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    I am an university graduate. I have a degree in Animation. I also have qualifications in various art related stuff, such as: Multimedia, Graphic Design, Art and Design.
    I draw using a number of different types of material, the same with animation and graphics.
    I have been sending CVs through Email and ringing up various art related companies and shops. And they almost always ignore me, and when I ring up, a lot of the time they are frosty and rude.
    Anyone know why this is the case?
    Someone said to me, they maybe getting too many CVs/Emails and can't reply to them. I am not sure if this is true. If it is, then it means art companies must not be very good companies, because there missing out on potential employers and clients.
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    (Original post by Curtis Donovan)
    I am an university graduate. I have a degree in Animation. I also have qualifications in various art related stuff, such as: Multimedia, Graphic Design, Art and Design.
    I draw using a number of different types of material, the same with animation and graphics.
    I have been sending CVs through Email and ringing up various art related companies and shops. And they almost always ignore me, and when I ring up, a lot of the time they are frosty and rude.
    Anyone know why this is the case?
    Someone said to me, they maybe getting too many CVs/Emails and can't reply to them. I am not sure if this is true. If it is, then it means art companies must not be very good companies, because there missing out on potential employers and clients.
    Companies in these kinds of fields get a stready stream of CVs every day and it simply isn't practical for the company to reply to them. they also don't welcome people ringing up on spec as that takes up valuable work time to no particular advantage. I'm afraid I should get used to it, and definitely stop calling. If they have a vacancy it is likely they will advertise, and they will likely have more than enough quality candidates to pick and choose from.

    Like you, I wish life were different and more friendly but it isn't and it's unlikely to change!
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    It's probably normal for the industry. You have to try and find another way through. Bear in mind that:

    a) the person picking up the phone is VERY LIKELY not to be person who is remotely interested in getting any new talent into the company, because it is not their job. So, you are just going to get the pat response.

    b) they won't have any HR. If you work for a small company, there isn't anyone else available to do hiring, or run a 'talent base'. Employing people is something they will do on a needs-must basis, and even then I doubt they will have the capacity to advertise nationally, run a short list of ten and a second interview. It's probably more a cup of tea with a likely candidate and a chat.

    I would have thought you need to find a way of building up individual contacts, who will ring you if they need someone. Try not to equate any of this with the companies not being 'any good' - once you have been the one picking up the phone you will see it differently! good luck
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    (Original post by Curtis Donovan)
    I am an university graduate. I have a degree in Animation. I also have qualifications in various art related stuff, such as: Multimedia, Graphic Design, Art and Design.
    I draw using a number of different types of material, the same with animation and graphics.
    I have been sending CVs through Email and ringing up various art related companies and shops. And they almost always ignore me, and when I ring up, a lot of the time they are frosty and rude.
    Anyone know why this is the case?
    Someone said to me, they maybe getting too many CVs/Emails and can't reply to them. I am not sure if this is true. If it is, then it means art companies must not be very good companies, because there missing out on potential employers and clients.
    It's nothing to do with being art companies, its entirely standard business practice. Do you answer every piece of unsolicited mail you get? No you don't, and you certainly wouldn't if you were a business where time is money. If companies want staff, they go out and find them. If you send in an unsolicited CV, then I'm afraid you are taking pot luck, and chances are that most if not all will get no response - and that goes for nearly all companies in all sectors of business.
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    In due respect when I was at Uni they told me to ring up art companies etc. To ask about work and send CVs/Cover letters.
    I am pretty certain that's the normal way to go about getting jobs at these sorts of companies and getting jobs in general. If you go that extra mile, it shows your keen or that's what I was lead to believe from Uni.
    I don't think there's any other way people can get jobs as animators/artists etc. If you just sit around waiting for jobs being advertised you won't get them. Also I do reply to advertised jobs but they ignore me.
    I don't buy this stuff about they can't reply to all emails.
    If they can't reply to emails. Employ more staff and if they can't do that then without being rude maybe they shouldn't be a company. Anyway the emails could be for work.
    I think going freelance is probably my best option
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    (Original post by Curtis Donovan)
    In due respect when I was at Uni they told me to ring up art companies etc. To ask about work and send CVs/Cover letters.
    I am pretty certain that's the normal way to go about getting jobs at these sorts of companies and getting jobs in general. If you go that extra mile, it shows your keen or that's what I was lead to believe from Uni.
    I don't think there's any other way people can get jobs as animators/artists etc. If you just sit around waiting for jobs being advertised you won't get them. Also I do reply to advertised jobs but they ignore me.
    I don't buy this stuff about they can't reply to all emails.
    If they can't reply to emails. Employ more staff and if they can't do that then without being rude maybe they shouldn't be a company. Anyway the emails could be for work.
    I think going freelance is probably my best option
    With due respect to your lecturers they do not live in the real world of work. If they did they would know that constantly fielding calls from enthusiastic graduates is a royal pain in the arse and does very little to enamour one either to them or what they have to offer. Everyone is keen to get work, everyone is hungry for experience, that is a given.

    Companies are businesses, they exist to make money not to make friends with people. Employing more staff costs money which, with no business benefit, would be completely wasteful. If they are going to waste money I'm sure every company owner could find many more pleasurable ways to use that wasted cash than hiring people to cheer up people in your position.
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    (Original post by TV man)
    With due respect to your lecturers they do not live in the real world of work. If they did they would know that constantly fielding calls from enthusiastic graduates is a royal pain in the arse and does very little to enamour one either to them or what they have to offer. Everyone is keen to get work, everyone is hungry for experience, that is a given.

    Companies are businesses, they exist to make money not to make friends with people. Employing more staff costs money which, with no business benefit, would be completely wasteful. If they are going to waste money I'm sure every company owner could find many more pleasurable ways to use that wasted cash than hiring people to cheer up people in your position.
    I think you're being too harsh on this guy. How else is he going to get places he wants to work at to pay attention to him other than by contacting them, particularly if he isn't lucky enough to have friends in high places.
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    (Original post by Brighten)
    I think you're being too harsh on this guy. How else is he going to get places he wants to work at to pay attention to him other than by contacting them, particularly if he isn't lucky enough to have friends in high places.
    Yes, it's tough but what I am giving him is the companies' point of view, what I am saying is that it is likely simply to aggravate the people who he is hoping to impress. It may work on rare occasions but it will irritate and alienate potential employers more often than not.

    And it's not me that makes these rules of life, it's the world!
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    Unfortunately for us, like most jobs nowadays, it's about who you know.
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    *wades in*

    TV man is just telling it how it is.

    It IS about who you know, but it isn't JUST about who you know. It would be wrong to think that all people in creative industries get their foot in the job because they have contacts. But once you ARE in, you become the person people need to know in order to get in. This will happen.

    So, OP, you need to find other ways of making a meaningful connection with people working where you want to work. Do not think that it is the directors you need to impress, you would probably be a lot better off getting in with the guy who does the entry-level job. For when he, or she, is promoted (as they surely will be), then the company will need to replace him/her. And guess what? They won't place a job advert in the national media, they won't turn to their CV files (they won't keep them and even if they did, it would be out of date within a month). And they won't talk to their HR department, because they don't have one. They will ask the guy who they are promoting if he has any mates that could do his job - for this is the easiest way.

    Think creatively if you want to get on in the creative industries and plan a different line of attack.

    Also, try not to think of people 'ignoring' your CVs - I understand why you feel like this, but it is not a personal thing at their end.
 
 
 
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