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How I revise for my A-Levels... Watch

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    I've been seeing loads of threads recently with people asking how to revise efficiently, so I thought I'd try and share my knowledge. This is how I do things, and it hasn't failed me so far:

    - REVISE AS YOU GO ALONG. Can't stress this enough. When you get in from college or school or whatever, spend time going over your notes. Reread the page, make notes on the page, do the questions, do whatever it takes until you understand it. Don't say 'oh, I'll revise for an hour'. If it takes you an hour, it takes an hour. If it takes 3 hours, so be it. If it takes 5 minutes, great!

    - Don't spend like 8 hours a day revising. I honestly don't understand how some people manage this. After a certain amount of time, your brain stops taking things in. You get stressed. You start wasting time and confusing yourself unnecessarily.

    - Take the weekend off! You deserve it. I usually do any spare homework at the weekends, or if I'm doing resits for anything, spend my weekends revising the for resits.

    - In the holidays, go over everything you've learned so far in each subject. If you're going over content as you go along (which you should be!), it shouldn't be too difficult. Do the exam questions in the book. Read over your poetry anthology. Your holidays probably aren't going to be very fun, but it'll be worth it in the long run.

    - DON'T WASTE YOUR FREE PERIODS. Again, I just can't stress this enough. I know it can be hard if your friends are going to McDonalds or whatever, but in all honesty, you're probably only going to know these people for another 2 years or so. By all means, don't work through lunchtime, have some time off...but revising in your frees really will help, trust me.

    - Slot in some revision in the mornings. Do a couple of maths questions in the cafeteria, read a few pages of your textbook when you're on the bus instead of staring blankly into space, it all adds up.

    - Start past papers about a month before your exams. When you've done them, do them again.
    For biology and chemistry, I memorise the mark schemes and key words.
    For maths, I just do the papers over and over again.
    For English literature, I read examiners reports and essays of others who have scored highly so I know what examiners are looking for. Memorise assessment objectives.

    - Don't revise the night before your exam. Sure, read over some notes for an hour or so, but the chances are, if you don't know it now, you're never going to know it. Just relax!

    I know a few of these are probably fairly obvious, but this is how I managed to get AAA in my January exams. Hope I helped at least one person!

    Also, thought I'd mention a couple of things more specific to my subjects:
    - I don't bother creating pretty mind maps and posters. By the time you've chosen the colour for your title, you could have learned something new.
    - I put all of my notes from class in the bin. My teachers disagree with me, but most of the 'notes' we copy down in class are often written much clearer in the textbook (EXCEPT English).
    - My teachers also always tell me to 'read around' my subjects. I've never understood this in the slightest. If it's not on the syllabus, you probably don't need to know it, and it will probably confuse you. I suppose some of the arts subjects might be different, but even for English, there are very few marks for this sort of thing. Of course, if you're really interested in the subject, find out more by all means.
    - I don't bother scrutinizing examiners reports for science subjects. Once again, many people find it useful, I just don't see the point.
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    I've been seeing loads of threads recently with people asking how to revise efficiently, so I thought I'd try and share my knowledge. This is how I do things, and it hasn't failed me so far:

    - REVISE AS YOU GO ALONG. Can't stress this enough. When you get in from college or school or whatever, spend time going over your notes. Reread the page, make notes on the page, do the questions, do whatever it takes until you understand it. Don't say 'oh, I'll revise for an hour'. If it takes you an hour, it takes an hour. If it takes 3 hours, so be it. If it takes 5 minutes, great!

    - Don't spend like 8 hours a day revising. I honestly don't understand how some people manage this. After a certain amount of time, your brain stops taking things in. You get stressed. You start wasting time and confusing yourself unnecessarily.

    - Take the weekend off! You deserve it. I usually do any spare homework at the weekends, or if I'm doing resits for anything, spend my weekends revising the for resits.

    - In the holidays, go over everything you've learned so far in each subject. If you're going over content as you go along (which you should be!), it shouldn't be too difficult. Do the exam questions in the book. Read over your poetry anthology. Your holidays probably aren't going to be very fun, but it'll be worth it in the long run.

    - DON'T WASTE YOUR FREE PERIODS. Again, I just can't stress this enough. I know it can be hard if your friends are going to McDonalds or whatever, but in all honesty, you're probably only going to know these people for another 2 years or so. By all means, don't work through lunchtime, have some time off...but revising in your frees really will help, trust me.

