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    Hi, I've got an offer from UCL and would love to go there, but the only thing putting me off is the cost.

    Would love to hear from some current/former students. Is it unbearably expensive? Any tips on saving money or general advice?

    Thanks in advance
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    student loans...then forget about it cos when you get your salary it will be paid for by taking a tiny percentage ...all in all...go for it
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    Hated UCL so much. Think carefully before applying there.
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    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    Hated UCL so much. Think carefully before applying there.
    Hi, thanks for replying.

    Can I ask what you didn't like?
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    *stalks thread* I've got my offer too and is seems the biggest thing for me too.
    Also the fact that I already live in London so applying for their accommodation might be tough.
    When I went there a Law student (who was our guide) said that its not so bad as most things around have student discounts and people seem to manage quite well... Biggest cost is accommodation obviously so I'm gonna look into that...


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    (Original post by Orenjichan)
    *stalks thread* I've got my offer too and is seems the biggest thing for me too.
    Also the fact that I already live in London so applying for their accommodation might be tough.
    When I went there a Law student (who was our guide) said that its not so bad as most things around have student discounts and people seem to manage quite well... Biggest cost is accommodation obviously so I'm gonna look into that...


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    Hi, nice to see someone in the same boat. Yeah, accommodation is so expensive but I guess you get higher grants. Having to move out of Halls after the first year scares me the most. Anyway, good luck with getting in, if you decide to go, and thanks for the reply
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    (Original post by LoopyLinguist)
    Hi, nice to see someone in the same boat. Yeah, accommodation is so expensive but I guess you get higher grants. Having to move out of Halls after the first year scares me the most. Anyway, good luck with getting in, if you decide to go, and thanks for the reply

    You have to move out of Halls after the first year? So basically second,third,fourth and so on years have to find private accommodation OUTSIDE of the university?
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    (Original post by DarkTitan)
    student loans...then forget about it cos when you get your salary it will be paid for by taking a tiny percentage ...all in all...go for it
    9% above 21k is still not 'tiny'. Student loans really aren't as trivial an affair as people on TSR parrot about. Being in 30k+ debt with 3%+ ROI is not a nice situation to be in.

    Just felt the need to say this, because nobody on this forum talks about it seroiusly.
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    (Original post by LoopyLinguist)
    Hi, nice to see someone in the same boat. Yeah, accommodation is so expensive but I guess you get higher grants. Having to move out of Halls after the first year scares me the most. Anyway, good luck with getting in, if you decide to go, and thanks for the reply

    This is from a completely personal perspective.

    My sister got 5 As at A level and went to UCL to study medics.
    The first year I started noticing a change in behaviour; locking herself away, working too hard for a first years.

    In the second year her grades went down so badly, the problem was she was getting no support and the teaching style was disgusting and said herself the Uni was 'overhyped'. There was a very large drop out rate which resulted in all her friends going to other Unis, but she moved to Kings and I haven't seen her happier.

    After this I quickly crossed out UCL from my list.


    That's not to you say you won't enjoy it, it could be your place, but do try out other unis, you know never know you may find the one that's truly right for you.
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    (Original post by kfarah13)
    You have to move out of Halls after the first year? So basically second,third,fourth and so on years have to find private accommodation OUTSIDE of the university?
    Yes, I think so :/
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    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    This is from a completely personal perspective.

    My sister got 5 As at A level and went to UCL to study medics.
    The first year I started noticing a change in behaviour; locking herself away, working too hard for a first years.

    In the second year her grades went down so badly, the problem was she was getting no support and the teaching style was disgusting and said herself the Uni was 'overhyped'. There was a very large drop out rate which resulted in all her friends going to other Unis, but she moved to Kings and I haven't seen her happier.

    After this I quickly crossed out UCL from my list.


