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    I am currently doing French, German, English and Maths at A-level. I would like to study French plus a new language ab initio in Germany. If I were to go abroad for uni, I plan to take a year out after sixth form to spend in Germany and get my language up to scratch for a course taught in German. Any recommendations as to good universities for modern languages in Germany?
    Thanks, Voyageuse
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    Depends a lot. Are you more interested in literature, culture or linguistics? Which other language would you want to study? In Germany there are many different kind of degrees involving languages, for example Romanistik (study of the Romance Languages like French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese etc.), Linguistik etc.

    LMU München and Heidelberg are among the best German universities overall and supposed to be strong for languages
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    In Germany, people chose the city/town they want to study in rather than the university. This is why FU Berlin and Humboldt Uni Berlin usually have the highest admission requirements but that does not neccessarily make them better than LMU or Heidelberg in terms of reputtion or teaching quality but on the other hand they are not worse by any means.

    So, I guess you will just have to decide where you want to live. Heidelberg is rather small and thus has lots of the positive aspects of a small city but also the negative ones. Berlin is by far the biggest city in Germany and has a huge variety of clubs, bars etc. Also, there are lots of english speaking people around. I cant say much about Munich apart from the fact that I dont like it because it tries to be a world city but actually is a large village.
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    Hello! My language interests are as follows: I definitely want to study French (either under "Romanistik" or on its own). Combined with this I want to study a second foreign language and, crucially, be able to speak it fluently by the end of the degree. For that reason, I've ruled out Chinese/Japanese etc. as I think these are a bit ambitious to do as a combined degree. I'm very interested in Skandinavistik, or possibly Spanish.

    The university courses I have looked at so far are:
    LMU - Romanistik (120 ects) + Skandinavistik (60 ects)
    Humboldt Uni Berlin - Skandinavistik als Kernfach + Franzoesisch als Beifach
    Heidelberg - French (50%) + Spanish (50%)

    Has anyone any experience of studying at any of these unis? I was also wondering what level of fluency I could expect to reach if I was studying an ab initio language as a Beifach (60 ects)

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Voyageuse)
    Has anyone any experience of studying at any of these unis? I was also wondering what level of fluency I could expect to reach if I was studying an ab initio language as a Beifach (60 ects)
    Can't help you on the experience (have a friend studying Economics at Heidelberg and one studying Law at LMU), but the level of fluency depends hugely on you. You can either study a language at university because you have to and only do what's necessary or you can (and should) go beyond that, read - let's say Spanish - newspapers, watch Spanish television, spend a semester abroad in Spain or France, go on holidays.
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Can't help you on the experience (have a friend studying Economics at Heidelberg and one studying Law at LMU), but the level of fluency depends hugely on you. You can either study a language at university because you have to and only do what's necessary or you can (and should) go beyond that, read - let's say Spanish - newspapers, watch Spanish television, spend a semester abroad in Spain or France, go on holidays.
    I'd definitely give my all to any languages I study. I find learning a language so exciting so I'd take every opportunity to immerse myself in it. I'm currently at sixth form in England - my German's pretty good but I plan to spend a year abroad in Germany before uni to perfect it. During this year, I'd certainly get to grips with the basics of the ab initio language before I begin a degree. Given this, do you think it would be realistic to be fluent in an ab initio (Beifach) language by the end of my degree?

    Thanks so much for the help!
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    (Original post by Voyageuse)
    I'd definitely give my all to any languages I study. I find learning a language so exciting so I'd take every opportunity to immerse myself in it. I'm currently at sixth form in England - my German's pretty good but I plan to spend a year abroad in Germany before uni to perfect it. During this year, I'd certainly get to grips with the basics of the ab initio language before I begin a degree. Given this, do you think it would be realistic to be fluent in an ab initio (Beifach) language by the end of my degree?

    Thanks so much for the help!
    There is French Philology (90) and Spanish without proir knowledge (60) at FU Berlin, if you are interested in philology.