    - Slot in some revision in the mornings. Do a couple of maths questions in the cafeteria, read a few pages of your textbook when you're on the bus instead of staring blankly into space, it all adds up.

    - Start past papers about a month before your exams. When you've done them, do them again.
    For biology and chemistry, I memorise the mark schemes and key words.
    For maths, I just do the papers over and over again.
    For English literature, I read examiners reports and essays of others who have scored highly so I know what examiners are looking for. Memorise assessment objectives.

    - Don't revise the night before your exam. Sure, read over some notes for an hour or so, but the chances are, if you don't know it now, you're never going to know it. Just relax!

    I know a few of these are probably fairly obvious, but this is how I managed to get AAA in my January exams. Hope I helped at least one person!
    This is what I do, well I don't go over the stuff I did in class until around a month or 2 weeks later as I make set of notes with help from different sources and the mark scheme, I agree with the free periods idea a lot, I have done this this year after cocking up last year and makes you more motivated as a person to do more and more work. May I ask you is going over the material done in class the evening after the lesson really worth it, how do you do it?


    Thanks ( I gave you +ve as this is the right way to study)
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    I've been seeing loads of threads recently with people asking how to revise efficiently, so I thought I'd try and share my knowledge. This is how I do things, and it hasn't failed me so far:

    - REVISE AS YOU GO ALONG. Can't stress this enough. When you get in from college or school or whatever, spend time going over your notes. Reread the page, make notes on the page, do the questions, do whatever it takes until you understand it. Don't say 'oh, I'll revise for an hour'. If it takes you an hour, it takes an hour. If it takes 3 hours, so be it. If it takes 5 minutes, great!

    - Don't spend like 8 hours a day revising. I honestly don't understand how some people manage this. After a certain amount of time, your brain stops taking things in. You get stressed. You start wasting time and confusing yourself unnecessarily.

    - Take the weekend off! You deserve it. I usually do any spare homework at the weekends, or if I'm doing resits for anything, spend my weekends revising the for resits.

    - In the holidays, go over everything you've learned so far in each subject. If you're going over content as you go along (which you should be!), it shouldn't be too difficult. Do the exam questions in the book. Read over your poetry anthology. Your holidays probably aren't going to be very fun, but it'll be worth it in the long run.

    - DON'T WASTE YOUR FREE PERIODS. Again, I just can't stress this enough. I know it can be hard if your friends are going to McDonalds or whatever, but in all honesty, you're probably only going to know these people for another 2 years or so. By all means, don't work through lunchtime, have some time off...but revising in your frees really will help, trust me.

    - Slot in some revision in the mornings. Do a couple of maths questions in the cafeteria, read a few pages of your textbook when you're on the bus instead of staring blankly into space, it all adds up.

    - Start past papers about a month before your exams. When you've done them, do them again.
    For biology and chemistry, I memorise the mark schemes and key words.
    For maths, I just do the papers over and over again.
    For English literature, I read examiners reports and essays of others who have scored highly so I know what examiners are looking for. Memorise assessment objectives.

    - Don't revise the night before your exam. Sure, read over some notes for an hour or so, but the chances are, if you don't know it now, you're never going to know it. Just relax!

    I know a few of these are probably fairly obvious, but this is how I managed to get AAA in my January exams. Hope I helped at least one person!
    I was really motivated last year and used all my free periods to do notes which failed in the end. This year I just do homework in them. Had a few Jan exams, one I got an A and another a B. I got the A by doing past paper after past paper. But I do think the last minute cramming did help as one question came up on it. Plus I'm always way too nervous so I stare absent mindedly at the textbook..

    This was actually useful and I need to work on time management from now on! I'm awful at working at home. Never managed 8 hour days so I agree on that!
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    thank you for this
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    I've been seeing loads of threads recently with people asking how to revise efficiently, so I thought I'd try and share my knowledge. This is how I do things, and it hasn't failed me so far:

    - REVISE AS YOU GO ALONG. Can't stress this enough. When you get in from college or school or whatever, spend time going over your notes. Reread the page, make notes on the page, do the questions, do whatever it takes until you understand it. Don't say 'oh, I'll revise for an hour'. If it takes you an hour, it takes an hour. If it takes 3 hours, so be it. If it takes 5 minutes, great!

