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    Hello. So basically I have offers from both UCL and Edinburgh and am a little unsure which to firm. I'm leaning towards UCL at the moment but I'm quite worried that I might make the wrong choice. I love that both London and Edinburgh are steeped in history; what I feel is great about Edinburgh is that it's closer to the more scenic parts of Scotland so I can go on walking trips (and cry at the perfection of nature.) most weekends, but for London, it's more cosmopolitan and the British Museum is just a couple of doors away and I'll get to watch David Tennant in Richard II.

    Are there any current medical students at these two med schools that can give me some advice about the medicine course or any selling points about the university or city that might help me reach a decision?
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    Hi I am currently a first year medical student at Edinburgh (don't know anything about UCL though).

    Edinburgh is a really great city - lots of history, the medical school is a really old building and has so many famous alumni Joseph Lister, James Young Simpson and Charles Darwin to name just a few. In first year the majority of your lectures will be held in the anatomy lecture theatre, the oldest lecture theatre in the northern hemispere which is still in use so there is a lot of character.
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    bump!
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    (Original post by Anhedonia)
    bump!
    Hey, I think I will have a similar problem this year (received the UCL offer already :3 ><)

    It would be great if you could tell me which you finally chose and the reasons behind it. And more importantly, whether you think it was the right decision!
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    UCL.

    Most weekends, you'll be able to go on walking trips to the scenic parts of Camden and stand breathless at vistas of the Earth High Street. Weep at the perfection of Koko's as the warm breeze of kebabs drifts over you. From over the horizon, faint echoes of thrash metal from the Electric Ballroom will pluck on your soul like a harpsichord in your heart.
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    Going to the same medical school as Darwin (Edinburgh) would be pretty phenomenal. If you have future plans to work in London, take a few years studying in a new city.


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    Go to Edinburgh, you'll probably be learning from textbooks written by Edinburgh grads, learning about diseases and treatments discovered by Edinburgh grads. Depending on where you are from Edinburgh is a very nice city to live in as well.
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    (Original post by Okorange)
    Go to Edinburgh, you'll probably be learning from textbooks written by Edinburgh grads, learning about diseases and treatments discovered by Edinburgh grads. Depending on where you are from Edinburgh is a very nice city to live in as well.
    Do you mean as an Edinburgh medical student or as a Medical student in general? Because a UCL friend said a similar thing about UCL! (with regards to anatomy anyway....a book called DP?)

    Also, does it really matter that much? :P

    Thanks for your help!
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    Also, for those of you kind enough to help me out, here are my positive and negative points. It's generally a case of course&teaching hospitals VS university&city.

    UCL:
    I *slightly* prefer the traditional course (clinical, pre-clinical split), but not by much.
    Full body dissection! #wannabesurgeon
    I do love the choice of iBSCs on offer, and the notion that an intercalation from UCL can involve the top research hospitals it is linked to.
    Clinical years at UCL might set me up for Foundation Years in London?
    I love the multiculturalism and student body.
    -ve: would like to leave London, but not overly fussed
    -ve: university and med school seems far too overcrowded
    -ve: expensive

    Edinburgh:
    Love the city environment (went there as a kid) and kinda want to leave London! @exceptional @clip
    Love the beauty of the university itself (e.g. architecture, less crowded) and the library.
    Less expensive
    -ve: reputation (?) and choice of BSCs inferior AND only 18 places (WTF)
    -ve: teaching hospital can be overcrowded, I've heard ppl often sent to far out hospitals for clinical years
    -ve: no full body dissection

    Thanks in advance to any help. Sorry for long post!
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    (Original post by Choyster54)
    Do you mean as an Edinburgh medical student or as a Medical student in general? Because a UCL friend said a similar thing about UCL! (with regards to anatomy anyway....a book called DP?)

    Also, does it really matter that much? :P

    Thanks for your help!



    Are all textbooks that people use and were written by Edinburgh grads. It doesn't mean anything its just a nice touch. The books are used by medical students generally and almost every library has them, does it make a difference? Not in the slightest haha. Should you buy them? No, you'll most likely be using lecture notes to study anyways and anytime you need a textbook you could just review them in the library.

    Your school is blinded so doing your clinical years in London does not give you any advantage when it comes to FY apps. Honestly, if you do go to medical school at UCL you may actually be tired of London after 6 years.

    Reptuation wise I wouldn't say UCL is any better than Edinburgh. Edinburgh definitely has much of the historical prestige, you really are going to a university that many of the medical greats went to. If you are more interested in the here and now however, UCL does have more research going on than Edinburgh does.

    I believe about 40% of the class gets to intercalate.

