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    What foreign language would you guys consider to be most useful if you were hopin for a job in the city (eventually)?

    May seem like a silly question, only im havin the chance to pick up a language and am really unsure which i would find most useful, if any.

    thanx
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    Which city? If it were Frankfurt, I'd go for German....
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    (Original post by Zarjazz)
    Which city? If it were Frankfurt, I'd go for German....
    lol! london!
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    (Original post by prada_princess)
    lol! london!
    French, German, Spanish, Italian, etc

    its irrelevant really if you're going to be that broad - if you're more specific about what sector you want to go into, then investigate the sector yourself
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    (Original post by prada_princess)
    What foreign language would you guys consider to be most useful if you were hopin for a job in the city (eventually)?

    May seem like a silly question, only im havin the chance to pick up a language and am really unsure which i would find most useful, if any.

    thanx
    Okay think about this....practically everyone is taught some French at school, so that wouldn't make you unique. Spanish is becoming very popular for GCSE/A-levels as people love to holiday there, again meaning that more people will have this language under their belt.
    Germany on the other hand has the biggest economy in the EU (doing badly right now...granted..but still....) and doesn't seem all that popular at A/level or GCSE etc.
    So personally I would plump for that. Clearly city jobs will be dealing with Germany, and also Switzerland (tho you can have french for this) and you will be very attractive with the language. Although Spanish is more widely spoken, it is spoken by less 'wealthy' countries, although city firms will still be doing business with them I imagine, but maybe not as much.
    Actually I would say both spanish and german are pretty good...I stil reckon more people in the country speak spanish than German because of the whole Brits holdaying in Spain thing. You want to be as employable as you can to these city firms.

    Does depend on what sector you want to go in though, for example french would be realllly useful if the firm you work for is doing stuff with/for other firms in say Canada. Do you know any langauges at the mo,?
    The more languages the more employable you'll be!!!
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    Okay think about this....practically everyone is taught some French at school, so that wouldn't make you unique. Spanish is becoming very popular for GCSE/A-levels as people love to holiday there, again meaning that more people will have this language under their belt.
    Germany on the other hand has the biggest economy in the EU (doing badly right now...granted..but still....) and doesn't seem all that popular at A/level or GCSE etc.
    So personally I would plump for that. Clearly city jobs will be dealing with Germany, and also Switzerland (tho you can have french for this) and you will be very attractive with the language. Although Spanish is more widely spoken, it is spoken by less 'wealthy' countries, although city firms will still be doing business with them I imagine, but maybe not as much.
    Actually I would say both spanish and german are pretty good...I stil reckon more people in the country speak spanish than German because of the whole Brits holdaying in Spain thing. You want to be as employable as you can to these city firms.

