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    A degree is mostly just a costly signal to let the employer know you are clever and hardworking. It has much more to do with proving your intelligence than learning useful stuff. I do economics and people on my course get some good jobs but the subject isn't relevent to the work, it isn't relevent to any job. Even if you wanted to be a professional economist you still need to do a lot of post grad education before you can actually put it to any use.
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    (Original post by ionaboner)
    Doing an applied degree such as nursing and medicine leads you into one career. Careers in arts/social sciences often are done for enjoyment for the person and the value of a degree itself. People who study sociology could go into any number of jobs but could a medical grad?
    Yes a medical grad could do a number of different jobs, in fact there seems be a few medical grads who go into Investment Banking on the IB forum. Personally I think it's really weird but yet people do it. I think medicine, engineering, dentistry etc. grads would have a lot of transferable skills and people with those degrees could do a lot of jobs with those degrees.

    However I think employers might question their commitment as after all they have dedicated a good chunk of their lives to a vocational degree only to veer in a completely different direction! Seems odd, yet people do it!
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    (Original post by greatwaves)
    A lot of employers only look for graduates, despite the fact that they're not necessarily looking for graduates in any particular field, so a lot of these courses are really useful in that regard.
    Yeah but why work a job that isnt relevant to your studies? Get the point? There are similar jobs for those w/o degrees.
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    (Original post by Sternumator)
    A degree is mostly just a costly signal to let the employer know you are clever and hardworking. It has much more to do with proving your intelligence than learning useful stuff. I do economics and people on my course get some good jobs but the subject isn't relevent to the work, it isn't relevent to any job. Even if you wanted to be a professional economist you still need to do a lot of post grad education before you can actually put it to any use.
    See thats my point, thats all its shows, but isnt the aim of the degree to get you into that field or similarly so? What a waste studying something only to realise you cant put it towards something. Btw a degree isnt a sign of intelligence, hard work though.
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    See thats my point, thats all its shows, but isnt the aim of the degree to get you into that field or similarly so? What a waste studying something only to realise you cant put it towards something. Btw a degree isnt a sign of intelligence, hard work though.
    But I think a lot of jobs that don't require a degree initially, require a degree if you want to progress and get a promotion. When I applied for a promotion in my organisation, the application said 'Degree - desireable' and the further up the ladder you go, the more you will see 'degree - essential'.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Philosophy can provide a good foundation for further training/study to become a psychotherapist, socitor/barrister or computer scientist. All of these have some relevance to philosophy (logic for computer science, for example, and analytical skills for psychotherapy).

    History is of particular relevance to the Heritage Sector. Many of the jobs in the Heritage Sector may require postgraduate study, but it remains that these aren't jobs a person without a degree can get.

    Geography, and some other social sciences, are of particular relevance to town planning, surveying, and those sorts of professions (though they will need to take a professional masters degree).

    In terms of graduate jobs, the usual graduate entry schemes across the public, private and voluntary sectors as well as plenty of other roles where a degree (or extensive work experience) is a requirement.

    For example, I got an interview for Cancer Research for a job which required "a degree or substantial work experience". I didn't have the substantial work experience, so guess what got me the job?

    It remains that at many Russell and 1994 Group universities up to 80% of humanities graduates find a "graduate" job.

    However, I also recognise that we are saturated with graduates, especially humanities graduates, relative to the jobs available. But why shouldn't studying something for interest, and if it does lead to something else at a later date all the better? Just because a person's first role is in admin, it does not mean the they can enter a role later and their undergraduate degree acted as a platform.



    Why must a philosophy graduate by sceptical about their own sense of reality?

    I think a person will have the common sense to realise that, when in a work environment, they should remain focused on their current role and duties.
    The first job you mentioned would need extensive study and exp, the rest can be got with exp and no degree.
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    (Original post by ionaboner)
    Doing an applied degree such as nursing and medicine leads you into one career. Careers in arts/social sciences often are done for enjoyment for the person and the value of a degree itself. People who study sociology could go into any number of jobs but could a medical grad?
    I'm pretty sure they can. It's treated just like any other degree...
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    The first job you mentioned would need extensive study and exp, the rest can be got with exp and no degree.
    Did you even read the post? River even stated that for the geography-related jobs you'd need a masters degree. And he also mentioned graudate schemes... which is how a large proportion of students become employed. Clearly you can get into these jobs without a degree then :lol:
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    (Original post by ionaboner)
    Doing an applied degree such as nursing and medicine leads you into one career. Careers in arts/social sciences often are done for enjoyment for the person and the value of a degree itself. People who study sociology could go into any number of jobs but could a medical grad?
    I see you are on a boner :sexface:
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    (Original post by ivy45)
    I went with Economics because I'm equally interested in natural sciences, human sciences and languages and literature with a particular interest in maths - Economics seemed to offer the best of all worlds: Maths, a scientific approach, use of analytical and language skills, use of logic, something related to the real world...