    You can't go wrong either way, but if I were you I would probably be interested in getting away from London for 6 years and then returning for foundation years and going to a great school while i'm at it.

    Check the website out for Edinburgh
    https://www.eemec.med.ed.ac.uk/
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    (Original post by Okorange)


    Are all textbooks that people use and were written by Edinburgh grads. It doesn't mean anything its just a nice touch. The books are used by medical students generally and almost every library has them, does it make a difference? Not in the slightest haha. Should you buy them? No, you'll most likely be using lecture notes to study anyways and anytime you need a textbook you could just review them in the library.

    Your school is blinded so doing your clinical years in London does not give you any advantage when it comes to FY apps. Honestly, if you do go to medical school at UCL you may actually be tired of London after 6 years.

    Reptuation wise I wouldn't say UCL is any better than Edinburgh. Edinburgh definitely has much of the historical prestige, you really are going to a university that many of the medical greats went to. If you are more interested in the here and now however, UCL does have more research going on than Edinburgh does.

    I believe about 40% of the class gets to intercalate.

    You can't go wrong either way, but if I were you I would probably be interested in getting away from London for 6 years and then returning for foundation years and going to a great school while i'm at it.

    Check the website out for Edinburgh
    https://www.eemec.med.ed.ac.uk/
    Thank you very much for your help; your comments make a lot of sense. I'll double check the stat about number of people who get to intercalate (I think I read the "18" places number from a secondary source). If the BSCs are as good as (or almost as good as) UCL then that may sway me

    Still open to any other suggestions btw !
    [Okorange might be ever so slightly biased ]
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    (Original post by Okorange)




    Muir's Pathology is a terrible book imo, better off reading Robbins or Underwood. Cunningham's Manual of Practical Anatomy is out of print and pretty useless in the current medical curriculum as no dissection is involved!

    Davidsons and Macloeds are good to have though. They're currently written by staff at Edinburgh/NHS Lothian which is handy as Davidson's largely follows the course and many of the chapters are written by the same people giving you the lectures. Similar for Macleods.

    Grants ans Hutchisons are may be originally written by Edinburgh people but not anymore.


    Reptuation wise I wouldn't say UCL is any better than Edinburgh. Edinburgh definitely has much of the historical prestige, you really are going to a university that many of the medical greats went to. If you are more interested in the here and now however, UCL does have more research going on than Edinburgh does.

    I believe about 40% of the class gets to intercalate.

    You can't go wrong either way, but if I were you I would probably be interested in getting away from London for 6 years and then returning for foundation years and going to a great school while i'm at it.

    Check the website out for Edinburgh
    https://www.eemec.med.ed.ac.uk/
    Research wise, I would actually say Edinburgh performs very well given that it has a much much smaller population than London but as an undergraduate it hardly makes a difference. When you get to a PG level you'll see that Edinburgh and UCL will have their own research interests rather than one being definitely better.

    From 2016 entry onwards, everyone will do the intercalated degree at Edinburgh ie it will become a six year course. My year (starting intercalating in Sept 2015) will have 130 places and this number will increase by 10 every year until the 2016 entry cohort where everyone will do it.
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    (Original post by Asklepios)


    Muir's Pathology is a terrible book imo, better off reading Robbins or Underwood. Cunningham's Manual of Practical Anatomy is out of print and pretty useless in the current medical curriculum as no dissection is involved!

    Davidsons and Macloeds are good to have though. They're currently written by staff at Edinburgh/NHS Lothian which is handy as Davidson's largely follows the course and many of the chapters are written by the same people giving you the lectures. Similar for Macleods.

    Grants ans Hutchisons are may be originally written by Edinburgh people but not anymore.




    Research wise, I would actually say Edinburgh performs very well given that it has a much much smaller population than London but as an undergraduate it hardly makes a difference. When you get to a PG level you'll see that Edinburgh and UCL will have their own research interests rather than one being definitely better.

    From 2016 entry onwards, everyone will do the intercalated degree at Edinburgh ie it will become a six year course. My year (starting intercalating in Sept 2015) will have 130 places and this number will increase by 10 every year until the 2016 entry cohort where everyone will do it.
    I guess this textbook thing will help then. I heard that the anatomy examiner/professor at UCL lifts the end of year examination questions straight from the textbook he wrote and the lectures he gives! - might be a similar situation at Edinburgh?

    Thank you for the information about the intercalations - very helpful. It would be nice if I could see the BSCs on offer in detail though. Edinburgh only lists them on the website, but UCL details the precise syllabus for each, including which (distinguished) research groups run them!