    - Don't spend like 8 hours a day revising. I honestly don't understand how some people manage this. After a certain amount of time, your brain stops taking things in. You get stressed. You start wasting time and confusing yourself unnecessarily.

    - Take the weekend off! You deserve it. I usually do any spare homework at the weekends, or if I'm doing resits for anything, spend my weekends revising the for resits.

    - In the holidays, go over everything you've learned so far in each subject. If you're going over content as you go along (which you should be!), it shouldn't be too difficult. Do the exam questions in the book. Read over your poetry anthology. Your holidays probably aren't going to be very fun, but it'll be worth it in the long run.

    - DON'T WASTE YOUR FREE PERIODS. Again, I just can't stress this enough. I know it can be hard if your friends are going to McDonalds or whatever, but in all honesty, you're probably only going to know these people for another 2 years or so. By all means, don't work through lunchtime, have some time off...but revising in your frees really will help, trust me.

    - Slot in some revision in the mornings. Do a couple of maths questions in the cafeteria, read a few pages of your textbook when you're on the bus instead of staring blankly into space, it all adds up.

    - Start past papers about a month before your exams. When you've done them, do them again.
    For biology and chemistry, I memorise the mark schemes and key words.
    For maths, I just do the papers over and over again.
    For English literature, I read examiners reports and essays of others who have scored highly so I know what examiners are looking for. Memorise assessment objectives.

    - Don't revise the night before your exam. Sure, read over some notes for an hour or so, but the chances are, if you don't know it now, you're never going to know it. Just relax!

    I know a few of these are probably fairly obvious, but this is how I managed to get AAA in my January exams. Hope I helped at least one person!
    Thank you for this post! This sounds like a pretty good technique, I'm going to try your way as mine didn't work! :unimpressed:

    Question: Do you think I'm being realistic in aiming for all B's if I start this revision technique now? Bearing in mind I have 11 bloody exams over May/June (7 AS's and 4A2's)

    I apologise if this is a stupid question but I'm starting panic that the stress of all these exams will be too much and I'm looking for any reassurance whatsoever haha.

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    Brilliant advice, although I'm starting to think that past papers aren't as important as we all make them out to be. For January exams, I only did 3 chemistry past papers, started them 3 days before the exam, and came out with a higher A than biology, which I did 6 past papers and way more revision for :hmmm:


    (Original post by namelocscott)
    Thank you for this post! This sounds like a pretty good technique, I'm going to try your way as mine didn't work! :unimpressed:

    Question: Do you think I'm being realistic in aiming for all B's if I start this revision technique now? Bearing in mind I have 11 bloody exams over May/June (7 AS's and 4A2's)

    I apologise if this is a stupid question but I'm starting panic that the stress of all these exams will be too much and I'm looking for any reassurance whatsoever haha.

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    It's not unrealistic at all if you work hard enough Just be organised, follow this girl's advice, and don't spend all your time procrastinating. I presume some of those exams are resits, so focus on the ones that are worth the most marks.
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    (Original post by liquid394)
    This is what I do, well I don't go over the stuff I did in class until around a month or 2 weeks later as I make set of notes with help from different sources and the mark scheme, I agree with the free periods idea a lot, I have done this this year after cocking up last year and makes you more motivated as a person to do more and more work. May I ask you is going over the material done in class the evening after the lesson really worth it, how do you do it?


    Thanks ( I gave you +ve as this is the right way to study)
    I'm glad you agree!
    Yeah, I think going over it a month or so later is always a good idea, too. I usually just go over and over stuff in my free periods to keep it fresh in my head. It really is worth it for biology and chemistry, I've found. My teachers go through the spec pretty fast, so I like to make sure I fully understand everything so I don't fall behind. I usually just find the page in the textbook, read it, again, make notes on the important parts, and do all the summary questions. For maths, I don't usually bother going over the content unless I got stuck on something, and for lit, I often don't bother either. Sometimes I'll copy up notes into my anthology, but that's it really.
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    (Original post by namelocscott)
    Thank you for this post! This sounds like a pretty good technique, I'm going to try your way as mine didn't work! :unimpressed:

    Question: Do you think I'm being realistic in aiming for all B's if I start this revision technique now? Bearing in mind I have 11 bloody exams over May/June (7 AS's and 4A2's)

    I apologise if this is a stupid question but I'm starting panic that the stress of all these exams will be too much and I'm looking for any reassurance whatsoever haha.

