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    In January I came down with the serious meningitis which caused me to be in a coma and on life support. 2 Weeks later I came into college and sat all my exams. However, I only got extra 2% marks on my exams. Maybe not even that. I could only apply for an extra 2%. They don’t guarantee or tell you that they will give you that 2%. I think it’s ridiculous. It’s a brain injury, and there are different situations which are less serious then that, and you can apply for a higher percentage. It could even ruin my chances of getting into university. Is it fair that having a serious illness should jeopardise that? GRR opinions? Is it just me who thinks this is unfair?
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    (Original post by Hollymayy)
    In January I came down with the serious meningitis which caused me to be in a coma and on life support. 2 Weeks later I came into college and sat all my exams. However, I only got extra 2% marks on my exams. Maybe not even that. I could only apply for an extra 2%. They don’t guarantee or tell you that they will give you that 2%. I think it’s ridiculous. It’s a brain injury, and there are different situations which are less serious then that, and you can apply for a higher percentage. It could even ruin my chances of getting into university. Is it fair that having a serious illness should jeopardise that? GRR opinions? Is it just me who thinks this is unfair?
    Sorry to hear what you've been through. I must have been a difficult time for you, your family and your friends.

    With something like this I think it's always difficult to adequately compensate. It will always be the case that some will be over compensated and others under-compensated. Is it possible to say that without the illness and brain injury you'd have x% more than you achieved? Some people with a certain medical condition, or who are experiencing grief, are affected in different ways and to different extents. At least there's a clearer, more standardised system in place now then there was a number of years ago.

    I have not experienced a brain injury, but during my A-levels (2001 - 2003) I did experience depression as a result of an assault, as well as increased seizures (epilepsy not diagnosed until A-levels finished) and undiagnosed dyspraxia. In fact, I had a sleep deprived EEG scan the night before my final A-level exam meaning I hadn't slept in about 36 - 48 hours before the exam. So this obviously had a tremendous impact on my academic performance in exams, rather than weekly essays or coursework.

    However, I don't think I was adequately compensated and almost missed out on my university place (originally told they didn't want me, relented when given medical evidence and after much pleading). There wasn't the system in place then that we have now. Instead medical evidence was sent to the exam boards and I think discretion used by the marker. Some schools abused the mitigating circumstances procedure so some markers were reluctant to really believe evidence given to them.

    I strongly advise you to contact universities when you apply and inform them of your mitigating circumstances. It shouldn't be mentioned in your personal statement but can be mentioned in your reference. If you've already applied, and haven't informed them, then please contact them as soon as possible and provide medical evidence. They'll hopefully take it into account should you fail to meet your offer.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Sorry to hear what you've been through. I must have been a difficult time for you, your family and your friends.

    With something like this I think it's always difficult to adequately compensate. It will always be the case that some will be over compensated and others under-compensated. Is it possible to say that without the illness and brain injury you'd have x% more than you achieved? Some people with a certain medical condition, or who are experiencing grief, are affected in different ways and to different extents. At least there's a clearer, more standardised system in place now then there was a number of years ago.

    I have not experienced a brain injury, but during my A-levels (2001 - 2003) I did experience depression as a result of an assault, as well as increased seizures (epilepsy not diagnosed until A-levels finished) and undiagnosed dyspraxia. In fact, I had a sleep deprived EEG scan the night before my final A-level exam meaning I hadn't slept in about 36 - 48 hours before the exam. So this obviously had a tremendous impact on my academic performance in exams, rather than weekly essays or coursework.

    However, I don't think I was adequately compensated and almost missed out on my university place (originally told they didn't want me, relented when given medical evidence and after much pleading). There wasn't the system in place then that we have now. Instead medical evidence was sent to the exam boards and I think discretion used by the marker. Some schools abused the mitigating circumstances procedure so some markers were reluctant to really believe evidence given to them.

    I strongly advise you to contact universities when you apply and inform them of your mitigating circumstances. It shouldn't be mentioned in your personal statement but can be mentioned in your reference. If you've already applied, and haven't informed them, then please contact them as soon as possible and provide medical evidence. They'll hopefully take it into account should you fail to meet your offer.
    Thanks for your reply. I get what you mean exactly.
    I just find it frustrating. However, I'm still going to work hard and follow your advice of writing to the uni's. Thanks for your help!
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    I can't offer any advice, but good luck to you!
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    I don't think that's fair either- it's amazing that you managed to return to sit exams after a major illness.

    I think you should see if you can appeal the decision in some way and provide a medical note to explain how bad things were.
    In all honesty I think they should allow you to take your predicted grade but that never happens!
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    it's not just unfair, it's inhumane!! you having the courage to take all the exams in this condition should be enough to earn that extra percentage!


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    That doesn't sound right to me. A reasonable adjustment would be to give you the extra 2%.

    I have a brain injury too. I was "lucky" that mine came a month after starting secondary school and not anywhere near important exams.
 
 
 
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