    That's not to you say you won't enjoy it, it could be your place, but do try out other unis, you know never know you may find the one that's truly right for you.
    Hi, thank you. To be honest, UCL is not my first choice. It's such a prestigious university, but I know that's not everything. I've had an offer from Leeds, which I love; it wouldn't seem like such a massive step-up going there.
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    It's common for you to move out of halls at all unis. Housing in Camden however is around £150 a week before bills - my house in Southampton costs me £73 a week before bills. I had an offer from UCL for law and I too hated it, I had firmed it but missed my offer. I didn't like it from first viewing and I'm really glad I didn't get in. Regarding the cost anyway I believe you get an extra £1000 on your loan per year to help but it's still extortionate. However having UCL on your CV would be quite advantageous so it's up to you whether you think the cost is worth it
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    9% above 21k is still not 'tiny'. Student loans really aren't as trivial an affair as people on TSR parrot about. Being in 30k+ debt with 3%+ ROI is not a nice situation to be in.

    Just felt the need to say this, because nobody on this forum talks about it seroiusly.
    As someone under the old system (meaning mine is taken from earnings above 15k) and who has experienced the tax for my student loan, it is tiny and hardly impacts you. It is not actual debt as it is written off by the time you hit 50 and does not affect credit rating or mortgages or anything. Very few people actually pay off their student loan so ultimately the government loses money on a lot of them.

    Think of it this way, it's 9% of anything earnt over 21k, which means at 22k, you pay 9% of 1k, which is... 90 pounds. A year. That's all the money you will pay in one year if you earn 22k a year. So your monthly salary/wage will end up being somewhere between 7 and 8 pounds less than if you hadn't taken the loan. So really, it is quite trivial when you think about it. Or at least, that is how I have been taught the system.


    (Original post by kfarah13)
    You have to move out of Halls after the first year? So basically second,third,fourth and so on years have to find private accommodation OUTSIDE of the university?
    Yes, but given the massive number of students in London, it is relatively easy finding somewhere to live if you are in a group. The usual number is 3-5 students per flat, and then you decide on how much you can afford and go to the appropriate zone. It's not that bad. 2006-7 I lived in a four bedroom flat, with living room and small garden in Camden for around 450 a month, which was exceptionally good value for what we were getting, bills were not included. You will often find flats without living rooms in order to cut the rent.



    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    This is from a completely personal perspective.

    My sister got 5 As at A level and went to UCL to study medics.
    The first year I started noticing a change in behaviour; locking herself away, working too hard for a first years.

    In the second year her grades went down so badly, the problem was she was getting no support and the teaching style was disgusting and said herself the Uni was 'overhyped'. There was a very large drop out rate which resulted in all her friends going to other Unis, but she moved to Kings and I haven't seen her happier.

    After this I quickly crossed out UCL from my list.


    That's not to you say you won't enjoy it, it could be your place, but do try out other unis, you know never know you may find the one that's truly right for you.
    So despite never having experienced the university yourself and relying solely on your sister's testimony, you have decided you hate the place? Strong words for such weak support.

    Point 1: Medical students across the UK and the world generally work far harder than most and it is quite common for them to lock themselves away. Not a UCL thing.

    Point 2: Did she look for support? Last time I was at UCL, they had a very strong student support section. What was wrong with the teaching style that made it "disgusting"?

    Point 3: Medicine always has a high dropout rate, as do many of the top tier universities across the board. That's why they are top-tier, because they are demanding.

    I enjoyed UCL, personally. The services were good, strong support in my department, accommodation was decent. Central London so good for all those reasons. Expensive, but it is possible to get work that fits in around your studies, especially if you apply to UCLU or ULU, both of which are right beside the university.

    There are many reasons to dislike the place, but many reasons to like it as well.
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    (Original post by LoopyLinguist)
    Hi, I've got an offer from UCL and would love to go there, but the only thing putting me off is the cost.

    Would love to hear from some current/former students. Is it unbearably expensive? Any tips on saving money or general advice?

