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Politics should be mandatory in schools Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should Politics be incorporated into the mandatory school curriculum.
    Yes, but only the basics (no room for bias)
    66.00%
    Yes, include as much information as possible (despite threat of bias)
    18.00%
    No, the idea is ludicrous
    16.00%

    • Thread Starter
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    We experience clear voter apathy here in Britain. In the 2010 elections, only 65% of people bothered to vote (down from an average 75% between 1945 -1992).

    This is the result of a developing culture where an obsession with 'social capital' and individual pursuit has left us feeling powerless in the political field. We vehemently regurgitate the arguments of our favourite media, without introducing critical thinking, opinion or research. Our democracy is sundered by an incapability to truly shape and regulate our representatives.

    I think that basic political education will help inspire people to participate in the system. We already have epetitions - a severely underrated tool. Imagine if people were politically knowledgeable enough to use it to full effect - with fluent and imaginative ideas. A positive for all, surely?
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    I think politics would be far more beneficial than religious studies.
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    (Original post by dartanoir)
    I think politics would be far more beneficial than religious studies.
    In my school we have to struggle through 'MyLife' - a mix of everything useless.
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    Yes. People are getting through school and have no idea what right/left/centre are about.
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    As long as we don't become the United States on this matter.

    I thought that slimeball Michaelle Gove was axing citizenship?
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    Definitely, I've always thought that children will benefit much more on something that actually affects their everyday lives, unlike certain subjects like RE which is about 3 hours a week at GCSE level in the school I went to. I always thought that instead of teaching RE, they should replace with the likes of PPE, one hour for each subject. Politics for reasons I just stated, Philosophy mainly because it could incorporate both theological and secularist ideals so people won't moan about getting rid of RE (to an extent), as well as some good ol' debating and Economics since people really need to know how their countries economy works, as well as general things like taking out loans and how to avoid getting into debt.

    My sister is in her mid 20's and today I asked her who the Prime Minister was, she honestly replied with Gordon Brown, she had never heard of David Cameron. Need I say more?
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    Bias is what made me drop AS politics.

    Quote my teacher 'Ukip, is a very right wing party with terrible policies regarding Europe'

    I got an A in AS, still dropped it.
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    I wish my college had politics as an A level, hopefully i'll get into university and study it there for the first time though.
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    No. I have no interest in politics and wouldn't pay any attention, much like I did in Geography (well the social side). The lessons would be a waste of time for me, and I'd much rather spend my time on something I was interested in. When would this be compulsory up to anyway? Year 9? It'd be another 4 years until we'd be able to vote anyway, and so opinions would change over that time - as would some party's stances. It'd be pretty pointless as far as I'm concerned - don't force something on someone which isn't vital to know. Same goes for RE as far as I'm concerned (even though that interested me).
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    (Original post by Jordan-James)
    Bias is what made me drop AS politics.

    Quote my teacher 'Ukip, is a very right wing party with terrible policies regarding Europe'

    I got an A in AS, still dropped it.
    Hmmmm - that's the risk bias could lead to a perennial labour government if you end up with indoctrination
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    Well, in order to understand politics one must get an adequate picture of the economy. Otherwise we will mass-produce free market conservatives and utopian socialists without the fundamental knowledge of the political economy.
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    Something like this really needs to be introduced, but like people have said, it could include basic economics and the basics of different religions. We don't need to learn about how religious radio programmes could influence people into not believing in any God!
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    (Original post by EvilOfficer)
    Well, in order to understand politics one must get an adequate picture of the economy. Otherwise we will mass-produce free market conservatives and utopian socialists without the fundamental knowledge of the political economy.
    :rolleyes: exactly... you may not know this but in the UK people don't actually know the difference between cyclical and structural deficit, as a matter in fact my political class doesn't exactly know the law of value or growth
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    I had something called 'Citizenship' at school where basically we spent 80% of the time learning why we shouldn't take drugs, plus other bits like sex education (very basic considering it was a Catholic school). I think it would have been incredibly useful to include politics in this, as I am pretty clueless now. Don't think it should be taught as a compulsory whole module with a GCSE at the end (like I was forced to do with RS), but it should be offered, and putting in some political study in years 7-9 is a great idea.
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    I would like to point out that even those who are educated in politics and who do keep up to date with what's going on in the world choose not to vote.
    Educating people won't always make them go and vote, some people have other reasons.
    I partially agree that it should be mandatory perhaps in the first two years of high school and it should include all the available arguments, but after that I think stuent should be free to make their own choice as to whether they're interested in the subject.
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    It should be included, I spend an hour a week doing citizenship/pshe and, to phrase it in a word, it's complete and utter ****. And another 2 hours doing religious studies, a lesson which I didn't want to do but is compulsory at my school.

    Politics would help people understand how the government works and all the types of parties. I would much prefer to learn about politics than all that rubbish that we currently have to do in my school.
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    What if learning more about politics just made people feel even more apathetic and powerless?

    Should the teacher lie and tell people their vote makes any difference when for the majority of people living outside swing seats, it doesn't.
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    Critical thinking would be even more beneficial, I think

    Granted the extent to which a skill like that can be taught is limited, but it is a seriously important skill
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    I agree. If we could get a broad and neutral understanding of politics upon leaving school it would be amazing. I must admit, my knowledge of politics is very shaky (something I'm trying to rectify now), and it shouldn't be so as it is plays such a pivotal role in our society.
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    (Original post by Tiina)
    I had something called 'Citizenship' at school where basically we spent 80% of the time learning why we shouldn't take drugs, plus other bits like sex education (very basic considering it was a Catholic school). I think it would have been incredibly useful to include politics in this, as I am pretty clueless now. Don't think it should be taught as a compulsory whole module with a GCSE at the end (like I was forced to do with RS), but it should be offered, and putting in some political study in years 7-9 is a great idea.
    This. I absolutely hated citizenship, it was a half gcse, a crap campaign coursework assessment e.g. make a facebook page try write information on conflict in Africa and then have an exam where its all just general knowledge, I believe politics would be more beneficial and interesting that citizen'****' as I have come to call it.
 
 
 
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