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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    Google the Sony Ericsson complaints department?
    I don't get the joke...
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I don't get the joke...
    It's not a particularly good one, so don't worry.
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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    It's not a particularly good one, so don't worry.
    :ahee:

    Je suis désolé...
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Oh... But that's active?
    Yes, it's a common way of avoiding the passive. We do it in English
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    There's two types:

    Object + Preterite Ser + Past Participle (+ por + agent)

    OR

    Se + Reflexive 3rd Person Verb + Object
    What's the agent? We haven't done this but I have a feeling that it might be useful for A-level next year.


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    (Original post by tess_rach)
    What's the agent? We haven't done this but I have a feeling that it might be useful for A-level next year.


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    It's the "doer" of the sentence.

    The potatoes were sold by the spaceman.

    "spaceman" being the agent.
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    Yes, it's a common way of avoiding the passive. We do it in English
    But I thought I was making passive sentences :shakecane:

    (Original post by tess_rach)
    What's the agent? We haven't done this but I have a feeling that it might be useful for A-level next year.


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    Who(or what) ever the action was done by.

    Eg

    He was eaten by the dogs

    The dogs are the agents.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    But I thought I was making passive sentences :shakecane:
    They don't use the passive though, they use what constantmeowage (and MangoFreak?) have been telling you. It is their passive.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    But I thought I was making passive sentences :shakecane:



    Who(or what) ever the action was done by.

    Eg

    He was eaten by the dogs

    The dogs are the agents.
    Yes...but the passive tense in its proper form isn't used as much as in English, so I then went to demonstrate all the ways one avoids the passive in Spanish, and one of them is to turn it into a 'they' sentence, where 'they' is equivalent to using 'on' in French.

    Eg:

    I was kicked in the stomach
    WE CAN EQUALLY SAY
    They kicked me in the stomach

    They do this in Spanish a bit more often.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    They don't use the passive though, they use what constantmeowage (and MangoFreak?) have been telling you. It is their passive.
    I know that, but I was practising forming "the passive" passive... Ie the literal equivalent.

    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    Yes...but the passive tense in its proper form isn't used as much as in English, so I then went to demonstrate all the ways one avoids the passive in Spanish, and one of them is to turn it into a 'they' sentence, where 'they' is equivalent to using 'on' in French.

    Eg:

    I was kicked in the stomach
    WE CAN EQUALLY SAY
    They kicked me in the stomach

    They do this in Spanish a bit more often.
    Okay!

    So:

    Yo fue *kicked* in the stomach

    How do I form the other version?

    Se me hablan *kicked* in the stomach?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I know that, but I was practising forming "the passive" passive... Ie the literal equivalent.



    Okay!

    So:

    Yo fue *kicked* in the stomach

    How do I form the other version?

    Se me hablan *kicked* in the stomach?
    Fui atropellado en la calle - I was ran over in the street

    Me atropellaron en la calle - They ran me over in the street.

    And you can't learn the passive tense in Spanish without learning how to avoid it - since they don't use the real passive half as much, it makes more sense to practise the ways in which it is made in Spanish which is the ways I've outlined.
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    Fui atropellado en la calle - I was ran over in the street

    Me atropellaron en la calle - They ran me over in the street.

    And you can't learn the passive tense in Spanish without learning how to avoid it - since they don't use the real passive half as much, it makes more sense to practise the ways in which it is made in Spanish which is the ways I've outlined.
    Aah, the preterite! I keep forgetting it exists

    He was thrown off the roof.
    They threw me off the roof.

    But I thought, if we didn't know the agent we use se?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Aah, the preterite! I keep forgetting it exists

    He was thrown off the roof.
    They threw me off the roof.

    But I thought, if we didn't know the agent we use se?
    Aye, but that only works for things in the third person. We can't use 'me' as a passive, so we have to do it like this.
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    Aye, but that only works for things in the third person. We can't use 'me' as a passive, so we have to do it like this.
    I think I've finally got it :yep:

    é, aste, ó, amos, asteis, aron

    I remember
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I think I've finally got it :yep:

    é, aste, ó, amos, asteis, aron

    I remember
    That's only for -ar verbs and don't forget the ones with irregular stems
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    That's only for -ar verbs and don't forget the ones with irregular stems
    the other ones are similar...

    Viví
    Viviste
    Vivió
    Vivimos
    Vivisteis (wrong?)
    Vivieron

    Hube
    Hubiste
    Hubo
    Hubimos
    Hubisteis
    Hubieron
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    the other ones are similar...

    Viví
    Viviste
    Vivió
    Vivimos
    Vivisteis (wrong?)
    Vivieron

    Hube
    Hubiste
    Hubo
    Hubimos
    Hubisteis
    Hubieron
    You'd never use any of those bar hubo though, I don't think.
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    You'd never use any of those bar hubo though, I don't think.
    Yay! They confuse me anyway, what would it mean... I had? Hmmm
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Yay! They confuse me anyway, what would it mean... I had? Hmmm
    It's for the preterite pluperfect, but I think it's largely literary (like the future subjunctive).
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    Hello. It's me! I have a special question in terms of the English language, namely when the letter 'y' is used as vowel. In German language there is no 'y' as vowel in existence. On the contrary: this letter is one of the rarest ones in German.
 
 
 
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