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Is it possible for a planet the size of Jupiter to be as habitable as Earth? Watch

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    - So, let's have hypothetical Planet G.

    - Planet G is some 2 million light years away in some far off galaxy.

    - It is roughly the size of our own Jupiter (so, roughly 1300 Earths can fit in it, as they can fit in Jupiter).


    Now, can Planet G be habitable, provided it's in the exact same zone (Goldilocks) in its own star system as Earth is in our own solar system?

    Hence, if humans/humanoids lived on this planet (if it is habitable), it will be able to support upwards of 500 billion -1+trillion of them, no? (Bear in mind, that in the best case scenario, Earth can comfortably support 100+billion if distribution and environmental and climate problems are effectively solved).

    Thoughts from any informed posters?
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    Well, humans would have difficulty coping with the large gravity on a planet like Jupiter (although size does not necessarily correspond to gravity).
    But I don't see any reason why a race of aliens couldn't, provided it had water, an atmosphere, etc.
    Really, we've never found alien life, so what it could survive on is a bit of a mystery.
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    I don't think a rocky planet can exist at that size to begin with?

    As for microbial life, it could be possible that layers of jupiters atmosphere harbour life.
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    Why are humans even thinking about if there's life outside Earth. We're so cocky and we think we know it all. It's pretty much obvious that its not just us in the universe


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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    Why are humans even thinking about if there's life outside Earth. We're so cocky and we think we know it all. It's pretty much obvious that its not just us in the universe


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    I beg your pardon?

    I seek to find out if a mightily large planet of a habitable environment exists - nowhere did I say that humans were the only intelligent life to exist; on the contrary, the sheer size of the cosmos would not allow it!
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    (Original post by Mockery)
    I don't think a rocky planet can exist at that size to begin with?

    As for microbial life, it could be possible that layers of jupiters atmosphere harbour life.
    Is that due to physics or just due to your own whim?

    In other words, such a mightily large planet could exist and still be Earth-like in environment, yet not at all harm the laws of physics and the laws of the universe?
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    Sure but it would be gaseous. Life forms would therefore be air sacs.
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    (Redacted: Jupiter has a gravitational field strength 2.53 times the strength of earth's so any life there would have to expend at least 2.53 times the energy we do for ordinary movement. This might not sound a lot, but you have to bear in mind that we use a huge amount of energy each day simply to battle against the force of gravity, we just don't think of it as work, so the 2.53 multiplier adds up to a lot more energy. Therefore, for advanced life to evolve on a large planet they would either have to have a very high metabolism, not move a lot, or have a very low profile body. Having said that, whilst this arguably makes it more difficult for life to evolve on a larger planet, it certainly doesn't prohibit it.)

    I don't agree that Earth can support 100 billion people though. Whilst this might be hypothetically true if everyone lived on crops that are extremely energy efficient, lived on fewer calories per day with next to no consumerism, this is obviously completely unrealistic and isn't going to happen in the near future. Despite what some people who are desperate to hang on to their attractive models of infinite economic growth and development say, our planet is already overpopulated.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Sure but it would be gaseous. Life forms would therefore be air sacs.
    (Original post by Mockery)
    I don't think a rocky planet can exist at that size to begin with?
    (Redacted (It is true):That's not true. You're assuming our Solar System is the platonic model for the rest of the universe. Astronomers have found plenty of rocky exoplanets that are greater than the size of Jupiter.)
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    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    Jupiter has a gravitational field strength 2.53 times the strength of earth's so any life there would have to expend at least 2.53 times the energy we do for ordinary movement. This might not sound a lot, but you have to bear in mind that we use a huge amount of energy each day simply to battle against the force of gravity, we just don't think of it as work, so the 2.53 multiplier adds up to a lot more energy. Therefore, for advanced life to evolve on a large planet they would either have to have a very high metabolism, not move a lot, or have a very low profile body. Having said that, whilst this arguably makes it more difficult for life to evolve on a larger planet, it certainly doesn't prohibit it.

