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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    Got to see some ultrasound imaging today which was cool as it's something that's not done at the clinic I usually go to How the vets know what's going on with those grey blobs is beyond me!




    Is the farm far from the campus? How many animals did they have there? In the department where I was working they were looking after a couple of cows that apparently normally live in Camden. Guys were super friendly

    That sounds fascinating, I'm really jealous Have you ever seen that gif of the cat lungs being blown up with a pump? It's amazing how much air they can hold!

    Spoiler'd for any sceamish people who don't want organs on their screens
    Spoiler:
    Show


    It was amazing! It was actually offered as a chicken dissection, so you can imagine the delight of everybody watching when he wheeled out this massive feathered beast! I think there was always a plan for it to be an ostrich, they just said chicken just in case an ostrich wasn't available (the bird was from a farm and had to be euthanised, it wasn't killed purely for the dissection ). They still did a chicken (and a swan too!) and the guy doing it showed us all the differences between flying and non-flying birds It was all a part of a free event they ran called 'Night at the Vet School', which I'm pretty sure they do every year so definitely check it out next time if you're interested

    You'll make it, I have faith in you
    Everything is just grey blobs :P

    It was about a 20 minute walk away, so it was close. They had quite a few animals there. I lost count of all the cows there :P

    It was fascinating. Wish I spent more time looking at the fox now. I think I have seen that gif before. The lungs look too big for a cat!

    I don't think they really pumped them that full of air in the fox. It looked as if it was sleeping...you know, if it wasn't for the fact it had its underbelly cut open.

    That sounds really interesting. Did you just observe, or were you allowed to get hands on? So they dissected 3 birds in total? What an evening Was it at Camden or Hawkshead? I would love to attend it, but I live too far away for an overnight event.

    Haha as do I have faith in you
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    It was amazing! It was actually offered as a chicken dissection, so you can imagine the delight of everybody watching when he wheeled out this massive feathered beast! I think there was always a plan for it to be an ostrich, they just said chicken just in case an ostrich wasn't available (the bird was from a farm and had to be euthanised, it wasn't killed purely for the dissection ). They still did a chicken (and a swan too!) and the guy doing it showed us all the differences between flying and non-flying birds It was all a part of a free event they ran called 'Night at the Vet School', which I'm pretty sure they do every year so definitely check it out next time if you're interested
    I was working as a student ambassador at this event (I was the student helping out/hanging around during this dissection).

    They were hoping to get something impressive to dissect - but it was touch and go as to if they managed it or not. They didn't think they were going to - hence the swan, the ostrich was a last minute addition!

    The guy who was doing the dissection is amazing! He recently got an MBE for services to veterinary science. He does the anatomy dissection teaching with pre clinical students and is so enthusiastic with it and very good at teaching.

    The "night at the vet school" event has run for the last two years - and as far as I know will run again, there is a different theme each year, so it would be worth going again if you enjoyed this years.
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    (Original post by kookabura)
    I was working as a student ambassador at this event (I was the student helping out/hanging around during this dissection).
    That was you!? Small world eh! I doubt you'll remember me, but I was sitting on the end of a row on the right, a couple of rows back. The ostrich sternum awkwardly stopped at me when it was being passed around because everyone I tried to give it to had already had it so I think you collected it from me at the end

    He was awesome! Another student introduced him to me in the anatomy museum bit before the demonstration so I had the pleasure of speaking to him for a few minutes.

    I'll definitely be going again You guys all did a sterling job. Thanks for all your hard work


    (Original post by OutAtStarlight)
    Everything is just grey blobs :P
    Tell me about it! The ultrasound specialists must train for ages. I was just about able to identify a kidney, and I'm sure it will be a loooong time before I can do anything better than that!

    20 minutes isn't so bad . Is it an actual food producing farm or do they just keep the animals there for teaching purposes?

    They do look big, I thought the same! Especially seeing as cats tend to have reasonably narrow chests.

