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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    Cinque opzioni? Ma pensavo che solo si facesse opzioni nel anno 'AS', e tre A2s? O si deve fare 'General Studies' alla tua scuola?
    Generalmente, a mia scuola, cinque opzioni è l'importo massimo che fai per AS (di solito, i genti fanno quattro)... e a volte, fermi un opzioni e fai tre o quattro per A2. Penso che sei materie per A-Level sarebbe troppo difficile!!
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    (Original post by constantmeowage)
    What did you mean by 'tan' here? Did you mean 'so', as in 'therefore'? I've corrected it as if you meant 'therefore' here.

    Ah okay So apart from Dutch and Spanish, what's your other language? You said that would make four, right?
    (Original post by Ronove)
    My suggestions where I'm not sure constantmeowage quite nailed it:

    el año que viene (NB: no 'en')

    no tengo motivo para continuar/seguir hablando
    How would I say "That seems like such a long time ago"? The context is that I'm talking about a past holiday.
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    How would I say "That seems like such a long time ago"? The context is that I'm talking about a past holiday.
    That's got me stumped I'm afraid. Last time I actively studied Spanish was in 2010 by the way!
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    That's got me stumped I'm afraid. Last time I actively studied Spanish was in 2010 by the way!
    No worries, can you recommend any phrases for a GCSE writing controlled assessment for an A* grade?
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    No worries, can you recommend any phrases for a GCSE writing controlled assessment for an A* grade?
    You'll find that kind of stuff in Palabra por palabra (for example). Just try to be sure that you're using them the right way and in the right context. As soon as you get to uni people get absolutely ripped to shreds for using most of those phrases because they sound so unnatural, though.
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    How would I say "That seems like such a long time ago"? The context is that I'm talking about a past holiday.
    Parece que eso fue hace mucho tiempo? It seems like it was a long time ago? Not a word for word translation, pero espero que te sirva.
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    (Original post by AquisM)
    Parece que eso fue hace mucho tiempo? It seems like it was a long time ago? Not a word for word translation, pero espero que te sirva.
    I would use pasar or ocurrir or suceder as opposed to ser, to ensure the sense of 'happen' doesn't get lost, but otherwise that looks far better than anything I could think of when I tried!
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    You'll find that kind of stuff in Palabra por palabra (for example). Just try to be sure that you're using them the right way and in the right context. As soon as you get to uni people get absolutely ripped to shreds for using most of those phrases because they sound so unnatural, though.
    *feels immensely sad*

    I was looking forward to having the chance to actually use 3/4 of the Woert fuer Woert vocabulary!
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    (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
    *feels immensely sad*

    I was looking forward to having the chance to actually use 3/4 of the Woert fuer Woert vocabulary!
    This is odd. It's Wort für Wort (not Wört) but I also struggle to remember which it is, every single time I try to remember the name of the book. It doesn't matter how fluent in German I get. Though evidently I'm sure enough about it now to have noticed that.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    This is odd. It's Wort für Wort (not Wört) but I also struggle to remember which it is, every single time I try to remember the name of the book. It doesn't matter how fluent in German I get. Though evidently I'm sure enough about it now to have noticed that.
    This reminds me of my tutor commenting “did you think it looked pretty?” after my work featured an öhne!
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    Bonjour! J'ai fini tout mes travails! je suis heureux...!

    Actuellement, j'ai besoin de finir mon examen de la dessin demain... Puis, je peux commencer le révision...
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    Natives shouldn't be allowed to do it, obviously if I went to Holland I would ace the English qualification but it's not really worth anything to a native really. I think some Universities won't accept a native(foreign) language as an A-Level.
    Lol I wouldn't be so sure about that...
    I think you're really underestimating the difficulty of HS English exams in the Netherlands. If you think that it would basically be like doing your GCSE Spanish exam in English, then you are soooo mistaken!

    If you, like 25% of Dutch students studied at a 'VWO' (which has a curriculum that's VERY intensive and a lot more rigorous than that of the English 'grammar') You would have to be exceptionally good to break the 8/10 boundary in national examinations. The exams are challenging and there are most certaintly no 'dumbing down' or 'grade inflation' issues...


    But who is native and who isn't though?
    What makes someone classify as a 'native'? And who gets to decide that??
    And if you are born in a certain country, does that mean that it should automatically be asumed that you speak/read/write the national language(s) of that certain country?
    I really do understand what you're saying though...It is anoying that some people are going to have an "advantage" over you in MFL exams, whether it be because they are constantly exposed to the language in question at home, or because their families are able to take regular holidays to a country where target language is spoken and can be practissed. Perhaps someone could have a "natural aptitude" for languages...

    It's not fair :yep:

    I'm afraid that some people will always have an advantage over others, but I guess that's just something you have to be mentally prepared for when taking academic subjects at A-level C'est la vie?





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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Lol I wouldn't be so sure about that...
    I think you're really underestimating the difficulty of HS English exams in the Netherlands. If you think that it would basically be like doing your GCSE Spanish exam in English, then you are soooo mistaken!