    Does depend on what sector you want to go in though, for example french would be realllly useful if the firm you work for is doing stuff with/for other firms in say Canada. Do you know any langauges at the mo,?
    The more languages the more employable you'll be!!!
    Sorry if you don't mind my saying so but that is total bullsh*t. Yes german is a language that is clearly less spoken but then, you might as well suggest learning chinese seeing as it is relatively unspoken amongst english people. Speaking any language (that is a lingua franca) fluently is going to get you very far in life. Just because people learn how to say 'bonjour' in GCSE french (which is about as high as the national standard is) doesn't mean that everyone is fluent in it. So word of advice to prada_princess - pick any language that is a lingua franca. Obviously the more the better. But if you can manage to pick up chinese on the way then power to you!
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    (Original post by adrian)
    Sorry if you don't mind my saying so but that is total bullsh*t. Yes german is a language that is clearly less spoken but then, you might as well suggest learning chinese seeing as it is relatively unspoken amongst english people. Speaking any language (that is a lingua franca) fluently is going to get you very far in life. Just because people learn how to say 'bonjour' in GCSE french (which is about as high as the national standard is) doesn't mean that everyone is fluent in it. So word of advice to prada_princess - pick any language that is a lingua franca. Obviously the more the better. But if you can manage to pick up chinese on the way then power to you!
    Please use your brain before you post . You've missed the point of the post by the post starter completely. This person wants to work in a city firm, therefore it is generally a competitive enviroment. If she wants to get into a city firm with good career prospects she wants to be as employable as possible. By choosing a language that is probably going to be useful to most city firms, and that is spoken by a smaller proportion of people compared to other languages, she will certainly be more employable. Our companies do ALOT of trade with Europe, you have to remember that, so people with European languages, especially one that belongs to the largest economy in Europe and spoken by not that many people are clearly going to be an "asset" to that company. Can't believe I had to spell it out for you!
    By the way when did I say being able to say "bonjour" is going to make you fluent? one would hope that if you're getting A* at a GCSE language you are decent in the subject, and so can develop this by going to other countries where the language is spoken and utilize this. Also if you're getting a high A* at GCSE it's likely you may carry this onto AS, and possibly even A2. I would expect someone to be fluent at a language after A2 (providing they have a decent grade ie A/B), wouldn't you?
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    As the future dominant economy - Chinese is the language to learn.
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    I'd be inclined to say Swahili or Afrikaans. Imagine the employer roaming through piles of applications for a job and then it stares at him: GCSE Maori That will make you stand out...
    *winks and laughs, imagining the face of the employer after reading about someone with a GCSE in Maori*
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    Please use your brain before you post . You've missed the point of the post by the post starter completely. This person wants to work in a city firm, therefore it is generally a competitive enviroment. If she wants to get into a city firm with good career prospects she wants to be as employable as possible. By choosing a language that is probably going to be useful to most city firms, and that is spoken by a smaller proportion of people compared to other languages, she will certainly be more employable. Our companies do ALOT of trade with Europe, you have to remember that, so people with European languages, especially one that belongs to the largest economy in Europe and spoken by not that many people are clearly going to be an "asset" to that company. Can't believe I had to spell it out for you!
    By the way when did I say being able to say "bonjour" is going to make you fluent? one would hope that if you're getting A* at a GCSE language you are decent in the subject, and so can develop this by going to other countries where the language is spoken and utilize this. Also if you're getting a high A* at GCSE it's likely you may carry this onto AS, and possibly even A2. I would expect someone to be fluent at a language after A2 (providing they have a decent grade ie A/B), wouldn't you?
    employer's don't really care about GCSEs, they were done a long time before you'd be applying for a job

    just study the one that most appeals to you and forget about trying to impress employers for now by choosing one you think may appeal to them - you'd probably have to do it to A-level standard and have been abroad for a bit for them to take you seriously though, they're not just going to employ someone with an A* at GCSE

    don't forget that language skills are going to be secondary as anyone can learn a language - you'll need the skills relevant to the job you are going for, if you even know what you're going for that is - you're not going to be paid very well just to speak german on the phone
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    Most graduates don't even bother listing the individual GCSEs they got on their CVs.
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    (Original post by marabara)
    employer's don't really care about GCSEs, they were done a long time before you'd be applying for a job

    just study the one that most appeals to you and forget about trying to impress employers for now by choosing one you think may appeal to them - you'd probably have to do it to A-level standard and have been abroad for a bit for them to take you seriously though, they're not just going to employ someone with an A* at GCSE

    don't forget that language skills are going to be secondary as anyone can learn a language - you'll need the skills relevant to the job you are going for, if you even know what you're going for that is - you're not going to be paid very well just to speak german on the phone
    The post starter(if you read the post), is asking for advice on what languages would make her most employable. I think people forget to think these things through properly and should get over the GCSE thing as soon as they see it. I didn't say they were going to suddenly employ you with an A* in a language, that wasn't the point, but you'vr decided to jump on it as that's all you can think of to say??? Think about it....if she/he is doing very well in a language(yes at GCSE!) and then continues it for A-level, becomes very fluent at it etc, it might be more likely to get her that interview and if they're especially looking for mulitlingual types, which city firms often do, then she might be in with a shot. The point is the GCSE may set the foundations, from which on can rise higher.....I am all for learning the basics of a language even if you don't follow it up now, you may become interested in it again in the future, and to have the foundations is certainly useful.

