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    Hi

    I am currently on my gap year and I intend to go back to Univeristy in September to finish my final year in law LLB and I have decided that I would like to continue on to do a PGCE PCET. I have a few questions which would be really helpful if people could help me out.

    1. Is it worth me considering doing a PGCE Citizenship instead of a PGCE PCET? I know Citizenship is compulsory at the moment but over the years there has been so much attempts to take it off the national curriculum I dont feel it would be a secure path to take for job security. Can people give me their on opinions on whether they agree or disagree and why

    2. I am trying to do all I can to secure a PGCE PCET, I hopefully obtain a 2:1 in law but at the worst I would get a 2:2 which it seems, some Universities would still accept. Apart from this I am going to apply to colleges and universities to see if I can get some work experience or shadow a lecturer. Who should I send these letters too? Should I email or send a proper letter and what should I put in it, as I have no idea how to maximise my chances of getting work experience? If so, would it matter what type of lessons it was or would it be better off being law?

    3. Apart from applying to colleges and universities in my local area for work experience, what else can I do to maximise my chances of securing a PGCE PCET?

    4. Apart from the Student Finance payments, is there any more payments via grants or bursaries for the PGCE PCET and if so, can someone please send me a link, even if it's for the year just gone so I have some sort of idea.

    Thank you to anyone who takes the time out to help me with this.
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    (Original post by brodyy2k1)
    […] 1. Is it worth me considering doing a PGCE Citizenship instead of a PGCE PCET? I know Citizenship is compulsory at the moment but over the years there has been so much attempts to take it off the national curriculum I dont feel it would be a secure path to take for job security. Can people give me their on opinions on whether they agree or disagree and why

    2. I am trying to do all I can to secure a PGCE PCET, I hopefully obtain a 2:1 in law but at the worst I would get a 2:2 which it seems, some Universities would still accept. Apart from this I am going to apply to colleges and universities to see if I can get some work experience or shadow a lecturer. Who should I send these letters too? Should I email or send a proper letter and what should I put in it, as I have no idea how to maximise my chances of getting work experience? If so, would it matter what type of lessons it was or would it be better off being law?

    3. Apart from applying to colleges and universities in my local area for work experience, what else can I do to maximise my chances of securing a PGCE PCET?

    4. Apart from the Student Finance payments, is there any more payments via grants or bursaries for the PGCE PCET and if so, can someone please send me a link, even if it's for the year just gone so I have some sort of idea. […]
    1 – I cannot imagine any teacher ever got hired to teach citizenship by itself. But on the other hand, there are no PGCEs to teach law either, despite it being a GCSE and A level subject, so you are in a lose-lose situation really with such a niche subject.

    If you go the PGCE PCET route then at least you have a much better chance of actually getting to teach law, or being shown what is most likely going to get you employment (e.g. being transferable to other subjects such as philosophy or politics, for example). Likewise, you could supplement your main teaching with basic literacy and numeracy work.

    2 – Your degree classification should not matter that much as further education is generally less competitive than secondary. I would not send a letter. You run the risk of not getting any answers at all. I would see if your university run any part-time or community degrees or courses in law. These will most likely have mature students on them. Ask to sit in on them and help out; you can also ask for careers advice from the staff themselves as they might not always be the same staff which teach full-time undergraduates. The other option is just going into your local college and asking to speak to relevant staff.

    3 – Any relevant experience with people who are likely to be further education students, or shows you have good communication skills and empathy etc., etc. will be good. This does not have to be subject specific. You could tutor subjects unrelated to your degree to teenagers, you could volunteer with x organisation, or work for the Prince's Trust. It does not matter. In terms of formal experience, check your university's education department to see if they run anything. When I was at university I did the Student Associate Scheme (SAS) in a secondary school and actually got paid for it! Likewise, the same for Aimhigher. Michael Gove has probably shelved it all though.

    4 – Further education is funded by a different department to primary and secondary education. This means, for this year, there was only a tiny bursary for those specialising in literacy and numeracy as far as I am aware (I am talking £1000 and less on a first come first serve basis). Funding changes year on year so I would not count on receiving any bursary at all; the entire funding situation is a complete shambles to be honest. It is worth baring in mind that you would not receive anything if you went the secondary route, but at least with the post-compulsory route it is less demanding and you could feasibly do some part time work alongside the course.
 
 
 
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