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    I'm convinced I should pursue a Masters degree.

    I'm 21 now.

    What age were you?

    What would be the ideal age?
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    I suppose it would depend on the subject area.

    I feel that those who study such subjects as art or theatre/performance, or even music, would benefit from not going into a master straight away, but instead have some time to independently develop themselves in the real world, outside of universities and academic structure. There is a developmental arch that people need to go through outside of school/uni in order to improve themselves further, and then perhaps take a masters later if they feel they need support to develop particular skills that they have touched upon.

    But for other subjects such as business or law, I guess it would make sense to follow on with a masters either straight away or after a years break. It's a very competitive area I hear. Although there is this common notion that age equates to experience; qualifications and knowledge are still advantageous, and I wouldn't find it unusual for a person to be 21-22 and doing a masters in those kind of subjects, in fact it would make sense to me to do so. But I don't study those subjects, so my opinion may greatly differ from those that do.

    I'm going to be 26 when I do my masters. I took two years out to reflect and do some independent work, and I found it very useful to do so. But other people I knew who did an undergraduate at the same time as me either went straight into a masters or straight into work.

    Overall, I don't think there is an 'ideal' age, per se. It would depend on the competitiveness of the subject area/industry, and whether or not you feel you want to get a masters under your belt before embarking on anything else.

    What subject area will you be studying, if I may ask?
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    I'm convinced I should pursue a Masters degree.

    I'm 21 now.

    What age were you?

    What would be the ideal age?
    I started mine at 22. I don't think there is an ideal age, there are people on my masters in their 30s and above.
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    I haven't started it yet, but I intend to do it immediately after my Bachelor's. Why? Well, I want to get my formal education out of the way when it is convenient. There are a lot of people who do it at an older age, but as a young adult you won't have to worry about looking after a growing family or all the "old people" chores that need doing. You still have a bit of youth to focus purely on the studies and not have the same difficulties as a family person.

    That said, my father has done an MBA and an MSc in the past decade or so. So, he did them in his 40s and 50s. He did that online with Liverpool university, but my degree requires hands-on time, so it would be a lot harder trying to hold down a job and do that.


    It's basically about what's easiest for you. If funding is a problem, give it a few years. However, be aware that age will bring along more responsibilities and perhaps less free time.
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    (Original post by Bouffe)
    I suppose it would depend on the subject area.

    I feel that those who study such subjects as art or theatre/performance, or even music, would benefit from not going into a master straight away, but instead have some time to independently develop themselves in the real world, outside of universities and academic structure. There is a developmental arch that people need to go through outside of school/uni in order to improve themselves further, and then perhaps take a masters later if they feel they need support to develop particular skills that they have touched upon.

    But for other subjects such as business or law, I guess it would make sense to follow on with a masters either straight away or after a years break. It's a very competitive area I hear. Although there is this common notion that age equates to experience; qualifications and knowledge are still advantageous, and I wouldn't find it unusual for a person to be 21-22 and doing a masters in those kind of subjects, in fact it would make sense to me to do so. But I don't study those subjects, so my opinion may greatly differ from those that do.

    I'm going to be 26 when I do my masters. I took two years out to reflect and do some independent work, and I found it very useful to do so. But other people I knew who did an undergraduate at the same time as me either went straight into a masters or straight into work.

    Overall, I don't think there is an 'ideal' age, per se. It would depend on the competitiveness of the subject area/industry, and whether or not you feel you want to get a masters under your belt before embarking on anything else.

    What subject area will you be studying, if I may ask?
    Hi

    I already have a bachelors degree in accounting and finance. So as things stands, I would want to pursue MBA.

    I would hope that when I'll be pursuing my masters l'll fit in with similar minded people. And if I'm being honest, my reason for wanting to pursue masters is not mainly based for my career development but rather experience the kind of lifestyle I had when I was doing my bachelors.

    Right now I'm working in an investment firm. Initially it was a 3 months contract, but my superior has recently told me that they are willing to give me a permanent contract if I wish to continue. So I'm a bit in the dark.

    I'm not really enjoying the duties... But I am certainly capable of executing them...but then again I don't want to be in this place in the long term... But the pay is well above what anyone would get in this capacity...

    So if I do want to pursue masters I want to make sure I'll have a good time there...

    (Original post by redferry)
    I started mine at 22. I don't think there is an ideal age, there are people on my masters in their 30s and above.
    Hi. What are you pursuing?
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    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    I haven't started it yet, but I intend to do it immediately after my Bachelor's. Why? Well, I want to get my formal education out of the way when it is convenient. There are a lot of people who do it at an older age, but as a young adult you won't have to worry about looking after a growing family or all the "old people" chores that need doing. You still have a bit of youth to focus purely on the studies and not have the same difficulties as a family person.

    That said, my father has done an MBA and an MSc in the past decade or so. So, he did them in his 40s and 50s. He did that online with Liverpool university, but my degree requires hands-on time, so it would be a lot harder trying to hold down a job and do that.


    It's basically about what's easiest for you. If funding is a problem, give it a few years. However, be aware that age will bring along more responsibilities and perhaps less free time.
    This, in many ways, was how i pictured it when was doing my bachelors.

