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[POLL] Check your privilege Watch

  • View Poll Results: How privileged are you?
    Very disprivileged (less than -100)
    13.25%
    Non-privileged (-100 - 0)
    23.49%
    Above average (1 - 50)
    22.89%
    Privileged (51 - 100)
    13.86%
    CHECK IT DAILY (over 100)
    26.51%

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    135 but it's clearly BS.
    How is being gay or a woman a disadvantage at all...
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    (Original post by ed-)
    135 but it's clearly BS.
    How is being gay or a woman a disadvantage at all...
    Well some countries ban gays and other countries don't approve of women's rights.
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    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by kevin6767)
    and hope not to wake up next to Shrek in the morning.
    Shrek is love, Shrek is life
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    Well some countries ban gays and other countries don't approve of women's rights.
    Is the UK those countries?
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    I got 110, although for income I used my household income (I have none of my own), and for career I used my career aspiration (scientist). I know I'm privileged, but that puts me in a better position to bring down the system from within
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    -10, winning...or not.
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    (Original post by ed-)
    135 but it's clearly BS.
    How is being gay or a woman a disadvantage at all...
    lol

    See, the people with high scores are the ones who are going to think there's no disadvantage. Funny how that works.
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    (Original post by Chaoshi)
    lol

    See, the people with high scores are the ones who are going to think there's no disadvantage. Funny how that works.
    So explain to me how gays, women and racial minorities are disadvantaged in todays society?
    Absolute BS.
    Some people will use any perceived disadvantage to their advantage.
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    (Original post by ed-)
    Some people will use any perceived disadvantage to their advantage.
    wat
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    (Original post by dendodge)
    I got 110, although for income I used my household income (I have none of my own), and for career I used my career aspiration (scientist). I know I'm privileged, but that puts me in a better position to bring down the system from within
    There's something wrong with the system because some people are more disadvantaged than others?
    People in the UK who say they're disadvantaged should really look at the third world to put it into perspective :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    wat
    It's easy to pass off failures as being a result of 'disadvantages' when actually they're just a result of personal shortcomings. Does being gay, black or a woman mean you're less likely to get good grades? No. But it's easy to use those things as excuses for when you don't get those 3 As.
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    (Original post by ed-)
    It's easy to pass off failures as being a result of 'disadvantages' when actually they're just a result of personal shortcomings. Does being gay, black or a woman mean you're less likely to get good grades? No. But it's easy to use those things as excuses for when you don't get those 3 As.
    I don't think anyone has ever used any of those things to explain their failure to attain 3 As
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    (Original post by ed-)
    So explain to me how gays, women and racial minorities are disadvantaged in todays society?
    Absolute BS.
    Some people will use any perceived disadvantage to their advantage.
    The Male Privilege Checklist
    1. My odds of being hired for a job, when competing against female applicants, are probably skewed in my favor. The more prestigious the job, the larger the odds are skewed.
    2. I can be confident that my co-workers won’t think I got my job because of my sex – even though that might be true. (More).
    3. If I am never promoted, it’s not because of my sex.
    4. If I fail in my job or career, I can feel sure this won’t be seen as a black mark against my entire sex’s capabilities.
    5. I am far less likely to face sexual harassment at work than my female co-workers are. (More).
    6. If I do the same task as a woman, and if the measurement is at all subjective, chances are people will think I did a better job.
    7. If I’m a teen or adult, and if I can stay out of prison, my odds of being raped are relatively low. (More).
    8. On average, I am taught to fear walking alone after dark in average public spaces much less than my female counterparts are.
    9. If I choose not to have children, my masculinity will not be called into question.
    10. If I have children but do not provide primary care for them, my masculinity will not be called into question.
