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The UK and the US; which has the worst politician(s)/political environment? Watch

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    I think the title says it all; which has the worst politician(s)/political environment (e.g. Cameron vs Obama)

    I know it's a broad topic (probably incomparable), but any views are welcome
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    Obama is far worse in my opinion
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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    Obama is far worse in my opinion
    In what way?

    Hurm... if Obama were to be the PM of the UK, how do you think he'll perform?
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    (Original post by kka25)
    In what way?

    Hurm... if Obama were to be the PM of the UK, how do you think he'll perform?
    Awfully, hes not made any advances on gun control, hes always compromising to keep republicans pleased, his drone strikes are well known to kill american citizens abroad and his work on the economy has just being a shambles, although I hate David Cameron's social policies, at least he doesn't **** up the economy all the time.
    Obama would do worse, I'm still unsure who to vote on in 2015 as Ed seems like quite a weak leader personally.
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    Both. Equally.

    The majority of the answers in this thread will be "US". Because, yano, this is kinda a British forum.
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    The US - it's more rife with money and the rich have even less of a conscience than our own rich. And the presidential system is purpose-built to frustrate democracy.
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    The US has the worse political environment by far. The Republicans are growing more extreme by the minute; the system is predisposed to producing stalemates between the parties; both parties are concerned far more with sabotaging the other than with doing what the country needs; Obama's economic policies are heavily misguided; their elections mean that you have to be super-rich to have any chance of winning the democrat or republican ticket.
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    I think Britain has the worst, because I've been so dissappointed with each of the major parties that I just don't care about any of them anymore. Your candidates are presented to by the parties and the whole thing is alot less open.

    In America, yes it is more likely to get nutbacks into office, but you vote for the individual not the party.

    I feel sorry for Obama, there was no way he could live up to the expectations people had with him taking office and he has a republic majority in congress who made it their sole purpose to block all of his policies and stonewalling him at virtually every opportunity. All this was done so that when the 2012 and 2016 elections happen, they could say he hasn't manage to restore the economy, in spite of that, the economy has gotten better whilst he's been president.
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    Tough call.

    The UK system is between labour/conservatives, which are two sides of the same coin. So we don't really have much choice.

    Whereas the US system has dramatic choices; however, its design leads to many stalemates.
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    The US system is shambles. You have a locked legislative, with fillibusting being the standard norm.
    Our system may be corrupt in many ways, but at least we don't have Super PACs and overly powerful lobby groups.
    The US will always remain a locked two-party system as they can spend absurd amounts of money on party propaganda.
    We have somewhat fair financial constraits for our Political parties.
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    Without the slightest shadow of a doubt, the US. You do not last in the US political system unless you are, what we would consider, right-wing. Their social outlook is incredibly individualistic and their economics are scathingly right. And let's not get started on their frankly abhorrent foreign policy, or the Federal Reserve...
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    I'd say the USA is worse. The policies are too rigid and predictable as it's always the same two parties, and it's rare that they're ever internally challenged. Though the UK's system isn't much better there is a lot more scope for (comparatively) smaller parties to have a big impact (e.g. the Lib Dems at the last election and looking like UKIP at the next). In the USA you vote Republican, you vote Democrat, or you waste your vote. On top of that, political education is very poor, hence the number of states that always vote for one party regardless of what their particular policies are. Yes, this does happen in the UK, but I still think people should vote Republican because they agree with their stance, rather than voting Republican because mummy and daddy and the neighbours and the whole town vote Republican.
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    The US. I don't think an explanation is need really.

    Not that the UK is much better, however.
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    (Original post by Gwilym101)
    I think Britain has the worst, because I've been so dissappointed with each of the major parties that I just don't care about any of them anymore. Your candidates are presented to by the parties and the whole thing is alot less open.

    In America, yes it is more likely to get nutbacks into office, but you vote for the individual not the party.