    Your latter paragraph is irrelevant as it sounds like she is "picking up" a language, which would suggest that she is following some type of other course. As it is, many firms do employ interpreters amongst other things like business consultants which do alot more than "just speak german on the phone".

    As for what language you should learn...I stick with my other posts, if you're learning the languages to help with employability. Of course it should be for fun too....but I don't see why most languages can't be fun, whichever it is.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    Most graduates don't even bother listing the individual GCSEs they got on their CVs.
    Well if you have a good degree then probably not!
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    Most graduates don't even bother listing the individual GCSEs they got on their CVs.
    Thats expected. The A levels subsides the GCSEs, and the degree subsides the A levels.

    Its like putting in that you won the 100m breaststroke in Y5
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    (Original post by 2776)
    Thats expected. The A levels subsides the GCSEs, and the degree subsides the A levels.

    Its like putting in that you won the 100m breaststroke in Y5
    Phil, you're going to be a doctor when you are older. I can call you Doctor 2776!
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    Please use your brain before you post . You've missed the point of the post by the post starter completely. This person wants to work in a city firm, therefore it is generally a competitive enviroment. If she wants to get into a city firm with good career prospects she wants to be as employable as possible. By choosing a language that is probably going to be useful to most city firms, and that is spoken by a smaller proportion of people compared to other languages, she will certainly be more employable. Our companies do ALOT of trade with Europe, you have to remember that, so people with European languages, especially one that belongs to the largest economy in Europe and spoken by not that many people are clearly going to be an "asset" to that company.
    most big German firms insist on english-speaking Germans. multi-national companies will use english as a working language and hire Germans who can speak english fluently. speaking a language such as French would make you employable if none of the German employees can.

    Can't believe I had to spell it out for you!
    By the way when did I say being able to say "bonjour" is going to make you fluent? one would hope that if you're getting A* at a GCSE language you are decent in the subject, and so can develop this by going to other countries where the language is spoken and utilize this. Also if you're getting a high A* at GCSE it's likely you may carry this onto AS, and possibly even A2. I would expect someone to be fluent at a language after A2 (providing they have a decent grade ie A/B), wouldn't you?
    hehe, are you kidding? i work in France and if you think a GCSE or even A-level student is remotely fluent then you are terribly mistaken. most French employees have a good grasp of English, but you are far more likely to need French in a French environment than German in a German environment.

    in reply to the initial poster, if you intend to remain in the UK and have prospective employers in mind, search their vacancies and see what they are looking for. personally its hard to make a generalisation, but i would remain with something like French or German(depending on where you strength lies) rather than something like Italian.
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    Note: I got a grade A in French GCSE and I can safely say that:

    - I did hardly any work in the subject
    - Very little revision.
    - Hated it completely.
    - Couldn't speak it whatsoever; not even "unfluently".
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    (Original post by prada_princess)
    What foreign language would you guys consider to be most useful if you were hopin for a job in the city (eventually)?

    May seem like a silly question, only im havin the chance to pick up a language and am really unsure which i would find most useful, if any.

    thanx
    depends - if you work in Deutsche Bank or something, obviously german would be useful in dealing with german customers but if you work in london - you dont need to learn a specific foreign language in most positions
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    (Original post by prada_princess)
    What foreign language would you guys consider to be most useful if you were hopin for a job in the city (eventually)?

    May seem like a silly question, only im havin the chance to pick up a language and am really unsure which i would find most useful, if any.

    thanx

    without any hesitation. CHINESE

    China's growth rate is about 10% a year where as Britain is about 3%
    They'll soon catch up.

    I am actually taking a Gap Year to learn Chinese !
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    (Original post by illumintai)
    without any hesitation. CHINESE

    China's growth rate is about 10% a year where as Britain is about 3%
    They'll soon catch up.

    I am actually taking a Gap Year to learn Chinese !
    Definately - all Western companies want a foot in China now.
 
 
 
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