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    Hi guys!

    Just a quick question! I'm considering starting a OU course in September, and i know that a degree will take me 3-4 years full time and 6 part-time.

    Does anyone here study full time and work full time also? Is it absolutely impossible? I would like to know, as i have been offered a full time position where i am currently working part-time and was wondering if i could juggle both without running myself into the floor

    Thanks
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    I'm currently studying part-time with the OU while working full time, and that's difficult enough for me.
    I couldn't manage studying any more than I do while working full-time. It's probably doable if you're a very motivated person.
    I'm not.
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    If it's a night job, possible. If not no.
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    I'd say full time job and full time OU are possible. Without running yourself into the ground? Probably not.
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    I did my OU degree full time while working full time too. It was hard, at times really hard but I got through it.


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    My advice to anyone starting OU study and not sure how much they can cope with is always to start off studying part-time. That way, you can get your head round how OU study works, what's involved, and how much effort you personally need to put in. If you then feel like you could cope with full-time, great! You can pick up the pace and take on more modules the next year (or partway through that year, depending on the module). I reckon that's better than starting out at breakneck pace, and maybe finding you can't keep up, or don't get the grades you might have otherwise, and being put off the whole thing.

    Personally, (and working full-time) I find that doing more than one module at a time means having no time to do anything other than work and study; and that I can't give quite so much time to each bit of the study as I could have. (To be fair, when I'm studying one module at a time I don't give quite so much time to each bit of the study as I could have; but there's a difference!) It's possible, but I don't particularly enjoy it.
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    It's possible for some people, but it'll definitely be hard work, and for some people it would just be downright impossible.

    Even if you're pretty confident, I wouldn't recommend jumping straight in with 120 points. I work full time and did 90 points a year for my first 3 years, and I'm doing 60 in my last year (I have 30 points of credit transfer). Multiple level 3s can be really difficult and I would have really struggled if I was doing 90 points of level 3 at the same time...pretty sure my grades would've suffered for it too. Mixing up the levels is great if you can do that with your course (I did levels 1/2 in my first year, just 2 in the second year, 1/3 in the third year and just 3 in my final year).
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    I work 6 and 1/2 days a week, working most of the day and I am studying two modules at the same time!! Saying that I do have some 'free time' during the day...about 3/4 hours in total. I work in a boarding school so do get nice long holidays but saying that I'm yet to have an essay during holiday period!

    I don't find it that hard to be honest. A lot of people say they struggle and get extensions etc but I have never once asked for one. I am 21 years old so I don't have children or other commitments which could make the difference.


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    You can decide once you start your first module, if you can handle a larger workload, try it, if not stick with the part-time hours.

    Stop trying to rush things, a degree indicates a wealth of knowledge in a subject, getting crappy marks and cramming your brain reduces the value of...everything!

    I would suggest starting your first module and see how it goes.
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    [QUOTE=YorkshireWarrior;42193387]Stop trying to rush things, a degree indicates a wealth of knowledge in a subject, getting crappy marks and cramming your brain reduces the value of...everything!/QUOTE]

    Not necessarily. People at brick uni do more than an open uni student. I've been doing two and still getting good marks. And for some people, they don't have the time to do it slowly. Personally I haven't got 6 years to study. I need to finish so I can move on into a career, if not I'm going to be stuck doing jobs I don't really want to do. Doesn't mean I'm learning any less than anyone else. It all depends on how much effort you put in.


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    Is it normal for the OU to recommend such long study hours. I've been told 20 hours a week for 60 credit/year study. Is that right? How do ppl do that if they work full time? I don't think I came close to 20 hours a week when I was at a brick uni studying full time. Is it just suggested or do ppl really work all that much?

    Luckily I'll only have a 4 day working week so should fit it all in ok but it must be tough for a ppl who work 5 days and have kids/other commitments (never mind doing more than 60 credits per year!). How do you make time?

    Also do you only study in term time? Is the 20 hours suggested only for term time? (ie less over 52 weeks).
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    Don't tell everyone but.........I probably do about 2 hours a week per module, then a lot more during TMA week. Honestly, I don't see how anyone could spend 20 hours a week on it. Unless you were really really dedicated, had loads of time and loved to study! I've gotten 80% or more in all my TMAs for one of my courses...so it is possible!