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    Haha, of course you're not being unrealistic! It's possible to get all A's, if you put your mind to it.

    What exams will you be taking?
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    good advice!
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    (Original post by suncake)
    Brilliant advice, although I'm starting to think that past papers aren't as important as we all make them out to be. For January exams, I only did 3 chemistry past papers, started them 3 days before the exam, and came out with a higher A than biology, which I did 6 past papers and way more revision for :hmmm:
    Hmm, to be honest, I think chemistry's just a bit easier to grasp (for me, anyway)!
    With chemistry, I found the papers to be pretty repetitive, and they have pretty straightforward answers. I didn't actually do too much revision for chemistry, and I managed to get an A.

    With biology, on the other hand, I spent ages going over and over past papers! I don't know what it is with biology, I just find the exams very difficult. There's a lot of odd HSW questions, and it's a lot harder to get the precise answers that the examiners want. When revising, I use the textbook a lot for chemistry, but I barely use the textbook for biology. Everyone's different, though. I found the past papers really helpful for the ISA exams as well, but our teachers told us not to bother using them as they're useless, so who knows. :rolleyes:
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    Thanks for sharing this, but I got a question OP. How do you manage time effectively ? Because motivation isn't the problem, its just I procrastinate often .. What a levels are you studying ?
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    (Original post by Midnight1811)
    Thanks for sharing this, but I got a question OP. How do you manage time effectively ? Because motivation isn't the problem, its just I procrastinate often .. What a levels are you studying ?
    I have the same problem.
    I just set myself a list of things I NEED to do that day. It's much more effective than saying 'oh, I'll revise for 3 hours today' because if I do that, my '3 hours' usually ends up being about half an hour of productive revision. This is why I find it easier to revise in frees. If you're sitting in the library, then really there is nothing else to do apart from revise.

    I'm studying biology, chemistry, maths and English literature.
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    I have the same problem.
    I just set myself a list of things I NEED to do that day. It's much more effective than saying 'oh, I'll revise for 3 hours today' because if I do that, my '3 hours' usually ends up being about half an hour of productive revision. This is why I find it easier to revise in frees. If you're sitting in the library, then really there is nothing else to do apart from revise.

    I'm studying biology, chemistry, maths and English literature.
    My a level choices are pretty simlar apart from eng lit, replace that with IT & then your onto a winner !. Anyway I've got a few question regarding Chemistry GCSE revision. What are the fundamental things I need to know for A-level chemistry ? Because apparently its a huge leap from GCSE standard. Just wondering because I don't want to catchup on things I should of already known... I'm confident with biology but as for maths what advice would you give fro. What you've learnt from the step up from gcses to a levels. Thanks for replying in the first place :-)
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    Hmm, to be honest, I think chemistry's just a bit easier to grasp (for me, anyway)!
    With chemistry, I found the papers to be pretty repetitive, and they have pretty straightforward answers. I didn't actually do too much revision for chemistry, and I managed to get an A.

    With biology, on the other hand, I spent ages going over and over past papers! I don't know what it is with biology, I just find the exams very difficult. There's a lot of odd HSW questions, and it's a lot harder to get the precise answers that the examiners want. When revising, I use the textbook a lot for chemistry, but I barely use the textbook for biology. Everyone's different, though. I found the past papers really helpful for the ISA exams as well, but our teachers told us not to bother using them as they're useless, so who knows. :rolleyes:
    I thought the opposite, I always struggled more with chemistry and that's why my results confused me Ah well, as long as we're doing well eh! We're also doing exactly the same subjects :awesome: Are you in year 12 or 13?
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    I've been seeing loads of threads recently with people asking how to revise efficiently, so I thought I'd try and share my knowledge. This is how I do things, and it hasn't failed me so far:

    - REVISE AS YOU GO ALONG. Can't stress this enough. When you get in from college or school or whatever, spend time going over your notes. Reread the page, make notes on the page, do the questions, do whatever it takes until you understand it. Don't say 'oh, I'll revise for an hour'. If it takes you an hour, it takes an hour. If it takes 3 hours, so be it. If it takes 5 minutes, great!

