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    Hi Guys

    Hope I've posted in the right place, I'm 19 and currently working full time as a Receptionist and have done for the past 2 years. I feel the job is dead end and I certainly don't want to be stuck in this role for the rest of my life when I know I am capable of much more. I left school with 10 GCSE's at A-C and then completed a Level 2 and Level 3 Business course while working in my current reception job.

    I've been looking into studying nursing at Southampton uni and know it's something I really want to do. However, the requirements are BBB at A level and obviously I have no A Levels at all. I just wanted to know where is the best place to start? I have looked online and it seems the only way to do my A levels is to go back to school and study for 2 years. Is there any other types of schemes or courses which enable me to work for the 3 A Levels I will need in a shorter time scale?

    Any help would really be appreciated, thanks
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    (Original post by fps01)
    Hi Guys

    Hope I've posted in the right place, I'm 19 and currently working full time as a Receptionist and have done for the past 2 years. I feel the job is dead end and I certainly don't want to be stuck in this role for the rest of my life when I know I am capable of much more. I left school with 10 GCSE's at A-C and then completed a Level 2 and Level 3 Business course while working in my current reception job.

    I've been looking into studying nursing at Southampton uni and know it's something I really want to do. However, the requirements are BBB at A level and obviously I have no A Levels at all. I just wanted to know where is the best place to start? I have looked online and it seems the only way to do my A levels is to go back to school and study for 2 years. Is there any other types of schemes or courses which enable me to work for the 3 A Levels I will need in a shorter time scale?

    Any help would really be appreciated, thanks
    You can either complete an Access to HE course, which is just one year and is for students of all ages. Due to your age, you'll have to fund this yourself.

    Alternative you can do what most other students do, and just study A Levels from home. Pick an A Level you want to study, go and buy the AS/A2 books for the course and read them. You can sit examinations as an external candidate by going through AQA (you can do it all on their website). You can sit exams at a local school / college etc, and will be a lot cheaper than going to college to do A Levels, or doing an Access course. Exams are usually £50 each (depends on the exam & the centre etc). This might be more beneficial for you as you can keep your job too, you can then sit all exams in one go if you're ready for it.
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    I would actually be inclined to suggest the complete opposite and say go back to a school/college to take them. If you haven't studied A-levels before then they are quite a shock to the system and a lot of hard work. If you have previous experience then I think it is easier to do them from home. Plus if you want to do subjects with a coursework element you have to do that in a school/college which do the subject and allow external candidates. It can be a bit of a minefield, but the bonus is that with a school/college you are automatically entered in all the exams as you are a student with them. That or do an access course for whatever you want to study.
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    If you want to go into nursing the access course is best, you would be with other mature students and its quicker than a levels. I am on the access course with lots of people going into the health care professions it's a very popular route to lead to nursing and if you look on the university websites it should say how many credits you need to obtain on the access course to get in. Also some colleges offer funding for the course if you are unemployed etc. the access course is hard work with multiple assignments at the same time but I have to say I'm glad I did it instead of going back to study a levels.
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    Check if there are any evening classes locally where you could study for an AS in Biology or Chemistry. This would give you an opportunity to determine if you are ready for study. It will be challenging, but before embarking on an A2 or an access course it will help to make sure it is right for you.

    Volunteer in local hospital to get a feel for nursing. You may find that the aspects of nursing that you find most interesting are only a minor part of the job. You might be better off in another specialism.

    Don't be concerned about your age, you are only 19, from a funding standpoint as long as you start your A levels or a suitable Access course whilst you are under 24, you will be eligible for funding for your first level 3 qualification. If you are over 24 you may end up with a loan to fund an Access course.

    Whilst you may not view your job has a future potential. Make sure that you do your homework and select the right course for you. The way university level funding works, you real only get one opportunity to complete a course in full. The cost of self funding an undergraduate degree is out of reach of most. If you recieve funding for more than one year on the wrong course, you may not have enough funding to complete a standard 3 year course.
 
 
 
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