    Mostly it was observation (and they had a camera so it was projected onto a screen too), but the person doing it let us come down at the end for a closer look. He showed us three birds, but the chicken and swan were already cut up. It was in Camden, which is a lot easier to get to on public transport than Hawkshead. Fortunately for me I live in London, so it only took me about half an hour to get there. The event didn't run all night, despite the name (I think it was something like 5:00-8:00?), but yeah, if you live a bit further afield it might be a bit tricky to get down for only a few hours

    Have you heard of The RVC on Tour, by the way? They're giving talks in schools across the country on applications and such. I didn't get to go last year, as the sessions are in September and I wasn't sure what my school timetable was doing to be like and by the time I knew all the places were booked. I bagsied a place for this year, though . Just thought you might be interested
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)


    Tell me about it! The ultrasound specialists must train for ages. I was just about able to identify a kidney, and I'm sure it will be a loooong time before I can do anything better than that!

    20 minutes isn't so bad . Is it an actual food producing farm or do they just keep the animals there for teaching purposes?

    They do look big, I thought the same! Especially seeing as cats tend to have reasonably narrow chests.

    Mostly it was observation (and they had a camera so it was projected onto a screen too), but the person doing it let us come down at the end for a closer look. He showed us three birds, but the chicken and swan were already cut up. It was in Camden, which is a lot easier to get to on public transport than Hawkshead. Fortunately for me I live in London, so it only took me about half an hour to get there. The event didn't run all night, despite the name (I think it was something like 5:00-8:00?), but yeah, if you live a bit further afield it might be a bit tricky to get down for only a few hours

    Have you heard of The RVC on Tour, by the way? They're giving talks in schools across the country on applications and such. I didn't get to go last year, as the sessions are in September and I wasn't sure what my school timetable was doing to be like and by the time I knew all the places were booked. I bagsied a place for this year, though . Just thought you might be interested
    I could barely see a kidney! You identified more than me

    It was a nice walk up there, through all the fields. I'm not sure, to be honest. I think it was mainly animals for teaching. The cows are used for milk though.

    Yeah, Camden was easy enough to get to. And this is from someone who had never used London transport before going to the summer school I thought it did run all night from when I saw it on the website. The whole evening does sound fascinating though.

    I have heard of it, but I've never really looked into it. I just did though. The closest place was still an hours journey away, so I doubt I'll go to it. Thanks, though
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    Me when I'm at work placements: Awww yeah this is awesome and when I get home I'm gonna look all of this up in detail and I'm gonna type up all my notes hell yeah and then I'll work on my personal statement and do some BMAT prep and work on my EPQ then I'll go for a run *** yeah productive summer im gonna be a fab university applicant

    Me when I get home: Yes hello Tumblr how are you and oh yes a nap sounds good oh dear its 8:00 better eat something and take a shower ahh yes lets watch breaking bad and homeland and oitnb and a bunch of movies and lets go see Guardians of the Galaxy yep

    Repeat every day

    (GotG was v. good though go watch it)



    (Original post by OutAtStarlight)
    I could barely see a kidney! You identified more than me

    It was a nice walk up there, through all the fields. I'm not sure, to be honest. I think it was mainly animals for teaching. The cows are used for milk though.

    Yeah, Camden was easy enough to get to. And this is from someone who had never used London transport before going to the summer school I thought it did run all night from when I saw it on the website. The whole evening does sound fascinating though.

    I have heard of it, but I've never really looked into it. I just did though. The closest place was still an hours journey away, so I doubt I'll go to it. Thanks, though
    Potters Bar is beauuuuuuuutiful :love: . If I lived there I'd never be indoors I reckon It's too lovely to waste. I wish I'd gone to see the farm now

    Yeah, the dissection was definitely the highlight but they had a lot of other stuff going on There was a presentation on how similar dinosaurs were to modern birds and it was really interesting

    That's a pity, it is a shame that they only run five sessions per year (the timing seems awkward too? I would organise it to be in July when exams are coming to an end and serious considerations about university courses are being made, but that's just me ) If you have any questions for the admissions staff that you'd like me to ask for you feel free to drop me a PM
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)