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    I thought they normally said 16 hours a week for 60 credits?

    Anyway; I'm the same as Justbychance - I have lulls in between TMAs, and then do tons when I have something to hand in. So, sometimes I do more than 20 hours a week (hell, I've done that much just this weekend on my EMA), but the average is considerably less. (I'm not advocating that as an approach - I always mean to be all organised and systematic and whatnot; I just never quite do it!)
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    Thank goodness. I'd rather not but historically this is how I work too. Its not ideal but I work well under pressure.
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    I've just finished my BA and did it with a full-time (9-5.30) job, marriage and a first child mid-way through, so it is possible. You will need to be dedicated as there will be times when you want to have a break. Fortunately, I liked all my modules and the subject matter (Business Studies) so didn't find it that tough to apply myself.

    The biggest challenge came during my child's first year with the job and sleepless nights. I vividly remember being too tired to sleep that I ended up reading about business strategy most nights/early mornings. I don't recommend taking your first level 3 module with a newborn

    That said, giving up things I liked (watching football, enjoying the summer, etc) were worth it for the end result and future prospects. Even holidays involved me taking books or PDFs along.

    Overall, I took around 4.5 years as I took the modules non-stop after the first year (upping the credit rate to 80-90 per year on average) but much depends on how the course dates fall for your degree. Usually, I'd study around 2 hours per day and maybe a bit more at the weekend which more-or-less meant 16 hours. During the week I'd study from 6am-8am before work.

    I've just had my final module result and am pleased all the effort and sacrifice was worth a First and a wealth of new opportunities. As others suggested, start off moderately and see how you feel.
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    (Original post by metalogic)
    I've just finished my BA and did it with a full-time (9-5.30) job, marriage and a first child mid-way through, so it is possible. You will need to be dedicated as there will be times when you want to have a break. Fortunately, I liked all my modules and the subject matter (Business Studies) so didn't find it that tough to apply myself.

    The biggest challenge came during my child's first year with the job and sleepless nights. I vividly remember being too tired to sleep that I ended up reading about business strategy most nights/early mornings. I don't recommend taking your first level 3 module with a newborn

    That said, giving up things I liked (watching football, enjoying the summer, etc) were worth it for the end result and future prospects. Even holidays involved me taking books or PDFs along.

    Overall, I took around 4.5 years as I took the modules non-stop after the first year (upping the credit rate to 80-90 per year on average) but much depends on how the course dates fall for your degree. Usually, I'd study around 2 hours per day and maybe a bit more at the weekend which more-or-less meant 16 hours. During the week I'd study from 6am-8am before work.

    I've just had my final module result and am pleased all the effort and sacrifice was worth a First and a wealth of new opportunities. As others suggested, start off moderately and see how you feel.
    So you managed to get a first doing all that at the same time ?

    Congratulations! Really well done. You should really be proud of yourself
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    I have been doing 90 credits while in college and I've found it ok, at points it I was against it, but I love doing it! I have also decided to go full-time for a year and see how it goes because I am enjoying it so much, but I think I will continue things like my music lessons, volunteering etc as study is so flexible. I am thinking about looking for a part time (12 hours?) job aswell. I'm certainly looking forward to going full time
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    (Original post by ukbod)
    So you managed to get a first doing all that at the same time ? Congratulations! Really well done. You should really be proud of yourself
    Thank you. In a perverse way I kind of miss it now. I'm all set to for another onslaught come September when I start a PGCE so it's aided a career change (not with the OU as they don't offer it for my subject).

    (Original post by HJ M)
    I have been doing 90 credits while in college and I've found it ok, at points it I was against it, but I love doing it! I have also decided to go full-time for a year and see how it goes because I am enjoying it so much, but I think I will continue things like my music lessons, volunteering etc as study is so flexible. I am thinking about looking for a part time (12 hours?) job aswell. I'm certainly looking forward to going full time
    If you love studying it goes a long way. There's pressure points as you say but at least it makes us organised and is rewarding.

    If you've got the time and like to study full-time sounds good
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    I am doing 120 credits and also volunteering full time. It is tough at times. If you want to talk, drop me a PM
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    I work 40hrs a week and will start my first 60 credit module in October 13. Then in Feb my 30 credit will be added whilst doing my previous one. Do you think that is too much as a starters???
 
 
 
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