    - Don't spend like 8 hours a day revising. I honestly don't understand how some people manage this. After a certain amount of time, your brain stops taking things in. You get stressed. You start wasting time and confusing yourself unnecessarily.

    - Take the weekend off! You deserve it. I usually do any spare homework at the weekends, or if I'm doing resits for anything, spend my weekends revising the for resits.

    - In the holidays, go over everything you've learned so far in each subject. If you're going over content as you go along (which you should be!), it shouldn't be too difficult. Do the exam questions in the book. Read over your poetry anthology. Your holidays probably aren't going to be very fun, but it'll be worth it in the long run.

    - DON'T WASTE YOUR FREE PERIODS. Again, I just can't stress this enough. I know it can be hard if your friends are going to McDonalds or whatever, but in all honesty, you're probably only going to know these people for another 2 years or so. By all means, don't work through lunchtime, have some time off...but revising in your frees really will help, trust me.

    - Slot in some revision in the mornings. Do a couple of maths questions in the cafeteria, read a few pages of your textbook when you're on the bus instead of staring blankly into space, it all adds up.

    - Start past papers about a month before your exams. When you've done them, do them again.
    For biology and chemistry, I memorise the mark schemes and key words.
    For maths, I just do the papers over and over again.
    For English literature, I read examiners reports and essays of others who have scored highly so I know what examiners are looking for. Memorise assessment objectives.

    - Don't revise the night before your exam. Sure, read over some notes for an hour or so, but the chances are, if you don't know it now, you're never going to know it. Just relax!

    I know a few of these are probably fairly obvious, but this is how I managed to get AAA in my January exams. Hope I helped at least one person!

    Also, thought I'd mention a couple of things more specific to my subjects:
    - I don't bother creating pretty mind maps and posters. By the time you've chosen the colour for your title, you could have learned something new.
    - I put all of my notes from class in the bin. My teachers disagree with me, but most of the 'notes' we copy down in class are often written much clearer in the textbook (EXCEPT English).
    - My teachers also always tell me to 'read around' my subjects. I've never understood this in the slightest. If it's not on the syllabus, you probably don't need to know it, and it will probably confuse you. I suppose some of the arts subjects might be different, but even for English, there are very few marks for this sort of thing. Of course, if you're really interested in the subject, find out more by all means.
    - I don't bother scrutinizing examiners reports for science subjects. Once again, many people find it useful, I just don't see the point.
    This is basically 99% what I do :P

    And I know how everyone goes on about just reading your notes/textbook doesn't help and that you have to do mind maps and revisions cards and stuff.... I just think that's total crap and your just wasting time. All I do when revising is read my revision guide and I came out with straight As...


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    (Original post by suncake)
    Brilliant advice, although I'm starting to think that past papers aren't as important as we all make them out to be. For January exams, I only did 3 chemistry past papers, started them 3 days before the exam, and came out with a higher A than biology, which I did 6 past papers and way more revision for :hmmm:




    It's not unrealistic at all if you work hard enough Just be organised, follow this girl's advice, and don't spend all your time procrastinating. I presume some of those exams are resits, so focus on the ones that are worth the most marks.
    Yeah, 6 of them are resits ( I REALLY messed up on my January exams!); thank you for the reassurance, I feel better already! :yy:

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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    Haha, of course you're not being unrealistic! It's possible to get all A's, if you put your mind to it.

    What exams will you be taking?
    Thank you! Right I'm going to get them B's and I WILL get into Cardiff haha!

    My exams are
    AS Electronics:
    ELEC1
    ELEC2
    AS Physics:
    PH1(resit)
    PH2
    AS/A2 Psychology:
    PSYA2(resit)
    PSYA3(resit)
    PSYA4
    AS/A2 Chemistry:
    CHEM1(resit)
    CHEM2(resit)
    CHEM4(resit)
    CHEM5

    I'm hoping all hope isn't lost haha!
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    (Original post by Swords N Thorns)
    I've been seeing loads of threads recently with people asking how to revise efficiently, so I thought I'd try and share my knowledge. This is how I do things, and it hasn't failed me so far:

    - REVISE AS YOU GO ALONG. Can't stress this enough. When you get in from college or school or whatever, spend time going over your notes. Reread the page, make notes on the page, do the questions, do whatever it takes until you understand it. Don't say 'oh, I'll revise for an hour'. If it takes you an hour, it takes an hour. If it takes 3 hours, so be it. If it takes 5 minutes, great!

