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    (Original post by YummyDietician)
    Oh thanks thanks thanks! Aaah thanks for all this help! I thought the verb swapping was in the first clause I need to re-read over my notes lol

    Is 'om te' the Dutch equivalent of '-ing'? And je and jou - unstressed and stressed? When do you use them? I've searched up so much about it :/ but I don't understand... :'( oh and jij.. And ze and zij! And all others :P wow I really fail -_-



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    You're very very very welcome!!

    I'm really hopeless at explaining stuff But if you give me an example sentence I can be of more help to you
    You seem thirsty for linguistic knowledge, I likee (a)
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    While y'all are nervously awaiting your exam results
    I'm just really looking forward to the IAAF World Championships next month
    #Moscow #Athletics
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    (Original post by tess_rach)
    Thanks and you'll be surprised to find out that you're the second person in two days to be surprised that I don't know the subjunctive!


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    Oh no, I'm not surprised at all. I had no idea what the subjunctive was and how to use it at the end of GCSE
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    I already had open day just now!:eek: sorry, didn't get to use it.

    So, I got permission for F.Maths and Stats.

    Need to do Spanish in September to persuade them.

    French, I totally impressed the teacher :cool:

    She asked why I chose French, and I replied, would you like me to answer in French or English. I then spoke some French.

    She thought I went to some good school :ahee: then we told her about our ****ty ome
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I already had open day just now!:eek: sorry, didn't get to use it.

    So, I got permission for F.Maths and Stats.

    Need to do Spanish in September to persuade them.

    French, I totally impressed the teacher :cool:

    She asked why I chose French, and I replied, would you like me to answer in French or English. I then spoke some French.

    She thought I went to some good school :ahee: then we told her about our ****ty ome
    :woo: :woo: What was your response in French? :P
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    :woo: :woo: What was your response in French? :P
    Something about not being able to speak French, but wanting to learn and become a polyglot! I used the subjunctive of course I was switching between the languages it was greAt! I understood her to...

    But yeah, the Spanish teacher was outside on my way to physics, and I said something and she asked if I was doing Spanish I replied no in Spanish (didn't think to start speaking to her)
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    Can someone explain the difference between between the genitive pronouns and the possesive pronouns (ie. mein, dein) declined with the genitive ending for ein?? Hope this makes sense
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    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Can someone explain the difference between between the genitive pronouns and the possesive pronouns (ie. mein, dein) declined with the genitive ending for ein?? Hope this makes sense
    The genitive case of mein, dein, sein goes like ein

    Masculine Gen
    meines, deines, seines, eines

    Feminine Gen
    meiner, deiner, seiner, einer

    Neuter Gen
    meines, deines, seines, eines

    mein, dein, sein, etc are possessive articles/adjectives. You inflect the endings according to the role the noun is playing in the sentence. It isn't automatically a genitive every time you say "my", "his", etc.

    I think the genitive ending is probably the least used ending for possessive adjectives, because people say things like "he took my book" and "my dad can beat up your dad" much more often than they say things like "these are the results of my clinical investigation"!
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Something about not being able to speak French, but wanting to learn and become a polyglot! I used the subjunctive of course I was switching between the languages it was greAt! I understood her to...

    But yeah, the Spanish teacher was outside on my way to physics, and I said something and she asked if I was doing Spanish I replied no in Spanish (didn't think to start speaking to her)
    You used the sacred le subjunctif if that's not the best way to impress her...:dontknow:
    Well...2 months to master the Spanish subjunctive?
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    You used the sacred le subjunctif if that's not the best way to impress her...:dontknow:
    Well...2 months to master the Spanish subjunctive?
    Haha, I don't know if I'll bother doing the actual AS. We'll see...
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    You're very very very welcome!!

    I'm really hopeless at explaining stuff But if you give me an example sentence I can be of more help to you
    You seem thirsty for linguistic knowledge, I likee (a)
    Nooo you're great at explaining things! :O hmm... Lets see...
    Does this make sense? : Ik ga naar school om te leren.
    Apparently 'om te' is 'in order to'. Is this true?

    Ik hou van je. Ik hou van jij. Ik hou van jou. Hee hee which sentences has a stressed 'you'? If that makes sense :/

    Es tut mir leid wenn ich lästig bin


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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Haha, I don't know if I'll bother doing the actual AS. We'll see...
    Jaja kleinen Fish, wir werden sehen ^.^
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Jaja kleinen Fish, wir werden sehen ^.^
    I'd rather have:

    A* French.

    Than Aaa in French, Spanish and German. So hmmm...
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    (Original post by YummyDietician)
    Nooo you're great at explaining things! :O hmm... Lets see...
    Does this make sense? : Ik ga naar school om te leren.
    Apparently 'om te' is 'in order to'. Is this true?

    Ik hou van je. Ik hou van jij. Ik hou van jou. Hee hee which sentences has a stressed 'you'? If that makes sense :/

    Es tut mir leid wenn ich lästig bin


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    Ik ook van jou! (a)

    the tiny word "om" actually means "in order to"...just like in German with "um" btw

    "Je" can be interchangeable with "jij" or "jou" depending on circumstances! lol
    You can't say: "Ik hou van jij"...BUT you can say: "Jij bent degene waar ik van hou"
    which means "You are the one who I love" ^^
    The sentences in bold are perfect though! Goed gemaakt!
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    You used the sacred le subjunctif if that's not the best way to impress her...:dontknow:
    Well...2 months to master the Spanish subjunctive?
    Bon courage with that one What have you been studying today, fish?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I'd rather have:

    A* French.

    Than Aaa in French, Spanish and German. So hmmm...
    I'm relieved pour vous!!
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    Bon courage with that one What have you been studying today, fish?
    Nothing, I've been in college:

    Maths: Eularian and Hamiltonian Networks.

    Chemistry: Basic electrons and that.
    French: how to form... Wait for it... The present tense
    Physics: did some activities on density

    I have a headache... First day fasting too... Starting tomorrow
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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    The genitive case of mein, dein, sein goes like ein

    Masculine Gen
    meines, deines, seines, eines

    Feminine Gen
    meiner, deiner, seiner, einer

    Neuter Gen
    meines, deines, seines, eines

    mein, dein, sein, etc are possessive articles/adjectives. You inflect the endings according to the role the noun is playing in the sentence. It isn't automatically a genitive every time you say "my", "his", etc.

    I think the genitive ending is probably the least used ending for possessive adjectives, because people say things like "he took my book" and "my dad can beat up your dad" much more often than they say things like "these are the results of my clinical investigation"!
    So I would say.....Das auto seines bruders, instead of using the Genitive Personal Pronoun seiner (das auto seiner bruders)?
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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    The genitive case of mein, dein, sein goes like ein

    Masculine Gen
    meines, deines, seines, eines

    Feminine Gen
    meiner, deiner, seiner, einer

    Neuter Gen
    meines, deines, seines, eines

    mein, dein, sein, etc are possessive articles/adjectives. You inflect the endings according to the role the noun is playing in the sentence. It isn't automatically a genitive every time you say "my", "his", etc.

    I think the genitive ending is probably the least used ending for possessive adjectives, because people say things like "he took my book" and "my dad can beat up your dad" much more often than they say things like "these are the results of my clinical investigation"!
    Will you take any offence to Fish' hypothical prediction of a potential grade 'A' in AS-level German? ;D
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Will you take any offence at Fish' hypothical prediction of grade a in AS-level German? ;D
    I'm saying I'd rather not risk French for German graded were just there :mmm:
 
 
 
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