    I don't agree that Earth can support 100 billion people though. Whilst this might be hypothetically true if everyone lived on crops that are extremely energy efficient, lived on fewer calories per day with next to no consumerism, this is obviously completely unrealistic and isn't going to happen in the near future. Despite what some people who are desperate to hang on to their attractive models of infinite economic growth and development say, our planet is already overpopulated.
    Not being funny but where's your proof that Jupiter has a gravitational field 2.53 times more than Earth.


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    (Original post by HumanSupremacist)
    Is that due to physics or just due to your own whim?

    In other words, such a mightily large planet could exist and still be Earth-like in environment, yet not at all harm the laws of physics and the laws of the universe?
    It's more observation and theoretical implications of such a huge planet if it was rocky. Such a large mass would be bordering the mass of a brown dwarf star.

    Simply not enough is known about planet formation however, but at the moment 14 times the mass of Earth is considered the potential limit.
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    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    That's not true. You're assuming our Solar System is the platonic model for the rest of the universe. Astronomers have found plenty of rocky exoplanets that are greater than the size of Jupiter.
    Really? Care to add a link or two?
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    No. My old enemy gravity has seen to that.

    CURSE YOU GRAVITY.
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    I'd say the gravitational force would be too great - atleast for creatures of our proportions/strength.
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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    Not being funny but where's your proof that Jupiter has a gravitational field 2.53 times more than Earth.


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    ...

    Jupiter's gravity is 24.79ms^-1. Earth's gravity is 9.81ms^10. 25.79/9.81=2.53. You could've googled this before begging for proof.

    (Original post by Mockery)
    Really? Care to add a link or two?
    Just looking now...
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    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    Jupiter has a gravitational field strength 2.53 times the strength of earth's so any life there would have to expend at least 2.53 times the energy we do for ordinary movement. This might not sound a lot, but you have to bear in mind that we use a huge amount of energy each day simply to battle against the force of gravity, we just don't think of it as work, so the 2.53 multiplier adds up to a lot more energy. Therefore, for advanced life to evolve on a large planet they would either have to have a very high metabolism, not move a lot, or have a very low profile body. Having said that, whilst this arguably makes it more difficult for life to evolve on a larger planet, it certainly doesn't prohibit it.
    There's also the fact that if a planet the size of jupiter had the density of earth, it's gravitational strength would be a LOT more than 2.53 times ours.

    But still, the sentence in bold still applies
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    (Original post by Arturo Bandini)
    There's also the fact that if a planet the size of jupiter had the density of earth, it's gravitational strength would be a LOT more than 2.53 times ours.

    But still, the sentence in bold still applies
    That's a very valid point which I didn't think about.


    (Original post by Mockery)
    Really? Care to add a link or two?
    I have to redact what I said, I can't find any examples of rocky planets greater than jupiter. However, I have found several articles talking about rocky exoplanets near the size of jupiter (here's a full list of exoplanets) and the impression I've received from these articles is that the absence of larger rocky planets is due to the difficulty of detecting them in comparison to gasseous planets.
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    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    ...

    Jupiter's gravity is 24.79ms^-1. Earth's gravity is 9.81ms^10. 25.79/9.81=2.53. You could've googled this before begging for proof.
    My point is, where's the proof that Jupiter's gravity is 24.79ms^-1
    Which tests show this


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    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    I have to redact what I said, I can't find any examples of rocky planets greater than jupiter. However, I have found several articles talking about rocky exoplanets near the size of jupiter (here's a full list of exoplanets) and the impression I've received from these articles is that the absence of larger rocky planets is due to the difficulty of detecting them in comparison to gasseous planets.
    Looking at several of the entries to that list that are of a larger mass to jupiter, they all tend to also be larger in diameter. Surely a potentially rocky planet nearly the size of jupiter would have an astronomically large mass?
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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    My point is, where's the proof that Jupiter's gravity is 24.79ms^-1
    Which tests show this


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    Seriously? The formula to calculate gravitational field strength is GM/(r^2) where G is the gravitational constant, M is the mass and r is the radius. Plug the numbers in and you get 24.79ms^-1. If you don't believe that formula, fine, but don't expect to be taken seriously in a scientific argument...
 
 
 
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