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how to know if you're good at maths Watch

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    (Original post by genuinelydense)
    hello.

    i recently sat my c1 and c2 papers and got 198 ums marks overall; my parents have started hinting that i should take mathematically-based degree (engineering, theoretical physics etc.), but i don't that i'm not very good at maths! i can't derive any of the formulae (if the cosine rule were not in the info. booklet i would have been in trouble in the exam!) and sometimes struggle with the solomon paper questions, which require more application of knowledge and are less HERP DERP in general.

    are these things indicative of a non-mathematical mind? if so, is a mathematical degree a no-no?
    My advice is simple: do whatever degree you truly want to do. Everything else will fall in place.

    I agree that your (admittedly excellent) marks in C1 and C2 do not tell you much about your mathematical ability. Having said that, there's nothing to suggest you don't have ability either!

    If you want to do Biology, go for it (you'll still need some maths for it though)
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I don't think they are... However, a lot (especially from top Universities) go into front office finance jobs which bumps the average up somewhat.
    Just an FYI, I think Oxford maths has recently overtaken Imperial maths for highest average grad salary (though as you suggest, the overall distribution of salaries is skewed because of City jobs)
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    (Original post by shamika)
    Just an FYI, I think Oxford maths has recently overtaken Imperial maths for highest average grad salary (though as you suggest, the overall distribution of salaries is skewed because of City jobs)
    Interesting, do you know why Oxford's avg. salary has overtaken Imperial's? Has there been a drop in the proportion going onto getting a PhD?
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    (Original post by genuinelydense)
    everyone knows that maths a-level is a joke; you never have to apply your knowledge at all, which is what i have a problem with. i interpret this inability to apply my knowledge to harder questions (like the ones posed on brilliant.org) as a funamental inability to understand mathematical concepts, and god knows i worked hard to try to understand them (there's a funny thread of mine wherein i repeatedly misunderstood people's explanations of the binomial theorem)!

    and finally, as vain as it sounds, i'd like to really excel in the subject that i study at uni--and that's not gonna happen if i study maths.
    I would consider though the fact that you may only not be applying your knowledge well because you've never had to before. You have no practice in it and your instinct tells you to look for an algorithm to follow to get a right answer. This may become better with more practice.

    Not saying you should take maths if you don't want to, just something to bear in mind!

    xxx
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Interesting, do you know why Oxford's avg. salary has overtaken Imperial's? Has there been a drop in the proportion going onto getting a PhD?
    No idea, sorry. I don't even know if the statement is true (I think someone on TSR mentioned it to me whilst we were discussing Imperial).

    I always find these kind of facts a bit misleading, because it gives grads a sense of entitlement. The reality is, no one is guaranteed a job after graduating, and you have to earn it. Whilst people from better universities tend to be better employees, that's not fact and there are plenty of people from a wide range of universities who excel in their careers.
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    (Original post by TheJoshwha)
    I disagree, C1 and C2 aren't that easy, I got 86 in C1 then got 91 in FP1 in the same year


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    FP1 is just as easy as C1/C2 tbh, they moved all the difficult content to FP2/FP3.
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    (Original post by genuinelydense)
    hello.

    i recently sat my c1 and c2 papers and got 198 ums marks overall; my parents have started hinting that i should take mathematically-based degree (engineering, theoretical physics etc.), but i don't that i'm not very good at maths! i can't derive any of the formulae (if the cosine rule were not in the info. booklet i would have been in trouble in the exam!) and sometimes struggle with the solomon paper questions, which require more application of knowledge and are less HERP DERP in general.

    are these things indicative of a non-mathematical mind? if so, is a mathematical degree a no-no?
    Depends, something like that might hinder you if you do actually do a maths degree, but when it comes to something like engineering where it's more "plug and chug" applied maths, it may not be a problem.

    Passion/interest is a huge factor as well. Do you have an interest in maths?
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Depends, something like that might hinder you if you do actually do a maths degree, but when it comes to something like engineering where it's more "plug and chug" applied maths, it may not be a problem.

    Passion/interest is a huge factor as well. Do you have an interest in maths?
    i enjoy learning and understanding mathematical concepts, then applying them; however, the problem that i have is understanding the concepts. tbh i've never really found the idea oif X engineering PARTICULARLY interesting tbh and the idea of not needing to understand concepts to do well slightly disheartens me--i'd like some reward for the hard work (even though i enjoy it :P)!

    on that note, are there any economics/(theoretical) physics students here? if so, are they as 'plug and chug' as engineering courses?

    again, thanks for all of the replies!!
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    (Original post by genuinelydense)
    i enjoy understanding concepts and applying them. the problem that i have is understanding the concepts. i'veve ver really found the idea oif X engineering PARTICULARLY interesting tbh and the idea of not needing to understand concepts to do well slightly disheartens me--i'd like some reward for the hard work (even though i enjoy it :P)!

    on that noteare there any economics/(theoretical) physics students here? if so, are they as 'plug and chug' as engineering courses??

    again, thanks for all of the replies!!
    Don't get me wrong, you definitely need to understand the concepts when it comes to engineering, it's just more like a continuation of what you're doing at A-level rather than uni maths which is very different. You don't need that 'mathematical intuition' to do well in engineering.

    I can't really comment on those other courses as I don't know anything about them, but I'm sure there are others who can help you out with those.
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    FP1 is just as easy as C1/C2 tbh, they moved all the difficult content to FP2/FP3.
    There was a much smaller number of A's for FP1 than the C1/2. And FP2 doesn't seem much harder. That may be because I'm a year older and a year more experienced with maths


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    (Original post by TheJoshwha)
    There was a much smaller number of A's for FP1 than the C1/2. And FP2 doesn't seem much harder. That may be because I'm a year older and a year more experienced with maths


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well, personally when it comes to A-level maths/f.maths it's all the same, just new content... but many people find C1/C2/FP1 etc easier than the A2 modules :dontknow:
 
 
 
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