    In addition to the points I mentioned, there are two more things my medic friend (at Imperial = no bias) told me to ask about:
    a) Are there differences in international prospects. e.g. Imperial and Cambridge are very good if you want to work overseas one day. I know Edinburgh historically had many links to US but not sure if this is still the case? How are electives and exchanges like?
    b) Is the learning environment different? At UCL I heard there is a "silent competitiveness" and a teaching slant towards pathology and internal med, whereas Imperial is "openly/geekily competitive" with a big slant towards surgery.

    Again, thanks for all zee help. Appreciate the fact that you're all busy med students (but then again, you probably understand my predicament!)
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    (Original post by Choyster54)
    I guess this textbook thing will help then. I heard that the anatomy examiner/professor at UCL lifts the end of year examination questions straight from the textbook he wrote and the lectures he gives! - might be a similar situation at Edinburgh?
    All our questions are pretty much out of the anatomy workbook we get. Most people use the various popular texts to learn anatomy and then go over the workbook along side an atlas before the exam to revise.

    Thank you for the information about the intercalations - very helpful. It would be nice if I could see the BSCs on offer in detail though. Edinburgh only lists them on the website, but UCL details the precise syllabus for each, including which (distinguished) research groups run them!
    If you PM me your email address, I can maybe send you a copy of the information booklet

    In addition to the points I mentioned, there are two more things my medic friend (at Imperial = no bias) told me to ask about:
    a) Are there differences in international prospects. e.g. Imperial and Cambridge are very good if you want to work overseas one day. I know Edinburgh historically had many links to US but not sure if this is still the case? How are electives and exchanges like?
    b) Is the learning environment different? At UCL I heard there is a "silent competitiveness" and a teaching slant towards pathology and internal med, whereas Imperial is "openly/geekily competitive" with a big slant towards surgery.

    Again, thanks for all zee help. Appreciate the fact that you're all busy med students (but then again, you probably understand my predicament!)
    Electives are pretty much standard whichever medical school you go into. You can go anywhere really if you plan in advance! I'm not so sure about exchanges as I don't think our course (or indeed any UK medical course) really allows for exchanges. I know there is some sort of link with the University of Leiden and some people who intercalate in Pharmacology have been able to do their honours projects there but I'm afraid I don't know the full details.

    I wouldn't say it's all that competitive. There are a few 'gunners' but generally most people try and support eachother. I wouldn't say there's a definite slant in the teaching, but a lot of the preclinical modules are organised by pathologists so pathology naturally comes into that But we get plenty of teaching from basic scientists and clinicians too. I can't comment on clinical teaching.

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    (Original post by Choyster54)
    I guess this textbook thing will help then. I heard that the anatomy examiner/professor at UCL lifts the end of year examination questions straight from the textbook he wrote and the lectures he gives! - might be a similar situation at Edinburgh?

    Thank you for the information about the intercalations - very helpful. It would be nice if I could see the BSCs on offer in detail though. Edinburgh only lists them on the website, but UCL details the precise syllabus for each, including which (distinguished) research groups run them!

    In addition to the points I mentioned, there are two more things my medic friend (at Imperial = no bias) told me to ask about:
    a) Are there differences in international prospects. e.g. Imperial and Cambridge are very good if you want to work overseas one day. I know Edinburgh historically had many links to US but not sure if this is still the case? How are electives and exchanges like?
    b) Is the learning environment different? At UCL I heard there is a "silent competitiveness" and a teaching slant towards pathology and internal med, whereas Imperial is "openly/geekily competitive" with a big slant towards surgery.

    Again, thanks for all zee help. Appreciate the fact that you're all busy med students (but then again, you probably understand my predicament!)
    Edinburgh has an exchange with Columbia's medical school, something only Bart's also has at least from the UK.

    http://ps.columbia.edu/education/aca...iting-students

    Generally though, most schools are open like Harvard and Yale will take people for electives from almost any medical school providing they provide the application fee (which can be very expensive) and spaces are limited.

    Edinburgh definitely has a great reputation in medicine, you won't have much trouble if you end up going overseas with recognition.
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    (Original post by lupita1)
    ur so lucky to get an offer from UCL! omg :eek:

    but yeah i applied to edinburgh this year as it has 'old world' prestige as well as the fact that it doesnt require interview...

    may i ask, what are you stats? and are you international?

    lucky basterd
    Thanks for your kind words I feel very blessed and am grateful that I have an offer so early in the process!

    As you can gather from my previous posts on this thread, I have lived in London all my life.

    I am ethnically chinese, however - if it means anything? Truly, I consider myself British through and through.

    I don't feel so comfortable about posting my stats on this thread. I've done enough boasting and selling myself throughout the application process already. Let's just say that my stats are very good. I can PM you the details if you want/if it will help you.
 
 
 
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