    11. If I have children and provide primary care for them, I’ll be praised for extraordinary parenting if I’m even marginally competent. (More).
    12. If I have children and a career, no one will think I’m selfish for not staying at home.
    13. If I seek political office, my relationship with my children, or who I hire to take care of them, will probably not be scrutinized by the press.
    14. My elected representatives are mostly people of my own sex. The more prestigious and powerful the elected position, the more this is true.
    15. When I ask to see “the person in charge,” odds are I will face a person of my own sex. The higher-up in the organization the person is, the surer I can be.
    16. As a child, chances are I was encouraged to be more active and outgoing than my sisters. (More).
    17. As a child, I could choose from an almost infinite variety of children’s media featuring positive, active, non-stereotyped heroes of my own sex. I never had to look for it; male protagonists were (and are) the default.
    18. As a child, chances are I got more teacher attention than girls who raised their hands just as often. (More).
    19. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether or not it has sexist overtones.
    20. I can turn on the television or glance at the front page of the newspaper and see people of my own sex widely represented.
    21. If I’m careless with my financial affairs it won’t be attributed to my sex.
    22. If I’m careless with my driving it won’t be attributed to my sex.
    23. I can speak in public to a large group without putting my sex on trial.
    24. Even if I sleep with a lot of women, there is no chance that I will be seriously labeled a “slut,” nor is there any male counterpart to “slut-bashing.” (More).
    25. I do not have to worry about the message my wardrobe sends about my sexual availability. (More).
    26. My clothing is typically less expensive and better-constructed than women’s clothing for the same social status. While I have fewer options, my clothes will probably fit better than a woman’s without tailoring. (More).
    27. The grooming regimen expected of me is relatively cheap and consumes little time. (More).
    28. If I buy a new car, chances are I’ll be offered a better price than a woman buying the same car. (More).
    29. If I’m not conventionally attractive, the disadvantages are relatively small and easy to ignore.
    30. I can be loud with no fear of being called a shrew. I can be aggressive with no fear of being called a *****.
    31. I can ask for legal protection from violence that happens mostly to men without being seen as a selfish special interest, since that kind of violence is called “crime” and is a general social concern. (Violence that happens mostly to women is usually called “domestic violence” or “acquaintance rape,” and is seen as a special interest issue.)
    32. I can be confident that the ordinary language of day-to-day existence will always include my sex. “All men are created equal,” mailman, chairman, freshman, he.
    33. My ability to make important decisions and my capability in general will never be questioned depending on what time of the month it is.
    34. I will never be expected to change my name upon marriage or questioned if I don’t change my name.
    35. The decision to hire me will not be based on assumptions about whether or not I might choose to have a family sometime soon.
    36. Every major religion in the world is led primarily by people of my own sex. Even God, in most major religions, is pictured as male.
    37. Most major religions argue that I should be the head of my household, while my wife and children should be subservient to me.
    38. If I have a wife or live-in girlfriend, chances are we’ll divide up household chores so that she does most of the labor, and in particular the most repetitive and unrewarding tasks. (More).
    39. If I have children with my girlfriend or wife, I can expect her to do most of the basic childcare such as changing diapers and feeding.
    40. If I have children with my wife or girlfriend, and it turns out that one of us needs to make career sacrifices to raise the kids, chances are we’ll both assume the career sacrificed should be hers.
    41. Assuming I am heterosexual, magazines, billboards, television, movies, pornography, and virtually all of media is filled with images of scantily-clad women intended to appeal to me sexually. Such images of men exist, but are rarer.
    42. In general, I am under much less pressure to be thin than my female counterparts are. (More). If I am fat, I probably suffer fewer social and economic consequences for being fat than fat women do. (More).
    43. If I am heterosexual, it’s incredibly unlikely that I’ll ever be beaten up by a spouse or lover. (More).
    44. Complete strangers generally do not walk up to me on the street and tell me to “smile.” (More: 1 2).
    45. Sexual harassment on the street virtually never happens to me. I do not need to plot my movements through public space in order to avoid being sexually harassed, or to mitigate sexual harassment. (More.)
    45. On average, I am not interrupted by women as often as women are interrupted by men.
    46. I have the privilege of being unaware of my male privilege.



