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International students and their obsession with UK Universities Watch

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    I understand why international students would obsess with universities such as Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester, King's, etc (even local students do :rolleyes:) but not lower tier universities such as MMU and others that I wont list.

    I don't know the % of these international students, but most of them came from parts of China and other neighbouring places countries(I may be wrong).

    Why pay such extravagant international fees (you can buy a house with those fees! :eek:) if they are planning to study in a pretty much unknown university worldwide? :confused:
    I'm sure their own local universities quality suppress these universities.

    Opinions?

    EDIT: Some people need to read between the lines
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    (Original post by kka25)

    I'm sure their own local universities quality suppress these universities.

    Opinions?
    Blunt exaggeration. Whose is "their"?
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    Did you not read the OP?

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    (Original post by Alpha510)
    Blunt exaggeration. Whose is "their"?
    Did you not read the OP?

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    Why do British students choose to study abroad for a year or so? Because prestige doesn't mean everything. Some international students may just want to come for, say, the culture or the experience of studying in the UK.
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    (Original post by the mezzil)
    Did you not read the OP?

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    I did. He said "international students" are obsessed and only talked of China.
    That, is a blunt exaggeration.
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    It tends to be for the prestige. A British degree is highly thought of.
    And it is cheaper and one year shorter than an American/Canadian degree.

    UK has high educational standards.

    In the US it is often Liberal Art Studies with many requirements from different departments. Meaning that when you graduate you end up only spending around half % of your classes in the desired majoring field. Also everyone knows the party/drinking culture that is extravagant in the US and the whole girls go crazy thing that is just over the top.

    I also noticed that British students tend to be more mature and independent than American ones. And in terms of education they are more knowledgeable.
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    (Original post by farfalla)
    It tends to be for the prestige. A British degree is highly thought of.
    And it is cheaper and one year shorter than an American/Canadian degree.

    UK has high educational standards.
    If this is for the top Unis, I'd could accept but not for the lower ones.

    I also noticed that British students tend to be more mature and independent than American ones. And in terms of education they are more knowledgeable.
    How many Americans have you met?
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    And UK universities are cheaper! International student fees and living expenses are still cheaper than a degree at a private college in the US for students with parents whose incomes are too high for get financial aid.

    And sometimes they like our more quirky and specialist courses. I have a Texas friend who has just done a 3-year art conservation studies degree at City and Guilds in London (a good art school but not an impressive 'name'). After she graduated she got a job immediately in the conservation dept of a Texas museum. In the US she would have spent 4 years doing her bachelors degree and another 2 years doing a masters to give her the equivalent knowledge base. And she would have ended up with the same qualifications as everyone else in the US trying to get conservation jobs in museums.

    Sometimes they are attracted by the cost, the course and/or having something 'different' on their CV to help them stand out, and the cultural experience. And after three years in the UK an EOSL speaker will be fluent in English which is a huge asset to a CV.

    I have friend's at my school who are doing it the other way round. Some are looking at the States and some are looking at Europe. One boy I know wants to do Marine Biology and he has applied to a uni in Australia. The only positive about having to to pay such high fees in the UK - paying fees in other countries is not the big deal it used to be. The world has become our oyster these days!
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    I know a chinese who failed getting into uni in china and then she took A level and eventually got into Imperial……
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    (Original post by a5a09)
    I know a chinese who failed getting into uni in china and then she took A level and eventually got into Imperial……
    I've heard about some universities there are difficult to get in as well.
    The thing is, if they got into their local universities, they'd be paying local fees, which are far cheaper than the UK universities' international fees I'd believe.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    I understand why international students would obsess with universities such as Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester, King's, etc (even local students do :rolleyes:) but not lower tier universities such as MMU and others that I wont list.
    A number of reasons.

    Firstly I don't think the number of international students at some of these universities is quite as high as you seem to be suggesting.

    Also, UK Education does still have a reasonable reputation across the world and quite highly valued. Some of these students aren't able to get into the "high tier" universities.

    The UK is obviously an English speaking country. Where better to learn or improve your English than in the UK, where the language developed, the country of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Keats and Wordsworth?

    UK degrees allow students to specialise earlier and are shorter than US degrees, not to mention that tuition fees are still lower.

    Finally, some of these universities still offer vocational and professional courses that are accredited both in the UK and, sometimes, worldwide.


    I don't know the % of these international students, but most of them came from parts of China and other neighbouring places countries(I may be wrong).
    So with respect, before you actually create a thread in the Debate and Discussion forum (Educational Debate to be specific), why not first research the number of international students at such universities, find out where they come from, and provide the statistics in your first post. That way your post will appear more well informed and intended to cause constructive discussion and debate?

    What you seem to be saying is that "why are international students paying such large sums of money to attend poor quality universities...but I don't know where these international students come from or if there are even many at these universities". That isn't a particularly good way to begin a thread.

    Why pay such extravagant international fees (you can buy a house with those fees! :eek:)
    A flat. Or a two bed terrace in need of renovation and only in some parts of the country, perhaps. Not that I'm saying the fees aren't expensive.