    I dont know whether you will be absolutely fluent within one year but if you want to learn Spanish your chances are probably much higher than if you want to do Scandinavian languges due to your prior knowledge in French.
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    There are reviews of Humboldt and Heidelberg at Uni in the USA, as well as an overview of German education here. Don't know if these help you with the decision. Good luck!
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    (Original post by John Wallis)
    There are reviews of Humboldt and Heidelberg at Uni in the USA, as well as an overview of German education here. Don't know if these help you with the decision. Good luck!
    Thanks John Wallis - this link is really useful and cleared up some queries I had! Has anyone had any experience of Humboldt Uni Berlin? I think that's the one I'm leaning towards...
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    Hello again! So I've been looking into German language courses in Berlin which I could take during my year out before starting at a German university. Humboldt doesn't have a suitable course. Does anyone know of any god courses? I would like to be in Berlin and to take part in a course of at least three months, preferably with an emphasis on academic study and the language skills needed for this. Also, it would be handy if the course offered a DSF or equivalent certificate at the end as this is the proof of language proficiency the university requires for admission. Thanks!
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    (Original post by Voyageuse)
    Hello again! So I've been looking into German language courses in Berlin which I could take during my year out before starting at a German university. Humboldt doesn't have a suitable course. Does anyone know of any god courses? I would like to be in Berlin and to take part in a course of at least three months, preferably with an emphasis on academic study and the language skills needed for this. Also, it would be handy if the course offered a DSF or equivalent certificate at the end as this is the proof of language proficiency the university requires for admission. Thanks!
    Have you thought about going to school for a year? You could enroll as a normal pupil at a German gymnasium. You wouldn't be able to do Abitur because it's a 2 year course, but you'd learn loads. I took a year out between year 11 and year 12 to have a year abroad at a German school and it was a really good experience and I was pretty fluent by the end of it (and I only had a GCSE when I moved there). Feel free to pm me if you want to know more about it.
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    (Original post by Moook)
    Have you thought about going to school for a year? You could enroll as a normal pupil at a German gymnasium. You wouldn't be able to do Abitur because it's a 2 year course, but you'd learn loads. I took a year out between year 11 and year 12 to have a year abroad at a German school and it was a really good experience and I was pretty fluent by the end of it (and I only had a GCSE when I moved there). Feel free to pm me if you want to know more about it.
    Thank you for this - that's definitely something to think about. What did you study whilst you were in Germany, if you don't mind me asking? Was the school accommodating?
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    (Original post by Voyageuse)
    Thank you for this - that's definitely something to think about. What did you study whilst you were in Germany, if you don't mind me asking? Was the school accommodating?
    At school I just joined the normal year 11 (German year 11 is for 16/17 year olds so corresponds to English year 12) classes for most things. I think you have to do German, maths, 2 or possibly 3 sciences, English, French / Latin / beginners Spanish, history and another humanities. The school were really helpful. They found me a host family to live with, helped me do the forms you have to fill in to register in a new town in Germany and were generally lovely. Instead of taking English classes I went to the English class for year 9 and helped out as a language assistant.

    Does your school have an exchange with a German school? or do any German students go to your school for year 12? It's very common for German children to have a year out in year 12 to go to the UK or USA to improve their English.
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    (Original post by Moook)
    At school I just joined the normal year 11 (German year 11 is for 16/17 year olds so corresponds to English year 12) classes for most things. I think you have to do German, maths, 2 or possibly 3 sciences, English, French / Latin / beginners Spanish, history and another humanities. The school were really helpful. They found me a host family to live with, helped me do the forms you have to fill in to register in a new town in Germany and were generally lovely. Instead of taking English classes I went to the English class for year 9 and helped out as a language assistant.

    Does your school have an exchange with a German school? or do any German students go to your school for year 12? It's very common for German children to have a year out in year 12 to go to the UK or USA to improve their English.
    Which German school id you go to? (Again, don't say if you'd rather not!)
 
 
 
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