    The White Privilege Checklist
    1. I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.
    2. I can avoid spending time with people whom I was trained to mistrust and who have learned to mistrust my kind or me.
    3. If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford and in which I would want to live.
    4. I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.
    5. I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.
    6. I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented.
    7. When I am told about our national heritage or about "civilization," I am shown that people of my color made it what it is.
    8. I can be sure that my children will be given curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race.
    9. If I want to, I can be pretty sure of finding a publisher for this piece on white privilege.
    10. I can be pretty sure of having my voice heard in a group in which I am the only member of my race.
    11. I can be casual about whether or not to listen to another person's voice in a group in which s/he is the only member of his/her race.
    12. I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my cultural traditions, into a hairdresser's shop and find someone who can cut my hair.
    13. Whether I use checks, credit cards or cash, I can count on my skin color not to work against the appearance of financial reliability.
    14. I can arrange to protect my children most of the time from people who might not like them.
    15. I do not have to educate my children to be aware of systemic racism for their own daily physical protection.
    16. I can be pretty sure that my children's teachers and employers will tolerate them if they fit school and workplace norms; my chief worries about them do not concern others' attitudes toward their race.
    17. I can talk with my mouth full and not have people put this down to my color.
    18. I can swear, or dress in second hand clothes, or not answer letters, without having people attribute these choices to the bad morals, the poverty or the illiteracy of my race.
    19. I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial.
    20. I can do well in a challenging situation without being called a credit to my race.
    21. I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.
    22. I can remain oblivious of the language and customs of persons of color who constitute the world's majority without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion.
    23. I can criticize our government and talk about how much I fear its policies and behavior without being seen as a cultural outsider.
    24. I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the "person in charge", I will be facing a person of my race.
    25. If a traffic cop pulls me over or if the IRS audits my tax return, I can be sure I haven't been singled out because of my race.
    26. I can easily buy posters, post-cards, picture books, greeting cards, dolls, toys and children's magazines featuring people of my race.
    27. I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance or feared.
    28. I can be pretty sure that an argument with a colleague of another race is more likely to jeopardize her/his chances for advancement than to jeopardize mine.
    29. I can be pretty sure that if I argue for the promotion of a person of another race, or a program centering on race, this is not likely to cost me heavily within my present setting, even if my colleagues disagree with me.
    30. If I declare there is a racial issue at hand, or there isn't a racial issue at hand, my race will lend me more credibility for either position than a person of color will have.
    31. I can choose to ignore developments in minority writing and minority activist programs, or disparage them, or learn from them, but in any case, I can find ways to be more or less protected from negative consequences of any of these choices.
    32. My culture gives me little fear about ignoring the perspectives and powers of people of other races.
    33. I am not made acutely aware that my shape, bearing or body odor will be taken as a reflection on my race.
    34. I can worry about racism without being seen as self-interested or self-seeking.
    35. I can take a job with an affirmative action employer without having my co-workers on the job suspect that I got it because of my race.
    36. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether it had racial overtones.
    37. I can be pretty sure of finding people who would be willing to talk with me and advise me about my next steps, professionally.
    38. I can think over many options, social, political, imaginative or professional, without asking whether a person of my race would be accepted or allowed to do what I want to do.
    39. I can be late to a meeting without having the lateness reflect on my race.
    40. I can choose public accommodation without fearing that people of my race cannot get in or will be mistreated in the places I have chosen.
    41. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help, my race will not work against me.
    42. I can arrange my activities so that I will never have to experience feelings of rejection owing to my race.
    43. If I have low credibility as a leader I can be sure that my race is not the problem.
    44. I can easily find academic courses and institutions which give attention only to people of my race.
    45. I can expect figurative language and imagery in all of the arts to testify to experiences of my race.
    46. I can chose blemish cover or bandages in "flesh" color and have them more or less match my skin.
    47. I can travel alone or with my spouse without expecting embarrassment or hostility in those who deal with us.
    48. I have no difficulty finding neighborhoods where people approve of our household.
    49. My children are given texts and classes which implicitly support our kind of family unit and do not turn them against my choice of domestic partnership.
    50. I will feel welcomed and "normal" in the usual walks of public life, institutional and social.