    Potters Bar is beauuuuuuuutiful :love: . If I lived there I'd never be indoors I reckon It's too lovely to waste. I wish I'd gone to see the farm now

    Yeah, the dissection was definitely the highlight but they had a lot of other stuff going on There was a presentation on how similar dinosaurs were to modern birds and it was really interesting

    That's a pity, it is a shame that they only run five sessions per year (the timing seems awkward too? I would organise it to be in July when exams are coming to an end and serious considerations about university courses are being made, but that's just me ) If you have any questions for the admissions staff that you'd like me to ask for you feel free to drop me a PM
    Haha I'd be taking long walks every day I'd recommend seeing the farm. It was really interesting.

    I would have liked to have seen that presentation. I love anything to do with dinosaurs and evolution

    I thought there would have been more than 5 sessions, as they are going around the UK. You make a valid point there I'll keep that in mind, thank you
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    For anybody that's interested, I really recommend BBC One's Operation Wild, which started today. As the name suggests, it's all about veterinary medicine on wild animals and it was really interesting. This week they had an amputation of a gorilla's arm as well as ultrasound scanning of a manta ray and loads more Check it out if you have time.

    Also, I'm sure most of you have noticed 'Stalking Pages' over the years, which were Wiki pages where applicants could enter their details and update them over the course of the application process so that others could have an idea of when interviews/offers were being given out. Said pages had quite a few issues, such as being prone to vandalism. They were also quite messy and some people found them difficult to use. TSR has streamlined the service, with University Connect replacing the old pages. I've entered some details, I just thought I'd give a link on here if anybody else wanted to do the same

    (Original post by OutAtStarlight)
    Haha I'd be taking long walks every day I'd recommend seeing the farm. It was really interesting.

    I would have liked to have seen that presentation. I love anything to do with dinosaurs and evolution

    I thought there would have been more than 5 sessions, as they are going around the UK. You make a valid point there I'll keep that in mind, thank you
    Ditto

    It was pretty cool Some people were making notes but I didn't have the sense to :lol:

    Yeah, it's only for one week unfortunately. They do go quite far, but I can see that it would still be tricky for someone not living in an area with good transport links
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    Opinions on an EPQ on schmallenberg? I've decided I want to do it on something in farming
    And for personal statements, I said 'veterinary surgeon' the first time, but then just said 'vet' from then on to save on space, or should I keep on using the full name?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by KateLivesey)
    That will count as work experience and employment too if it was paid so you would put it in both I would say


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    Thank youuuu!
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    (Original post by Percival Weasley)
    Opinions on an EPQ on schmallenberg? I've decided I want to do it on something in farming
    And for personal statements, I said 'veterinary surgeon' the first time, but then just said 'vet' from then on to save on space, or should I keep on using the full name?
    Thanks
    I am not sure there is that much research out there on schmallenberg compared to some other diseases so I'm only a bit concerned that you might not have enough words to write about it, but then again I'm not entirely sure what is involved in an EPQ as I never did one.


    As a PS helper, I'd say to write it out in full if possible as it sounds more formal and professional. You are only really adding one word extra, and I am sure you can probable shorten other sentences.
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    What about "veterinarian"? One word but still more professional sounding than the short form/slang term.
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    (Original post by Tarnia)
    What about "veterinarian"? One word but still more professional sounding than the short form/slang term.
    I always thought that was the American term for it?
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    I always thought that was the American term for it?
    It is indeed