    But crossroads came when I got an internship and stuff.
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    This, in many ways, was how i pictured it when was doing my bachelors.

    But crossroads came when I got an internship and stuff.
    Yeah, I am looking to do a placement - Some companies have said on their websites that they will support candidates through their Master's, but others might not.

    If the golden opportunity comes up to work my dream job instead of doing a postgraduate straight away, I'm taking the work.
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    I have started at my 24 and i feel the early the good if we finish-up masters very soon then our brain will be matured and easy to decide our future...and this is the age where we don't have any stress and it will be very easy to complete if not after 26 many relations will come across to spoil out our carrier.
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    Education is a life-long experience. There are Masters students of ALL ages, as there are PhD students.

    Life isnt a race.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Education is a life-long experience. There are Masters students of ALL ages, as there are PhD students.

    Life isnt a race.
    This.

    And there's a reason some courses like people with some experience - it adds real life to academia. I delayed my first masters due to funding reasons and think I ended up getting a lot more value out of it with a few years' work experience which made it all more real and less abstract. Obviously this will vary by subject though.
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    My brother says a lot of people take a year or two out, get some life experience, before studying their masters. Some people take even more. There is no rush.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Education is a life-long experience. There are Masters students of ALL ages, as there are PhD students.

    Life isnt a race.
    I also agree with this.
    If I had the money, I'd probably do a Masters now and I'm 21. I suppose it depends on when you feel ready and when circumstances allow. Some people find it harder to go back into education when they've had a year or more out whereas others feel more ready to handle the pressures etc after having the time out. It all depends on the individual person and, to some extent, the subject. I don't believe there is an ideal age.
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    I'm convinced I should pursue a Masters degree.

    I'm 21 now.

    What age were you?

    What would be the ideal age?
    I am also 21 and I'm in the middle of my Masters at the moment! I turned 21 in May and I started my Masters in the September.
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    (Original post by RedArrow)


    Hi. What are you pursuing?
    Biodiversity and Conservation
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    I'll be 22, my dad was 45, there's a girl in my year who'll be 19 when she starts hers...it depends what suits you as an individual!
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    Think carefully before doing a masters straight after undergrad. I did my masters at 21, before having full time work experience, which meant that I chose an area that I was interested in, but really wasn't suited for as a career. Of course, I didn't find that out until after I had started working with the masters in hand. Five years later, I'm retraining in something completely different.

    Some people do know what they want to do straight away, but I think getting work experience between undergrad and postgrad is extremely valuable and will usually help you in the long run.

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    I think all these views have merit and it really does depend. And though in retrospect I was happy I waited (even if not by choice) I am sure I would still have loved doing a masters straight after undergrad.

    And a few years on, I'm doing another masters later this year, in a subject that interests me and should be good for my career, but not one that it would ever have occurred to me to do while I was in undergrad. So it really is about the time being right for the individual.
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    And if I'm being honest, my reason for wanting to pursue masters is not mainly based for my career development but rather experience the kind of lifestyle I had when I was doing my bachelors.
    I'd maybe rethink that aspect if I were you. A Masters is a very different beast to an undergrad degree and in my experience, my lifestyle was completely different. I turned out the same volume of coursework in a term, that I'd done in my entire third year of undergrad. It was also much more in-depth, analytical and demanding. I worked most evenings and weekends and waved goodbye to my social life for a year. The dissertation months were even more intense.

    Not trying to put you off - I loved my Masters and wouldn't have missed it for the world - but a realistic perspective will make the transition less of a shock.

    (Back on topic for a second - my "ideal age" turned out to be 47!)
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    ...
    I already have a bachelors degree in accounting and finance. So as things stands, I would want to pursue MBA.
    ...
    A MBA is one of the rare programs to be choosed for which you need at least 3-5 years of work experience, especially for the well-known programs. Getting straight into management positions without any work experience is rare and the most known MBA programs profit from the work experience of their students.
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    (Original post by Bouffe)
    I suppose it would depend on the subject area.

    I feel that those who study such subjects as art or theatre/performance, or even music, would benefit from not going into a master straight away, but instead have some time to independently develop themselves in the real world, outside of universities and academic structure. There is a developmental arch that people need to go through outside of school/uni in order to improve themselves further, and then perhaps take a masters later if they feel they need support to develop particular skills that they have touched upon.

    But for other subjects such as business or law, I guess it would make sense to follow on with a masters either straight away or after a years break. It's a very competitive area I hear. Although there is this common notion that age equates to experience; qualifications and knowledge are still advantageous, and I wouldn't find it unusual for a person to be 21-22 and doing a masters in those kind of subjects, in fact it would make sense to me to do so. But I don't study those subjects, so my opinion may greatly differ from those that do.

    I'm going to be 26 when I do my masters. I took two years out to reflect and do some independent work, and I found it very useful to do so. But other people I knew who did an undergraduate at the same time as me either went straight into a masters or straight into work.

    Overall, I don't think there is an 'ideal' age, per se. It would depend on the competitiveness of the subject area/industry, and whether or not you feel you want to get a masters under your belt before embarking on anything else.

    What subject area will you be studying, if I may ask?
    +1

    I think Bouffe hit the nail on the head here.
 
 
 
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