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    (Original post by Ronove)
    Most times I see Dutch it amazes me how it seems closer to Danish than to German in so many ways.
    Same! I don't speak any Dutch but I can usually figure out some of what it says. Have considered learning it in the past but I don't think now would be the best time :/

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    (Original post by Ronove)
    Most times I see Dutch it amazes me how it seems closer to Danish than to German in so many ways.
    Really?:eek: that's a surprise!
    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Dutch is hard! Damn, I'm not used to being a beginner again!
    :mmm: what's hard about it?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Really?:eek: that's a surprise!


    :mmm: what's hard about it?
    Just getting used to how to say everything! I'm not used to being a beginner again
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Just getting used to how to say everything! I'm not used to being a beginner again
    The pronunciation? It's very glottal isn't it?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    The pronunciation? It's very glottal isn't it?
    Seems quite, but it's not as harsh as German
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    Most times I see Dutch it amazes me how it seems closer to Danish than to German in so many ways.
    Haha remember 'hoofdpijn' :lol:
    What do you think about West Frisian then? xP

    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Dutch is hard! Damn, I'm not used to being a beginner again!
    O nee! Wat is er aan de hand?

    (Original post by boumavilla)
    You wanna learn Dutch??!?! :teeth:

    Come join the family.



    Hoi! :gah:

    Nu heb ik drie Nederlandse boeken!!! :woo: Mijn vriend heeft voor mij Harry Potter en de Vuurbeker gekocht. :yep:
    Jouw gezicht weer! (Your face again!) :rolleyes: :lol:

    Dat is aardig van je vriend! Kan je het wel lezen?

    As always, I've made some slight alterations to your quote
    You might be interested to know that 'to have bought' is a regular past participle in German (kaufen - gekauft), but not in Dutch (kopen - gekocht) 'gekocht' incidentally means 'to have cooked' in German (kochen-gekocht)

    I expect only Ronove could follow this random cross-linguistic train of thought at this stage :mmm:
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Seems quite, but it's not as harsh as German
    Echt waar? / Echt wahr? / Really?
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Haha remember 'hoofdpijn' :lol:
    What do you think about West Frisian then? xP



    O nee! Wat is er aan de hand?



    Jou gezicht weer! (Your face again!) :rolleyes: :lol:

    Dat is aardig van je vriend! Kan je het wel lezen?

    As always, I've made some slight alterations to your quote
    You might be interested to know that 'to have bought' is a regular past participle in German (kaufen - gekauft), but not in Dutch (kopen - gekocht) 'gekocht' incidentally means 'to have cooked' in German (kochen-gekocht)

    I expect only Ronove could follow this random cross-linguistic train of thought at this stage :mmm:
    I don't think I've ever actually bothered looking at any examples of West Frisian, how naughty of me. :teehee:

    I would have skipped over the more detailed Dutch talk had I not seen the 'gekocht' sentence and done a double-take.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    I don't think I've ever actually bothered looking at any examples of West Frisian, how naughty of me. :teehee:

    I would have skipped over the more detailed Dutch talk had I not seen the 'gekocht' sentence and done a double-take.
    Ich habe gekocht (egg) (don't know gender, but it'd be accusative right?)
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    I don't think I've ever actually bothered looking at any examples of West Frisian, how naughty of me. :teehee:

    I would have skipped over the more detailed Dutch talk had I not seen the 'gekocht' sentence and done a double-take.
    :teehee: You are forgiven, Roney!
    West Frisian is definitely the 'Romanian' of the the Germanic language family
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Ich habe gekocht (egg) (don't know gender, but it'd be accusative right?)
    As in I boiled an egg? That would indeed be accusative. It's ein Ei (neuter). Ich habe ein Ei gekocht. Nun esse ich das gekochte Ei.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    As in I boiled an egg? That would indeed be accusative. It's ein Ei (neuter). Ich habe ein Ei gekocht. Nun esse ich das gekochte Ei.
    I fried it

    Now eat I the cooked egg = crazy word order I'd have said

    I now eat, the cooked egg
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I fried it

    Now eat I the cooked egg = crazy word order I'd have said

    I now eat, the cooked egg
    I don't think you can say gekocht in that case, it literally means boiled. A fried egg is ein Spiegelei, and to fry something is etwas braten or etwas in der Pfanne braten.

    Ich habe ein Spiegelei gebraten.

    And the word order honestly becomes sheer instinct as time goes on.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I fried it

    Now eat I the cooked egg = crazy word order I'd have said

    I now eat, the cooked egg
    Hmmm I might be able to top that word order, but not sure if it would still be 'authentic German', but I'll post it anyway

    "Ich bin dabei, das gekochte Ei zu essen"

    And I will most certaintly not provide a literal translation for this one :cool:
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Haha remember 'hoofdpijn' :lol:
    What do you think about West Frisian then? xP



    O nee! Wat is er aan de hand?



    Jouw gezicht weer! (Your face again!) :rolleyes: :lol:

    Dat is aardig van je vriend! Kan je het wel lezen?

    As always, I've made some slight alterations to your quote
    You might be interested to know that 'to have bought' is a regular past participle in German (kaufen - gekauft), but not in Dutch (kopen - gekocht) 'gekocht' incidentally means 'to have cooked' in German (kochen-gekocht)

    I expect only Ronove could follow this random cross-linguistic train of thought at this stage :mmm:

    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Echt waar? / Echt wahr? / Really?
    It's just quite hard to keep up really. Step by step I guess, just like I have done with the other languages I've learnt.

    I guess I think it sounds nice from just hearing it as pillow talk I guess :love:
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    I don't think you can say gekocht in that case, it literally means boiled. A fried egg is ein Spiegelei, and to fry something is etwas braten or etwas in der Pfanne braten.

    Ich habe ein Spiegelei gebraten.

    And the word order honestly becomes sheer instinct as time goes on.
    Oh :lol: maybe not then

    Hopefully, although I'm focussing on Spanish and Italian I think! German for the summer...

    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Hmmm I might be able to top that word order, but not sure if it would still be 'authentic German', but I'll post it anyway

    "Ich bin dabei, das gekochte Ei zu essen"

    And I will most certaintly not provide a literal translation for this one :cool:
    I am ..., it's cooked egg you eat?
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    It's just quite hard to keep up really. Step by step I guess, just like I have done with the other languages I've learnt.

    I guess I think it sounds nice from just hearing it as pillow talk I guess :love:
    Dat snap ik! :yep:
    Neem het rustig aan. één voor één
    ("één voor één" is the expression for "one by one" or "one step at a time")

    De taal der liefde!
    (That's an old idiom from back when Dutch still used cases) "Die Sprache der Liebe" sound familiar?
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    (Original post by l'evil fish)
    oh :lol: Maybe not then

    hopefully, although i'm focussing on spanish and italian i think! German for the summer...



    I am ..., it's cooked egg you eat?
    hahaahahahahahhh
    funny!
    =)
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Dat snap ik! :yep:
    Neem het rustig aan. één voor één
    ("één voor één" is the expression for "one by one" or "one step at a time")

    De taal der liefde!
    (That's an old idiom from back when Dutch still used cases) "Die Sprache der Liebe" sound familiar?
    Yeah, I understand die Sprache der Liebe. Not something usually associated with Dutch. Usually it's French but I honestly don't get that association
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Yeah, I understand die Sprache der Liebe. Not something usually associated with Dutch. Usually it's French but I honestly don't get that association
    But I thought all languages get that status during "pillow talk" ;D

    :yep: De meeste mensen vinden Frans 'romantisch' en Nederlands 'lelijk' !

    I need to work on my sarcasm skills :bigsmile:
 
 
 
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