    Thanks in advance
    Budget and look into a part-time job; I work around 3hrs a week to make ends meet.
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    UCL offers a lot of support for struggling students, such as extra exam time, the ability to interrupt a year, 15% boosts on coursework, extensive free counselling/appointments with a wide range of behavioural experts (I went to a talk about this today ). As well as this they run 3 week courses during study leave about exam stress/anxiety, so don't let fear of no support put you off! Obviously not everybody accesses this support network, but it's definitely there if you should ever need it!

    On the money side, it's difficult but doable, food can be done quite cheaply and catered halls are about £20 a week more expensive, which might be worth it given that it covers all breakfasts and dinners. On the going out front there're some great student nights (Moonies, Loop, Proud, ULU) to keep prices down. If it's the course/city for you then don't let price put you off!

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    As someone under the old system (meaning mine is taking from earnings above 15k) and who has experienced the tax for my student loan, it is tiny and hardly impacts you. It is not actual debt as it is written off by the time you hit 50 and does not affect credit rating or mortgages or anything. Very few people actual pay off their student loan so ultimately the government loses money on a lot of them.

    Think of it this way, it's 9% of anything earnt over 21k, which means at 22k, you pay 9% of 1k, which is... 90 pounds. A year. That's all the money you will pay in one year if you earn 22k a year. So your monthly salary/wage will end up being somewhere between 7 and 8 pounds less than if you hadn't taken the loan. So really, it is quite trivial when you think about it. Or at least, that is how I have been taught the system.
    My older siblings are also under the old system, with significantly less debt than I'll be in, and they do feel it. I understand it isn't the same kind of debt as a bank loan, and more of a tax - but people complain about tax for a reason. You chose one example which I feel is slightly misleading, in that graduates generally won't expect to be on 22k for 30 years.

    Of course, we have to pay for education here whether we like it or not. All I'm saying is that students shouldn't necessarily borrow the max they can, just because people say 9% over 21k isn't a lot and many won't pay it back. And that having a cut taken out of your paycheck constantly for 30 years will get annoying: in the earlier stages when you have little left after tax, rent, utilities, saving for a deposit, etc., and in the latter stages when your repayments and tax increase with your salary, you have a mortgage, children, etc.

    Options such as studying abroad where tuition fees are nearer 0, living at home, and getting a job alongside your degree should be considered (but I've seen them completely overlooked due to the perception that repayments are negligible). For lower earners this might be the case, but someone with a good degree from UCL can earn enough for higher borrowing to lead to a lot higher repayments.
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    UCL is expensive as ****. Halls are £160-190 per week, getting a bite to eat is expensive as hell in Central London, travel is expensive as hell in Central London etc etc
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    (Original post by LoopyLinguist)
    Hi, I've got an offer from UCL and would love to go there, but the only thing putting me off is the cost.

    Would love to hear from some current/former students. Is it unbearably expensive? Any tips on saving money or general advice?

    Thanks in advance
    The loan they give you wont be enough trust me. Its bloody expensive living here, and the rent I pay is expensive even for a sh**ty flat
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    Being at Queen Mary, I relish the opportunity to pay relatively inexpensive East London prices for both my MSc tuition and my accommodation - at a university where I'm middling in intelligence instead of near the bottom; yet at the same time this is all in addition to having unlimited 24-7 access to the main UCL building and library (not to mention the Senate House Library, as well as all the other University of London colleges.)

    What's more, I graduate with a University of London degree.

    Win-win, as far as I'm concerned. It's like going to the 4th best university in the world when you're actually not.
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    9% above 21k is still not 'tiny'. Student loans really aren't as trivial an affair as people on TSR parrot about. Being in 30k+ debt with 3%+ ROI is not a nice situation to be in.

    Just felt the need to say this, because nobody on this forum talks about it seroiusly.
    It is only about £36 per week, obviously it would be better to not have to pay that but it doesn't seem like much to me


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