thing - make sure this is really what you want. This is A2 year, you need to do your best to actually get to uni, and this GCSE could be a distraction if you change your mind. However, I would say that you have a lot of passion for it, so I think you should go for it.

    Good luck!
    Thank you very much. Since my uncle is in the military he got the Rosetta Stone for me very cheaply in Afghanistan!

    Do you know of many 'foundation' courses' for Languages? I think Durham and Hull do one each so I've emailed an inquiry to them both to ask what they think about someone in my position applying for it. I'd love for there to be a few more though!

    If not, I'm going to try to take up Japanese language modules at University and try to get a year abroad there.

    I have been looking into the military as a linguist because they offer to teach you languages like Farsi and Arabic up to interpreter level which would be amazing.
    If I progressed up their 'ladder' I could also learn other languages closer to home like the Spanish and French so I might consider that a real option.

    As I edited in to my post, the languages that sound most interesting to me are definitely Japanese and Arabic first. The characters and sounds in both are beautiful. My girlfriend is Japanese so that kind of helps my enthusiasm for that (though she doesn't want to teach me which sucks!) and I am fascinated by the stuff happening in the Middle East. Being able to read Arabic sources/understand Arabic videos etc would be a great tool. Then I also like the sound of French, Spanish and Portuguese. A little more obvious and a little easier to learn, maybe so I'm not so excited about them right now but I would really like to have a couple Western European languages under my belt at some point!

    I'll have a look for your post and will have a thorough read. Thanks for directing me that way. I really appreciate your help.
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Thank you very much. Since my uncle is in the military he got the Rosetta Stone for me very cheaply in Afghanistan!

    Do you know of many 'foundation' courses' for Languages? I think Durham and Hull do one each so I've emailed an inquiry to them both to ask what they think about someone in my position applying for it. I'd love for there to be a few more though!

    If not, I'm going to try to take up Japanese language modules at University and try to get a year abroad there.

    I have been looking into the military as a linguist because they offer to teach you languages like Farsi and Arabic up to interpreter level which would be amazing.
    If I progressed up their 'ladder' I could also learn other languages closer to home like the Spanish and French so I might consider that a real option.

    As I edited in to my post, the languages that sound most interesting to me are definitely Japanese and Arabic first. The characters and sounds in both are beautiful. My girlfriend is Japanese so that kind of helps my enthusiasm for that (though she doesn't want to teach me which sucks!) and I am fascinated by the stuff happening in the Middle East. Being able to read Arabic sources/understand Arabic videos etc would be a great tool. Then I also like the sound of French, Spanish and Portuguese. A little more obvious and a little easier to learn, maybe so I'm not so excited about them right now but I would really like to have a couple Western European languages under my belt at some point!

    I'll have a look for your post and will have a thorough read. Thanks for directing me that way. I really appreciate your help.
    Well...I have more beef with Rosetta Stone bar the price, but anything is useful, as long as you use it in conjunction with a lot of other materials!

    I'm afraid I don't, but it sounds like you're going the good way about it already. Just inquire around and see if you can get something that suits your major. And a YA is a great opportunity, even if you're not majoring in a language, so that's a great idea.

    Wow, that sounds pretty good. Do you know what you need to get into those sorts of programmes? And Arabic is a wonderfully interesting language, I'd love to delve into it further if I had the chance, but I have about 1024872919 other languages on my mind... But the geopolitics in Arabia is certainly a good reason to learn some of at least formal Arabic if you really want to delve past the Western Media (although this might take a while, it is a pretty heavy language ).

    Not a problem, if you're interested, stick around if you do decide to take up the GCSE. This thread is a great thread for just general grammar/usage/silly stuff advice. Good luck! ^^
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Thank you very much. Since my uncle is in the military he got the Rosetta Stone for me very cheaply in Afghanistan!

    Do you know of many 'foundation' courses' for Languages? I think Durham and Hull do one each so I've emailed an inquiry to them both to ask what they think about someone in my position applying for it. I'd love for there to be a few more though!

