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    I'm doing the LITB3 exam in june and I'm studying frankenstein, the bloody chamber and macbeth. i know what assessment objectives i need to include but I'm wondering if anyone has any pointers on how to maybe structure the essay well or any important bits of information i can put in to reach the higher grades? I'm trying to get an A but its soooo hard! anyone who has done this exam or has good knowledge on it please help, I'm not looking forward to this exam at all!!
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    Hi I am also sitting this exam, the texts I am studying are The Pardoners Prologue and Tale, Macbeth and Frankenstein. I hope someone can post some helpful info!


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    (Original post by Milkand3sugars)
    I'm doing the LITB3 exam in june and I'm studying frankenstein, the bloody chamber and macbeth. i know what assessment objectives i need to include but I'm wondering if anyone has any pointers on how to maybe structure the essay well or any important bits of information i can put in to reach the higher grades? I'm trying to get an A but its soooo hard! anyone who has done this exam or has good knowledge on it please help, I'm not looking forward to this exam at all!!
    Hey I just got an A* in my mock, so if you want, I can type up my essays for you, I did Frankenstein on Section A and used Lady of the House of Love for my Carter story on Section B (along with doing the other 2 texts obv)
    Let me know!
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    (Original post by sofie01)
    hey i just got an a* in my mock, so if you want, i can type up my essays for you, i did frankenstein on section a and used lady of the house of love for my carter story on section b (along with doing the other 2 texts obv)
    let me know!
    do it please!
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    (Original post by MusicalEmma)
    do it please!
    I'll do it for you on Friday
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    (Original post by MusicalEmma)
    do it please!
    Hey, I have no clue how to attatch files so I'm gonna just copy and paste
    A2 Mock examination
    Section A (I chose Frankenstein)
    To what extent do you agree with the view that, in Frankenstein, Mary Shelley is exploring the dark side of the human psyche?
    Within the question, the dark side of the human psyche means the suppressed desires and hidden dangerous thoughts of the characters, explored through both the character’s conscious and unconscious mind. In relation to Frankenstein, his dark side is explored through dreams and actions of a dark nature which the monster inspires Victor to do. It could also relate to society viewing the monster as an outcast, and so turning him to the dark side of his psyche.
    Firstly, the dark side of Victor is explored when he first endeavours to create the monster, as he does not mind that his “unhallowed arts” include grave-robbing and going against the laws of society. It is seen here, through Shelley’s use of the word unhallowed that what Victor is doing is “a terrible, terrible sin” and yet he does not mind. This begins the exploration Shelley takes into the dark side of Victor’s psyche, as it shows him doing whatever it takes to get ahead. This is particularly interesting as Victor was brought up religiously and he even refers to all he does as sinful and “wretched”. This shows that within the dark side of the human psyche, Victor abolishes his upbringing and religion, particularly in usurping the role of God in creating “the wretch I had endeavoured to form”. His denial of God in creating the monster is rather ironic, as he views Elizabeth, with her “celestial eyes” as rather holy, yet ignores the holiest of figures throughout his creation. This could, however further the exploration into the dark side of his psyche, as it could suggest a link between women and religion. Victor appreciates both but does not feel he needs them. In usurping the role of Elizabeth in his creation, a further part of Victor’s psyche is explored. Linking to his assumed fear of sexuality, Victor’s usurpation of Elizabeth, and therefore all women links to the dream he has once the monster is, in all senses born. When, in the dream, Victor goes to kiss Elizabeth then realizes “I beheld the rotting corpse of my dead mother”, his dark side is explored further, as the dream links to sexuality and death. Also, a Freudian perspective on mother-son relationships is looked into, as he seems to be wishing to be intimate with his mother, which is part of Victor’s psyche never expressed verbally, so it is presumed to be part of the dark side of it.
    Moreover, Shelley uses the monster, with the motif of the double effectively to explore the dark side of the human psyche. To begin, Victor’s rejection of “the duties towards a creation by the creator” immediately represent the dark side of his psyche, as he only does this because the monster is seen to be a “hideous wretch” in Victor’s eyes. This, linking to his reaction towards professor Krempe, seeing him as something which he did not wish “my eyes to behold” explores the vanity in Victor’s psyche, which is a sin and so gives the novel a religious undertone. His treatment of the monster, calling him a “daemon” and making him “terrified when I viewed myself in a transparent pool” shows that he cares little for anything, no matter how vulnerable if it does not live up to his ideals. The monster being scared of his own reflection creates a parallel between him and Victor, as when he hates himself, Victor sees himself “not in deed, but in effect” as “the true murderer”. This parallel extends the motif of the double, as when the monster does something terrible, Victor feels guilty for it, which enhances the speculation that they may be one person and the monster is merely used as an “outlet for Victor’s suppressed desires”, as quoted by an unnamed critic.
    Furthermore, viewing the monster and Victor as separate characters, the dark side of the monster’s psyche seems to be explored through his reaction to the dark side of society. For example, when the De Lacy family rejects and “beat him” although he has done nothing wrong, the vanity of society is explored with a Marxist perspective. This is shown as, though he may be “hideous to society”, they do not give him a fair chance due to him being other, a typical gothic characteristic of the villain. This treatment of the monster first leads him to “abhor myself” then to abhor the world, people, and most of all, Victor. This gives Shelley a chance to explore the human psyche becoming dark, giving an element of discovery to the novel. For the most part, the monster “strangling the boy” William is his darkest act, as he rids the novel then and there of its innocence and naivety. This act seems to be the main turning point for the monster as from then on, while “even Satan had friends in his fall, I was alone”. The intertextuality of “Paradise Lost” being alluded to creates an antithesis as the reader then sees the monster as a Satan-like “fiend” and do not see him anymore as a human, but as a monster.
    Overall, I agree that Shelley explores the dark side of the human psyche through various means, devices and characters. Altogether Shelley introduces the reader to how the subconscious mind works and how it can be turned dark.

    On this, I got 32/40, and needed to explore more things in relation to the gothic and a little more analysis of Form, but apart from that it was great!
 
 
 
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