    The Heterosexual Privilege Checklist

      1. I can be pretty sure that my roomate, hallmates and classmates will be comfortable with whomever I chose to date.
      2. If I pick up a magazine, watch TV, or play music, I can be certain relationships similar to mine will be represented.
      3. When I talk about my heterosexuality (such as in a joke or talking about my relationships), I will not be accused of pushing my agenda or lifestyle onto others.
      4. I do not have to fear that if my family or friends find out about my identity there will be economic, emotional, physical or psychological consequences.
      5. I did not grow up with games that attack my sexual orientation (IE f*g tag or smear the queer).
      6. I am not accused of being abused, warped or psychologically confused because of my sexual orientation.
      7. I can go home from most meetings, classes, and conversations without feeling excluded, fearful, attacked, isolated, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance, stereotyped or feared because of my sexual orientation.
      8. I am never asked to speak for everyone who is heterosexual.
      9. I can be sure that my classes will require curricular materials that testify to the existence of people with my sexual orientation.
      10. People don’t ask why I made my choice of sexual orientation.
      11. People don’t ask why I made my choice to be public about my sexual orientation.
      12. I do not have to fear revealing my sexual orientation to friends or family. It’s assumed.
      13. My sexual orientation was never associated with a closet.
      14. People of my gender do not try to convince me to change my sexual orientation.
      15. I don’t have to defend my heterosexuality.
      16. I can easily find a religious community that will not exclude me for being heterosexual.
      17. I can count on finding a therapist or doctor willing and able to talk about my sexuality.
      18. I am guaranteed to find sex education literature for couples with my sexual orientation.
      19. Because of my sexual orientation, I do not need to worry that people will harass me.
      20. I have no need to qualify my straight identity.
      21. My masculinity/femininity is not challenged because of my sexual orientation.
      22. I am not identified by my sexual orientation.
      23. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help my sexual orientation will not work against me.
      24. If my day, week, or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether it has sexual orientation overtones.
      25. Whether I rent or I go to a theater, Blockbuster, an EFS or TOFS movie, I can be sure I will not have trouble finding my sexual orientation represented.
      26. I am guaranteed to find people of my sexual orientation represented in my workplace.
      27. I can walk in public with my significant other and not have people double-take or stare.
      28. I can choose to not think politically about my sexual orientation.
      29. I do not have to worry about telling my roommate about my sexuality. It is assumed I am a heterosexual.
      30. I can remain oblivious of the language and culture of LGBTQ folk without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion.
      31. I can go for months without being called straight.
      32. I’m not grouped because of my sexual orientation.
      33. My individual behavior does not reflect on people who identity as heterosexual.
      34. In everyday conversation, the language my friends and I use generally assumes my sexual orientation. For example, sex inappropriately referring to only heterosexual sex or family meaning heterosexual relationships with kids.
      35. People do not assume I am experienced in sex (or that I even have it!) merely because of my sexual orientation.
      36. I can kiss a person of the opposite gender on the heart or in the cafeteria without being watched and stared at.
      37. Nobody calls me straight with maliciousness.
      38. People can use terms that describe my sexual orientation and mean positive things (IE “straight as an arrow”, “standing up straight” or “straightened out” ) instead of demeaning terms (IE “ewww, that’s gay” or being “queer” ) .
      39. I am not asked to think about why I am straight.
      40. I can be open about my sexual orientation without worrying about my job.
      41. I don’t have to worry about some politicians trying to pass a law which tells me who I can and can’t marry, including at the national, Constitutional, level.
      42. I know I won’t have any problems marrying the person I love.
      43. I know that there will be no problems, as far as my orientation is concerned, in adopting a child;
      44. I know that I will not be targeted by law enforcement for harassment due to my orientation;
      45. I can be open about my orientation with out worrying about being denied housing;
      46. I can walk down the street with my partner and hold hands and kiss without fear that I or my partner will be attacked and beaten, possibly even killed, because of our orientation.
      47. I know that when I refer to my bf/gf/spouse, people will assume we aren’t together just for sex, but for love , and that our love is as real and legitimate as theirs for their significant others.
      48. People do not automatically assume that I am shallow, weak, silly, on drugs or promiscuous because of my orientation.
      49. People do not automatically assume I do not want children.
      50. I will never be asked to hide my partner until after the grandparents die.
      51. People will not mentally assign me a career (e.g., the str8 versions of florist, party planner, interior decorator, hair dresser, etc., etc.) because of my orientation.
      52. People (advertisers and marketers aside) will not assume I am like everyone else of my orientation and will treat me like an individual human being.
      53. When a family emergency occurs, I am able to hold my partner’s hand while they are in pain.
      54. If my partner dies, I am able to inherit the property we owned together without pentalty of law.
      55. I will never have to explain where my children came from, or who’s children they “really” are.
      56. I will never told that I’m too pretty to be gay.
      57. I will never be asked to “tone it down” to make other people feel more comfortable.
      58. I will never be told that I am “too straight”
      59. I will be able to shop in whatever store I choose without being told, “this section isn’t for you.”
      60. I will never be told that who I am can be beaten or raped out of me.


    But please, tell me more about how hard it is to be a straight, cis, white male! :awesome:
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    I don't think anyone has ever used any of those things to explain their failure to attain 3 As
    Then how are those things worth being minus 'privilege points'?
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    (Original post by ed-)
    Then how are those things worth being minus 'privilege points'?
    Because it's a straight cis white man's world, that is the subtext of the chart
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
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    So many dupe accounts later, I still love and admire you :daydreaming:
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    These can be 'privileges' or 'disadvantages' depending on which society's viewpoint you are generalizing it on.

    For example, I think I'd disagree that Buddhists are underprivileged than Sikhs and that non-religious are underprivileged than Jewish people, if viewed from a Western perspective.

    But anyway....I got -515 :nopity:
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    Because it's a straight cis white man's world, that is the subtext of the chart
    (Original post by Chaoshi)
    x
    Wow, you really know how to use copy /paste eh

    But yeah as I said, perceived disadvantages being used as advantages...
    Most of those things don't put a person at an advantage or disadvantage. They're just petit excuses.
 
 
 
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