    If you, like 25% of Dutch students studied at a 'VWO' (which has a curriculum that's VERY intensive and a lot more rigorous than that of the English 'grammar') You would have to be exceptionally good to break the 8/10 boundary in national examinations. The exams are challenging and there are most certaintly no 'dumbing down' or 'grade inflation' issues...


    But who is native and who isn't though?
    What makes someone classify as a 'native'? And who gets to decide that??
    And if you are born in a certain country, does that mean that it should automatically be asumed that you speak/read/write the national language(s) of that certain country?
    I really do understand what you're saying though...It is anoying that some people are going to have an "advantage" over you in MFL exams, whether it be because they are constantly exposed to the language in question at home, or because their families are able to take regular holidays to a country where target language is spoken and can be practissed. Perhaps someone could have a "natural aptitude" for languages...

    It's not fair :yep:

    I'm afraid that some people will always have an advantage over others, but I guess that's just something you have to be mentally prepared for when taking academic subjects at A-level C'est la vie?





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    I think you're being naive about who takes UK foreign language A-levels. When I did my Spanish speaking exams, there was a Colombian girl visiting on an exchange for a few months who was just taking the exams to get the qualification. She didn't even know what the exam was about, I had to explain (in Spanish) what the deal was with the topic cards and the preparation section before you go in to the examiner. When I was applying for uni the first time round, there was a guy on here who had at least one German parent and who was fluent in German (and I think he moved to the UK partway through secondary education) who was applying to Cambridge and deliberately withheld information that he was a native speaker, and hoped the interviewers wouldn't pick up on it so he could use it for his offer. He got in.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    I think you're being naive about who takes UK foreign language A-levels. When I did my Spanish speaking exams, there was a Colombian girl visiting on an exchange for a few months who was just taking the exams to get the qualification. She didn't even know what the exam was about, I had to explain (in Spanish) what the deal was with the topic cards and the preparation section before you go in to the examiner. When I was applying for uni the first time round, there was a guy on here who had at least one German parent and who was fluent in German (and I think he moved to the UK partway through secondary education) who was applying to Cambridge and deliberately withheld information that he was a native speaker, and hoped the interviewers wouldn't pick up on it so he could use it for his offer. He got in.
    At what point did my post suggest naivety though? :O
    I merely suggested that a wide range of people do these A-levels and that not all native speakes should be uhmm...swept away with the same brush? xD

    I fully recognize that some people who do have an "unfair advantage" are going to abuse it, at the expense of others...
    But isn't that also the case in other academic A-levels?
    If you are interested in maths and have parents who are maths professors, wouldn't you be accustomed to the ins and outs of trigenometry and whatnot at an early age?
    I know It's not the same thing, but it would just be impossible to regulate how much of an advantage each and every individual has in their A-levels, and where the upper-threshhold should be set before it becomes unfair to others. So not a lot can be done. Most slightly selfish (university aspiring) 17 year olds would sees at the chance to claim a free (desirable) qualification..wiithout questionen whether their actions are 'morally right' lol

    If anything, your anecdotal sample concists of 2 other people, while I have an endless thread and my own first hand experience as a "expected Dutch soeaker" to go by...



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    Does it matter that they're using it to their own advantage?

    The German who didn't declare it as a fluent language anyway... He speaks English and German? That's enough in my books. If I was fluent in another language, I'd want the a level to count, it isn't fair that it doesn't count just because you're a native in it...

    Although welsh for example, has to separate qualifications for first and second language, maybe that's an idea?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Does it matter that they're using it to their own advantage?

    The German who didn't declare it as a fluent language anyway... He speaks English and German? That's enough in my books. If I was fluent in another language, I'd want the a level to count, it isn't fair that it doesn't count just because you're a native in it...

    Although welsh for example, has to separate qualifications for first and second language, maybe that's an idea?
    True say, Fish!

    Hmmm but that second language qualification would always require a lot less effort ;p


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    For any languages present here...

    How do you place emphasis on a word, like in English we say *that*.

    Eg It wasn't that hard
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    Dutch example

    1) none: Het was niet moeilijk!
    2) medium: Het was niet ZO moeilijk!
    3) a lot: ZO moeilijk was het niet!

    literal translation:

    1) It was not difficult!
    2) It was not so difficult!
    3) So difficult was it not!

    (the change in the sentence structure is vital)


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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Dutch example

    1) none: Het was niet moeilijk!
    2) medium: Het was niet ZO moeilijk!
    3) a lot: ZO moeilijk was het niet!

    literal translation:

    1) It was not difficult!
    2) It was not so difficult!
    3) So difficult was it not!

    (the change in the sentence structure is vital)


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    Dutch seems even harder than German tbf
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    Is it naive of me to think I can get my Spanish and Italian (maybe German) to my French level by GCSE Results day?

    Honest opinions!
 
 
 
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