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    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    Yes, but discuss with a teacher who already "knows" the meaning of the text and has a curriculum/mark-scheme that the children will have to follow.
    The point being, you ultimately have to come to and back up your own conclusions about the text, you are supposed to explore the text yourself. The analogy ultimately ends, because when you are being formally examined there is a right, known, mark scheme, with a religious there is just someones opinion. My original point was I cannot see any value in being indoctrinated in what the teaching of a religious text are, its a lifelong personal journey its not fixed to an standardised exam on a fixed date.
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    (Original post by doggyfizzel)
    The point being, you ultimately have to come to and back up your own conclusions about the text, you are supposed to explore the text yourself. The analogy ultimately ends, because when you are being formally examined there is a right, known, mark scheme, with a religious there is just someones opinion. My original point was I cannot see any value in being indoctrinated in what the teaching of a religious text are, its a lifelong personal journey its not fixed to an standardised exam on a fixed date.
    That's not quite the point I was trying to make - I was trying to say that in the same way you wouldn't call just giving a book to a child English education, you can't just give the Bible to a child and expect them to understand it. In both cases you need guidance and education that will give you a starting point in understanding and give you the tools you need to go on understanding new books/scripture in the future. If what a faith school does is simply indoctrinate children with "this is what Christians do" without helping them to understand the faith then clearly they're doing it wrong, but I don't see the problem with giving the children an environment that supports them as they develop their spiritual knowledge as well as their education, vs the secular state school system of worrying about which Christmas carols can be sung in the last assembly before the holidays because it would be a moral outrage to ask a child to sing the words "hail the heaven-born prince of peace" in a song firmly embedded in the country's culture.
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    I'm also against. I went to a Christian faith primary school until year 3, where hymns were sung in morning assembly and the students jointly said grace before eating their food at lunchtime. I didn't have any bad experiences with it (I was Christian at the time - my dad is a creationist), but what bothers me is that I might have stayed Christian. If I'd have gone to Christian schools all my life, I might well have been totally indoctrinated into believing things which I now believe to be false. Teaching children to follow a religion, as far as I'm concerned, is wrong, because it takes advantage of their vulnerability to trust what adults tell them. Let people discover religion in their own time if they wish to, but don't surround them with it, in effect forcing it on them.
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    Surely it is best for children to be educated in a class of mixed beliefs or none. Children who play together from age 4 don't grow up to think that their christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Atheist etc. friends are demons.

    This is one of the strengths of the comprehensive system that it is all inclusive. The benefit to society as a whole is immeasurable and one of the reasons why the UK taken as a whole is much more tolerant than many other countries.

    Just look at Northern Ireland to see what segregating children according to religion leads to.
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    (Original post by miser)
    Teaching children to follow a religion, as far as I'm concerned, is wrong, because it takes advantage of their vulnerability to trust what adults tell them. Let people discover religion in their own time if they wish to, but don't surround them with it, in effect forcing it on them.
    I agree, but this issue goes way beyond faith schools. I've never actually met someone who was raised to believe in nothing religious, but to keep an open mind for the future when they can actually make an independent decision. That's a real real problem.
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    (Original post by Rosaknows)
    Against definitely.
    1) it deprives many young children to socialise with people of other religions - can lead to discriminatory behaviour
    2) it encloses children to all think in the same way - more narrow minded
    3) it deprives children from exploring different faiths
    4) it scares children into doing what god wants, when actually they should be learning from their own mistakes.
    ^ Exactly this. I'm religious but forcing children into religion does make them resent it, and even as a religious person you need to be as open minded as possible, which can be neglected in a faith school.
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    (Original post by Xotol)
    I agree, but this issue goes way beyond faith schools. I've never actually met someone who was raised to believe in nothing religious, but to keep an open mind for the future when they can actually make an independent decision. That's a real real problem.
    Yeah, I totally agree. But it is very difficult (and dubious) to make policies around how people should raise their children; the best we can do is promote that preferred mentality and make policies in the areas which permit them, like schools.
 
 
 
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