    Veterinary Surgeon is the term over here
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    Would that be an issue though? I used veterinarian all the time I was studying in Edi, never got called on it. It is a grammatically/English correct word, but sticking to either British or American English (consistency) is often preferred you are right so maybe ask your supervisor?
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    I think I will keep Veterinary Surgeon then, though I will check at school. I wish there was more character limit - already over the max. and still got the rest of summers wex to add :O What other diseases (in farms) can I do? (apart from bovine TB & badgers, everyone seems to be doing that!) Cheers
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    (Original post by Percival Weasley)
    I think I will keep Veterinary Surgeon then, though I will check at school. I wish there was more character limit - already over the max. and still got the rest of summers wex to add :O What other diseases (in farms) can I do? (apart from bovine TB & badgers, everyone seems to be doing that!) Cheers
    I'm doing mine on BSE and other prion diseases . My vet introduced me to the topic randomly several months ago and I just found it ****ing incredible how things that are not alive can cause infectious disease I have a few books on the subject so I'll finish up on reading those over summer
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    Wondering about specialisation.. Do you take another couple of years after the uni course to specialise in something. Also can you only specialise in one species or can you be specific such as ortho in that species? Just wondering...
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    Most 'generalists' will focus in on one specific "class" of species-that is, small animal, farm animal, pigs and also poultry are often individual classes, equine, wildlife, research....exotics is often mixed in with small animal. To be a generalist but focus on one 'sector' does not REQUIRE extra training, though some fields may ask for it (an MSc may help you with research for example).

    If you want to be a board-certified specialist, and given the appropriate credentials and title, then yes, you need to do extra training. Generally this is another 4 to 5 years (depending on whether your internship year is credited as part of your residency). The exit exams can also be very challenging, so just because you do your 4 years doesn't mean you will get the certification.

    Many people will have an 'area of interest' or 'focus' eg in orthopaedics and do a lot of that without being board certified. You just can't call yourself a certified orthopaedic surgeon.
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    (Original post by Percival Weasley)
    I think I will keep Veterinary Surgeon then, though I will check at school. I wish there was more character limit - already over the max. and still got the rest of summers wex to add :O What other diseases (in farms) can I do? (apart from bovine TB & badgers, everyone seems to be doing that!) Cheers
    I agree with veterinary surgeon Veterinarian, whilst technically correct, is not really a term they use over here, so the former is probably your best bet for sounding legit!

    I'm doing mine on managing lameness levels in dairy herds - a lot of livestock veterinary work seems to be focused on herd health rather than the individual, so apart from lameness, fertility and mastitis seem to be the main contenders that can potentially be 'trends' in herds (as in, there was a 45% increase in mastitis levels in Mr Jones's herd, why was that, what could be done to prevent this from happening again etc).

    I've actually just finished a book called Farmageddon, written by the ceo of compassion in world farming. It's about the intensive farming industry and its effects at both a local and international scale. Really well written with an interesting chapter on the role of the vet - obviously some parts are quite biased and sensationalised however it's very thought provoking on the whole. Would def recommend to any aspiring vets interesting in specialising in livestock later on!

    Anyone else s***ting themselves about results?!? Keep having vivid dreams (omens?!) featuring my chemistry teacher and dead cats....
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    (Original post by ABC05)
    I agree with veterinary surgeon Veterinarian, whilst technically correct, is not really a term they use over here, so the former is probably your best bet for sounding legit!

    I'm doing mine on managing lameness levels in dairy herds - a lot of livestock veterinary work seems to be focused on herd health rather than the individual, so apart from lameness, fertility and mastitis seem to be the main contenders that can potentially be 'trends' in herds (as in, there was a 45% increase in mastitis levels in Mr Jones's herd, why was that, what could be done to prevent this from happening again etc).

    I've actually just finished a book called Farmageddon, written by the ceo of compassion in world farming. It's about the intensive farming industry and its effects at both a local and international scale. Really well written with an interesting chapter on the role of the vet - obviously some parts are quite biased and sensationalised however it's very thought provoking on the whole. Would def recommend to any aspiring vets interesting in specialising in livestock later on!

    Anyone else s***ting themselves about results?!? Keep having vivid dreams (omens?!) featuring my chemistry teacher and dead cats....
    Lameness? That sounds pretty interesting actually - and, as I saw foot trimming at the dairy farm I went to, it would fit in nice But would kind of ethical questions are there?
    Also, is the book, Farmageddon, called 'The true cost of cheap meat' or 'Food and culture of biotechnology' ... there seems to be two on amazon!! And thanks for mentioning results day, dreading it! And I will have to wait till evening to open the envelope as I'm doing WEX!:eek:
 
 
 
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