    Plus in my experience (which is only at Russell Group universities) many of the Chinese students in particular are from very middle class backgrounds. It's not like money is much of an issue. That's a broad generalisation, I know, but one I stand by.
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    Firstly, competition for university place in China is intense, and there are lots of able and well-qualified young people who cannot get into university there but certainly have the ability required to study in the UK;

    Secondly, the UK does have a reasonably efficient system of quality control. It is far from perfect, but I know of several instances where poor quality courses and low academic standards were noticed and corrected (or in some cases closed) because of the system of external examiners and course moderation, whereby academics from some universities monitor teaching and examining in others.
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    (Original post by Voyager_2002)
    Firstly, competition for university place in China is intense, and there are lots of able and well-qualified young people who cannot get into university there but certainly have the ability required to study in the UK.
    Yes, the Chinese school and university application system is very intense and competitive and I don't think it's uncommon to have to re-apply. Why not come abroad, especially to an English speaking country, where entrance is often easier to obtain?
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    why UK:

    less time compare with US and EU
    interaction with a lot of white people
    they speak english not some european languages
    NHS for students
    pounds depreciating quite a lot
    to get that posh brit accent (even their sneeze has accent in it)
    the people are more polite compare to US
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    (Original post by kka25)
    I've heard about some universities there are difficult to get in as well.
    The thing is, if they got into their local universities, they'd be paying local fees, which are far cheaper than the UK universities' international fees I'd believe.
    What I mean is she failed to get into every universities in china……
    A level is a piece of cake when it compares to exams in east asia……
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Whose common sense? Yours?
    Well, anyone who is even remotely informed about higher education will know former polytechnics offer a large number of vocational and professional courses.

    Just a quick search of a course list will show this to be the case.

    You are, I think, reasonably informed so I am fairly confident you are also aware of this.

    Research? Where are the sources?
    The 2008 RAE, for example. You only need to look at it.

    Take Education, for example. Manchester Met has one of the UK's leading centres for Applied Education/Educational research. How do you know that a large number of Manchester Met's international students aren't PhD Education students and are therefore attracted to the university due to its international reputation in their chosen research area?

    Instead you just seem to focus on Manchester Met's lack of a prestigious name, and its low league table position, and seem staggered that international students should chose to study there. This is little more than academic snobbery.

    We're talking about you who wants the source but you yourself can't provide the sources (this is the irony).
    Because I am providing largely opinions and observations which is exactly what you want. You are the person who created the thread and effectively assumed that, despite not knowing the statistics, international students still flock to such universities. My basic point is that, if you're going to create a thread asking why international students go to certain universities, why not check the statistics beforehand and see whether or not large numbers really do go to MMU and other "low tier" universities? And, if they do, find out the departments in which they are based.

    I'm not meaning to be argumentative. I'm meaning to be helpful more than anything. If you actually go to the university website and check where their students come from (which departments have the most international students) then perhaps you will see a correlation? Most of the international students are in their strongest departments? Maybe you won't. Either way, to research this and mention it in this thread will only benefit the thread.

    :confused:
    Yes, it's my views. If you think it's odd, then it's not really my problem isn't it? Much like you who mentioned all about sources but not providing any, and since this is your second post, I just find it really odd myself.
    I don't find your views or opinions odd and, even if I do, they are your opinions and you are entitled to have them. What I found odd was your assumption that international students do flock to places like MMU without knowing the stats.

    Your assumption is pretty much applied to your own self. If you read your own post, and the fact the you brought the UK institutions into some positives views (that everyone should accept and without references even) shows your, I think, close minded mind.
    I have no idea what you're trying to say there and, quite frankly, I have no interest in what you're saying here. I want this to be kept broadly on topic and not to engage in any discussion about who or who has not got a "close minded mind" (whatever they are).

    Ok, then. Find someone online that can have the same views with me then. Or better yet, go to a credited online library and find views on this matter.
    kka, I shall say this once more and that is it, I was not referring to your views. I was merely mentioning that, if you don't know the statistics, perhaps it would be a good idea to find them. I've said this about five times now. I'll say it no more.

    Look, you're spamming this thread. What you mentioned here is unrelated to the title. If you don't like some of the opinions, then it's really not anyone's problems.
    I will comment no more for it is not good for the thread, and probably bores the hell out of others. However, I'm not saying I disagree with opinions given in this thread. All I disagree with is what I take as great academic snobbery in your first post and I am perfectly entitled to mention it.
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    because a degree from a uni in this country is way better than a degree from their dreaded third world country........also a degree from the likes of UK, America etc. will give the more opportunities in life and more wider pathway to success
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    (Original post by kka25)
    I understand why international students would obsess with universities such as Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester, King's, etc (even local students do :rolleyes:) but not lower tier universities such as MMU and others that I wont list.

    I don't know the % of these international students, but most of them came from parts of China and other neighbouring places countries(I may be wrong).

    Why pay such extravagant international fees (you can buy a house with those fees! :eek:) if they are planning to study in a pretty much unknown university worldwide? :confused:
    I'm sure their own local universities quality suppress these universities.

    Opinions?

    EDIT: Some people need to read between the lines
    Obviously they wouldn't have come if they had half of the opportunities they have there rather than at home. Please don't be assumptive, how do you know "their own local universities"? Would you care to elaborate please?
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    I think the simplest reason is because they wish to stand out in their own country. If 75% of the population has a 'local' degree, the remaining 25% would appear more appealing to local employers because they have brought along foreign knowledge and expertise.

    And, no matter how advanced a country is, it always wants to know how good its neighbour is doing.
 
 
 
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