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how to know if you're good at maths Watch

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    lots of opinions...

    (Original post by Noble.)
    If you have trouble understanding A-level concepts fully, then University maths will be pretty near impossible. The only way you can survive is by thoroughly understanding, since very little of it is actually learning an equation/theorem and then simply applying it; there's a substantial amount that not only requires you to understand definitions/theorems, but also see through them and what it really means when applied in different situations.
    just out of interest, how long did it take you to understand a level mathematical concepts? was it almost instant, or did you just understand them very well after working on them for a long time?
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    (Original post by genuinelydense)
    lots of opinions...


    just out of interest, how long did it take you to understand a level mathematical concepts? was it almost instant, or did you just understand them very well after working on them for a long time?
    It was pretty much instantly, if I'm honest. I wish the same could be said for maths I'm doing now :lol:
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    I don't know if anyone asked but, do YOU want to do Maths at university level? Or rather, what do you want to do?

    My sister was an excellent science student on the route to go to Medical school. She liked sciences but she didn't want to spend her life doing that so she did Economics instead. She now holds an Economics first class degree waiting to pursue her masters at LSE. The moral of my 'story' is that, my parents pressured her into doing medicine but she chose the route she'd love and she loved what came after.

    C1 and C2 do not determine you as a fit student at university mathematics level but could be a good sign. If it is what you want to do, you can work towards it because you have the brain for it. Good job on 198 :O
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    I think the 'issue' is, doing badly in A-Level maths is, without a doubt, a sign you'd not do well at University mathematics, so people assume the inverse "doing well at A-Level maths implies you'll do well at University maths" holds, and it doesn't really.
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    As a little deviation (that's quite less than the standard deviation from the mean, which means I'm not spamming and I'm not an outlier or a rogue result or a troll), how is that Maths graduates are the most well paid? Excuse me for my ignorance but this is the easiest way to find out.

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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    As a little deviation (that's quite less than the standard deviation from the mean, which means I'm not spamming and I'm not an outlier or a rogue result or a troll), how is that Maths graduates are the most well paid? Excuse me for my ignorance but this is the easiest way to find out.

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    I don't think they are... However, a lot (especially from top Universities) go into front office finance jobs which bumps the average up somewhat.
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    (Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
    It's hard to tell whether you would like a maths degree based on whether or not you enjoy doing A-Level C-modules, though - University maths is arguably more detached from it's A-Level counterpart than any other discipline with an A-Level course; it's very different.

    @OP; the best you can do is read around the subject on undergraduate-style topics and attempt questions that require you to think/be flexible mathematically (as suggested by Indeterminate, STEP is a good place for such questions). Then you may be able to make a good decision.

    That said, your results still suggest that you probably aren't as bad at maths as you're saying so it's definitely worth consideration.
    Yeah you can say goodbye to numbers, there aren't any in degree maths.
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    (Original post by foolscap)
    Yeah you can say goodbye to numbers, there aren't any in degree maths.
    :lol: I was about to agree with you, then looked down at the question I'm currently working on and saw

    \langle (12)(34)(56), (145)(236) \rangle \leq S_6

    So I won't.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    :lol: I was about to agree with you, then looked down at the question I'm currently working on and saw

    \langle (12)(34)(56), (145)(236) \rangle \leq S_6

    So I won't.
    meh alright some matrices, bijections, and basis use numbers in examples.........but most of the theory is just words and notation.
    Are you a maths fresher at oxford btw ?
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    I'm very much the same - if i've been told how to do something then i can usually do it, but if i have to work out how to get an answer then i have absolutely no idea. That's why i didn't apply for a maths-based degree, because i imagine it's a lot of independent working out
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    (Original post by foolscap)
    meh alright some matrices, bijections, and basis use numbers in examples.........but most of the theory is just words and notation.
    Are you a maths fresher at oxford btw ?
    I'm in first year, but not a fresher - I had to suspend my studies for a year.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I'm in first year, but not a fresher - I had to suspend my studies for a year.
    ah ok I just wondered what the difference between an oxbridge course and mine was ie. increase in difficulty/workload.
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    (Original post by foolscap)
    ah ok I just wondered what the difference between an oxbridge course and mine was ie. increase in difficulty/workload.
    Dunno really, if you're interested, this is the first year course at Oxford.

    http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/courses/material

    It's everything under "Prelims".
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Dunno really, if you're interested, this is the first year course at Oxford.

    http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/courses/material

    It's everything under "Prelims".
    Seemed very similar to what I'm doing, although some of the group questions looked nasty.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I think the 'issue' is, doing badly in A-Level maths is, without a doubt, a sign you'd not do well at University mathematics, so people assume the contrapositive "doing well at A-Level maths implies you'll do well at University maths" holds, and it doesn't really.
    erm - the contrapositive is "doing well at Uni level Maths implies you would not do badly at A level Maths" which I think holds

    OP's reaction to this nit-picking could be important. If she sees it as irrelevant, then probably Maths is not her thing even if she is good at it so far. If she lol's then maybe there's a mathmo there ...
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    (Original post by ian.slater)
    erm - the contrapositive is "doing well at Uni level Maths implies you would not do badly at A level Maths" which I think holds

    OP's reaction to this nit-picking could be important. If she sees it as irrelevant, then probably Maths is not her thing even if she is good at it so far. If she lol's then maybe there's a mathmo there ...
    Sorry, yes, I didn't mean contrapositive just the inverse statement.
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    First off, congrats on those results . 198/200 is amazing.

    I think, if you have trouble understanding the proofs of things, and, as you said yourself, you prefer applying the maths to "real-world" scenarios, you'd probably be better off with something like Engineering.

    That is, if you want to do a science/maths based subject. I really don't think you should do one just because your parents/teachers think you might do well in it on the basis of two AS Level modules, one of which is only slightly harder than GCSE.
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    (Original post by genuinelydense)
    hello.

    i recently sat my c1 and c2 papers and got 198 ums marks overall; my parents have started hinting that i should take mathematically-based degree (engineering, theoretical physics etc.), but i don't that i'm not very good at maths! i can't derive any of the formulae (if the cosine rule were not in the info. booklet i would have been in trouble in the exam!) and sometimes struggle with the solomon paper questions, which require more application of knowledge and are less HERP DERP in general.

    are these things indicative of a non-mathematical mind? if so, is a mathematical degree a no-no?

    C1 and C2 is Dead easy , you can't indicate whether you are that good to study maths in uni based on your C1 and C2 grades . if you are doing Further mathematics and you got an A in your FP2 and M3 , then I would say you are a genius and would be wasted not to Mathematics in uni .
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    I disagree, C1 and C2 aren't that easy, I got 86 in C1 then got 91 in FP1 in the same year


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    (Original post by TheJoshwha)
    I disagree, C1 and C2 aren't that easy, I got 86 in C1 then got 91 in FP1 in the same year


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    i got 98 in fp1 and 100 in fp3. Both exams ran back to back too :eek:


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