    I feel sorry for Obama, there was no way he could live up to the expectations people had with him taking office and he has a republic majority in congress who made it their sole purpose to block all of his policies and stonewalling him at virtually every opportunity. All this was done so that when the 2012 and 2016 elections happen, they could say he hasn't manage to restore the economy, in spite of that, the economy has gotten better whilst he's been president.
    He had a Democratic majority in both houses for his first two years; he had plenty of opportunity to get things done. And the US senate, which is controlled by the Democrats, hasn't passed a budget in years so blaming this all on the Republicans is disingenuous. Also, how would the Republicans be representing the people who voted for them by voting for Democrat policies?
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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    Awfully, hes not made any advances on gun control, hes always compromising to keep republicans pleased, his drone strikes are well known to kill american citizens abroad and his work on the economy has just being a shambles, although I hate David Cameron's social policies, at least he doesn't **** up the economy all the time.
    Obama would do worse, I'm still unsure who to vote on in 2015 as Ed seems like quite a weak leader personally.
    Obama clearly has it worse, I mean he's working with an oppostion intent on making sure he doesn't succeed even if by doing so the country is worse off. Look at how they voted against a bill to help victims of hurricane Sandy. The American politicans has the most unscrupulous human being cohort you'll ever find. That's no to add the amount of disrespect he is constantly subjected to because, lets face it, he is black.
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    (Original post by Nick100)
    He had a Democratic majority in both houses for his first two years; he had plenty of opportunity to get things done. And the US senate, which is controlled by the Democrats, hasn't passed a budget in years so blaming this all on the Republicans is disingenuous. Also, how would the Republicans be representing the people who voted for them by voting for Democrat policies?
    How is it disingenuous when the house (controlled by the repulicans) keep just rejecting every bill they pass?
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    (Original post by 419)
    Obama clearly has it worse, I mean he's working with an oppostion intent on making sure he doesn't succeed even if by doing so the country is worse off. Look at how they voted against a bill to help victims of hurricane Sandy. The American politicans has the most unscrupulous human being cohort you'll ever find.
    This is interesting; didn't know this.

    That's no to much the amount of disrespect he is constantly subjected to because, lets face it, he is black.
    :eek:
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    The US has far worse political environment, their system and political culture is appalling. The elections end up as popularity contests between personalities forcing the politics to take a backseat. The incredible spending used to support party propaganda allows the rich to have an undemocratically large say in politics. Religion and regional pressure has a considerable influence over peoples voting to the point where people vote for a party regardless of ts policies and are unlikely to ever change.
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    Neither are great but I would agree with most people. The US's political system is a mess at present.
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    (Original post by Nick100)
    He had a Democratic majority in both houses for his first two years; he had plenty of opportunity to get things done. And the US senate, which is controlled by the Democrats, hasn't passed a budget in years so blaming this all on the Republicans is disingenuous. Also, how would the Republicans be representing the people who voted for them by voting for Democrat policies?
    True with regards to the houses. Although congress is in charge of the budget not the senate, and is currently controlled by the republicans. Whom in turn can vetoed by the president, in this situation you have to accept that compromise may have to happen.

    Once you've been elected you have a duty to work with other people who have been elected. Republicans and democrats should vote for the best option regardless of who came up with it. When your economy is down the crapper everyone has to muck in and sort it out, as opposed to stonewalling policies so the problem never gets sorted. If you don't like the policy take what you agree with and suggest changes to what you don't agree with, but recognise that compromise is acceptable if neither side could realistically do whatever they wanted. I remember a few years ago the a lot of people thought that Obama should enact I think the (14th?) amendment to get one of his economic policies through as the republicans were pretty much refusing to work with him.

    The republicans have also been fairly disingenuous especially during election time, when Romney was saying the economy had gotten worse under Obama when it actually gotten better. He only shut up when a reporter called him out on it.

    To be fair I don't think either UK or US' political climate is particularly good but for different reasons. There is more openness in the US version and more clear distinctions between party stance and individual stance on issues. This is a huge positive in my opinion.

    On the flipside, it means issues can be brought up that shouldn't even be debated about such should evolution and creationism be taught side by side.

    The UK doesn't have issues regarding things such as the teaching of evolution and our conservatives are not as glaringly influenced by religious lobbies. Our right is pretty much the american left. This is a positive.

    But candidates for election are selected by the party rather than by the public, and as candidates can be penalised for voting against party policy there is less distinction between what the individual stands for and what the party stands for. Also for a large number of people none of the big three seem particularly appealing (the tories have enacted a number of unpopular policies such as the student fees, the lib dems said they would oppose them on this but didn't and labour still has bitterness directed towards for the economy and the wars in the middle east) or if one does it has appeal by nature of not being one of the other parties (one of the reasons I think labour has a serious shot at the next election).
    In the US these policies are attributed to one person rather than the entire party, so the republicans aren't really blamed for the war in iraq George W. Bush is.
 
 
 
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