    Also, job market wise all I considered was that Economics would enable me to work internationally...
    and also, as was genuinely said at my introductory seminar, economics leadz to money innit.
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    same problem I had, espicially as I had many interests, so picking a course wasn't as black and white for me, it wasn't like: I love X and would 100% hate to do other courses. For me, it was more like: I simply prefer X more than other courses in terms of personal interest.

    So i had this dilemma:

    doing a degree that I enjoy but will most likely lead to a random dull job due to not being able to beat the competition for the few jobs out there which are actually related to my degree


    vs


    doing a less enjoyable degree but will lead to a more exciting job than that random dull job which I would've most likely ended up if I picked the degree I enjoyed the most
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    I dout all the grads will get them jobs, Only a tiny minority might with*luck*
    And most those jobs you listed need further education masters and experience rs, etc..
    No..
    60% of Philosophers from the course that I have an offer for go on to pro/managerial professions after 3 months.
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    I don't understand why you'd choose to spend at least three years of your life doing a course you didn't enjoy purely because it'd get you a job at the end of it. If you don't enjoy it, you won't work as hard and consequently not do as well as you could if you were doing something you enjoyed.

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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    same problem I had, espicially as I had many interests, so picking a course wasn't as black and white for me, it wasn't like: I love X and would 100% hate to do other courses. For me, it was more like: I simply prefer X more than other courses in terms of personal interest.

    So i had this dilemma:

    doing a degree that I enjoy but will most likely lead to a random dull job due to not being able to beat the competition for the few jobs out there which are actually related to my degree


    vs


    doing a less enjoyable degree but will lead to a more exciting job than that random dull job which I would've most likely ended up if I picked the degree I enjoyed the most
    So which option did you go with?
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    (Original post by rageagainstessays)
    No..
    60% of Philosophers from the course that I have an offer for go on to pro/managerial professions after 3 months.
    Its just an offer. Its prolly a graduate job anyway.
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    Why do you think there are no job prospects for HR? A degree in HR can open up a ton of job prospects in most large companies and is very useful for many management roles.
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    From what I have seen, those who study HR, politics, sociology, psychology, neuroscience,philosophy, forensic science etc. Tend to study for the own personal fulfillment. Because in reality there are no jobs, for these courses. and if there ARE the jobmarket is so tiny that only the top notch people get them.

    Whereas courses like, dental technology, nursing, medicine, accounting, teaching, special education, computer science, are job specific, so grads know where they are going with them in life.

    I feel like that and I know its true. I personally put in a application for psychology and biology,bcos I like the subjects, but LIKING them isnt enough I guess, but I am gonna leave it, and do a proper course, cos in relality the above courses dont get YOU jobs!

    What do you guys think about this? IS it so?
    There are many jobs where specific degrees won't be any more beneficial than a general one. I want to go into advertising and marketing, but I'm doing a Psychology degree because not only is that a common subject for people in that career, it can also lead into several others if I change my mind.
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    Psychology grads are the most sought after.. They have both literary and numeracy skills that make them attractive to almost all employers. Not everybody knows exactly what they want to do with their life and I think doing something like a psychology degree is better than doing nothing or spending around £40000 to become a doctor and absolutely hate it. Fine, if you know you want to be a doctor/nurse/accountant or whatever, but if you don't it's probably best to keep your options open.
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    So which option did you go with?
    Went with the 2nd option

    I dunno though, might live to regret it. Its slightly more complicated with the fact that I don't really know what to do as a career. What about you, what would you choose?
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    The above course mentioned may not lead directly into a specific job but they definitely put you in better stead than other people without degrees. Furthermore university isn't just about completing your degree. They're are loads of opportunities such as volunteering that you should take advantage of to put you in even better stead than other people in the job market.

    And anyway, if you're interesting in sociology, for example, doing that degree is more likely to end you up in a job related to that degree. There's also the fact that people should do what they enjoy and learn for the sake of learning. We've all heard about people dropping out or changing from, say, law because it would what lead into a well-paid job.
 
 
 
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