    - Don't spend like 8 hours a day revising. I honestly don't understand how some people manage this. After a certain amount of time, your brain stops taking things in. You get stressed. You start wasting time and confusing yourself unnecessarily.

    - Take the weekend off! You deserve it. I usually do any spare homework at the weekends, or if I'm doing resits for anything, spend my weekends revising the for resits.

    - In the holidays, go over everything you've learned so far in each subject. If you're going over content as you go along (which you should be!), it shouldn't be too difficult. Do the exam questions in the book. Read over your poetry anthology. Your holidays probably aren't going to be very fun, but it'll be worth it in the long run.

    - DON'T WASTE YOUR FREE PERIODS. Again, I just can't stress this enough. I know it can be hard if your friends are going to McDonalds or whatever, but in all honesty, you're probably only going to know these people for another 2 years or so. By all means, don't work through lunchtime, have some time off...but revising in your frees really will help, trust me.

    - Slot in some revision in the mornings. Do a couple of maths questions in the cafeteria, read a few pages of your textbook when you're on the bus instead of staring blankly into space, it all adds up.

    - Start past papers about a month before your exams. When you've done them, do them again.
    For biology and chemistry, I memorise the mark schemes and key words.
    For maths, I just do the papers over and over again.
    For English literature, I read examiners reports and essays of others who have scored highly so I know what examiners are looking for. Memorise assessment objectives.

    - Don't revise the night before your exam. Sure, read over some notes for an hour or so, but the chances are, if you don't know it now, you're never going to know it. Just relax!

    I know a few of these are probably fairly obvious, but this is how I managed to get AAA in my January exams. Hope I helped at least one person!

    Also, thought I'd mention a couple of things more specific to my subjects:
    - I don't bother creating pretty mind maps and posters. By the time you've chosen the colour for your title, you could have learned something new.
    - I put all of my notes from class in the bin. My teachers disagree with me, but most of the 'notes' we copy down in class are often written much clearer in the textbook (EXCEPT English).
    - My teachers also always tell me to 'read around' my subjects. I've never understood this in the slightest. If it's not on the syllabus, you probably don't need to know it, and it will probably confuse you. I suppose some of the arts subjects might be different, but even for English, there are very few marks for this sort of thing. Of course, if you're really interested in the subject, find out more by all means.
    - I don't bother scrutinizing examiners reports for science subjects. Once again, many people find it useful, I just don't see the point.
    Thanks this is so helpful and i have five exams in the summer (or maybe 6 havent decided on retaking AS English yet), do you think its too early to start revising/doing past papers i keep telling myself it is
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    (Original post by yas95)
    Thanks this is so helpful and i have five exams in the summer (or maybe 6 havent decided on retaking AS English yet), do you think its too early to start revising/doing past papers i keep telling myself it is
    You should be starting around this time by preparing notes and really getting into it. Im starting wednesday as i have a music performance to focus on first. The sooner the better now!

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    (Original post by Midnight1811)
    My a level choices are pretty simlar apart from eng lit, replace that with IT & then your onto a winner !. Anyway I've got a few question regarding Chemistry GCSE revision. What are the fundamental things I need to know for A-level chemistry ? Because apparently its a huge leap from GCSE standard. Just wondering because I don't want to catchup on things I should of already known... I'm confident with biology but as for maths what advice would you give fro. What you've learnt from the step up from gcses to a levels. Thanks for replying in the first place :-)
    To be honest, I didn't find the jump from GCSE to A Level chemistry very big at all (did AQA for both). I think people like to make out that the jump is a lot bigger than it is. The same goes for maths.

    With chemistry, unit 1 basically just builds upon unit 1 topics, with a few small new things thrown in. It's really not hard at all if you keep on top of it. The only things that you mind find difficult are some of the harder calculations, but if you're doing A level maths as well, I highly doubt that would be a problem.

    I found maths slightly trickier since I was never fantastic at GCSE, and at the start of the year I was getting D's, but don't let it put you off...my advice with maths is to do the solomon papers as well as the past papers, as the solomon papers are much harder, and sometimes examiners like to pick questions off them.
 
 
 
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