    If not, I'm going to try to take up Japanese language modules at University and try to get a year abroad there.

    I have been looking into the military as a linguist because they offer to teach you languages like Farsi and Arabic up to interpreter level which would be amazing.
    If I progressed up their 'ladder' I could also learn other languages closer to home like the Spanish and French so I might consider that a real option.

    As I edited in to my post, the languages that sound most interesting to me are definitely Japanese and Arabic first. The characters and sounds in both are beautiful. My girlfriend is Japanese so that kind of helps my enthusiasm for that (though she doesn't want to teach me which sucks!) and I am fascinated by the stuff happening in the Middle East. Being able to read Arabic sources/understand Arabic videos etc would be a great tool. Then I also like the sound of French, Spanish and Portuguese. A little more obvious and a little easier to learn, maybe so I'm not so excited about them right now but I would really like to have a couple Western European languages under my belt at some point!

    I'll have a look for your post and will have a thorough read. Thanks for directing me that way. I really appreciate your help.
    Most Japanese and Arabic courses are ab initio and do not therefore require the language even at GCSE. In fact a few of them would rather you didn't have GCSE or A-level, because they would rather you didn't pick up bad habits/bad grammar before you learn the language at uni. Many will require a language at GCSE, a couple may require a language at AS or A2 to prove your ability, but it certainly shouldn't be the case for all of them. If you want to do a whole degree in a language like Japanese or Arabic (or maybe both?), you should absolutely be able to without doing a foundation year or anything.

    Edit: Speaking as someone who first applied for 'Japanese', 'Japanese and Spanish' and 'Japanese with Spanish', and then to German and Spanish courses the following year after a change of heart.

    Edit 2: I've had a little look for you on UCAS. Arabic & Japanese would require you to have proven your ability beyond GCSE (which is fair enough, it's a tough combo). However, I had a look for just Japanese (as an example), and Leeds, Newcastle, Sheffield and SOAS will take you with just a B in a foreign language GCSE (at least some say a B, others don't stipulate). You can't generally take two languages ab initio, just so you know, and French is not generally offered as an ab initio option, and requires you to have a good grade at A-level in it (though there are a select few places that offer it ab initio).
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)

    Could you please elucidate/elaborate on why you have been MIA recently? 

    I've been meaning to query you regarding the pronunciation of the following French words:

    l'oiseau (bird?) & etroit (narrow?)

    Ich freue mich schon darauf, dein Antwort hierauf zu hören...
    Je suis malade. Ich bin krank und ich musste einen Teil einer Aufgabe machen. Ich habe noch fünfundsiebzig Wörter über biologische Landwirtschaft und fünfhundert *sodding* Worter über die umweltfreundliche Auswirkungen von *Willow coppicing* zu schreiben.

    Regarding l'oiseau and etroit: **** knows. See, I can use monosyllabic expletives of Anglo-Saxon derivation, too! I am truly multitalented.

    P.S.: elucidate is great for crosswords. For some reason, compilers used to seem quite fond of it. If you're trying to work out whether you can use it in a particular sentence, see if "shed light on it" will work in the same place. If yes, then you can generally use elucidate.

    Il faut que je dors maintenant!
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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    Je suis malade. Ich bin krank und ich musste einen Teil einer Aufgabe machen. Ich habe noch fünfundsiebzig Wörter über biologische Landwirtschaft und fünfhundert *sodding* Worter über die ümweltfreundliche Auswirkungen von *Willow coppicing* zu schreiben.

    Regarding l'oiseau and etroit: **** knows. See, I can use monosyllabic expletives of Anglo-Saxon derivation, too! I am truly multitalented.

    P.S.: elucidate is great for crosswords. For some reason, compilers used to seem quite fond of it. If you're trying to work out whether you can use it in a particular sentence, see if "shed light on it" will work in the same place. If yes, then you can generally use elucidate.

    Il faut que je dorme maintenant!
    Oiseau - 'wah-zoh'
    Étroit - 'eh-tRwah' (R = guzzly French R sound)
 
 
 
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