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    (Original post by becki1982)
    You get paid a decent salary for a degree (and PGCE) and you also get a lot of holidays!

    The pay structure is very attractive. If you have ambition and willing to work hard in a few years you can get deputy or head of department, that will get you around £45k then once you enter the management system within the schools you can get around £60k.

    Then get to head teacher and well anything from £90k+

    You can progress very quick if you are dedicated too
    Would you say the opportunities of progressing in such a way is the same for primary teachers?
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    and breathe....
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    So that there are less people who write things like "why do everyone wants to".
    😂 Hilarious!
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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    ������ Hilarious!
    If some people had bothered to read the entire thread they would have noticed the OP stating his grammar difficulties were due to dyslexia. How sad that the next generation of 'inspiring' teachers are so incredibly quick to pass insult and judgement.

    In answer to the original post, I believe all children deserve the opportunity to be nurtured and helped to fulfill their potential. I wish to be the person who does that to the highest standard possible.
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    (Original post by shellouf)
    If some people had bothered to read the entire thread they would have noticed the OP stating his grammar difficulties were due to dyslexia. How sad that the next generation of 'inspiring' teachers are so incredibly quick to pass insult and judgement.

    In answer to the original post, I believe all children deserve the opportunity to be nurtured and helped to fulfill their potential. I wish to be the person who does that to the highest standard possible.
    I wasn't laughing at the OP's thread title but more at the way the pair I quoted was put.
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    (Original post by shellouf)
    If some people had bothered to read the entire thread they would have noticed the OP stating his grammar difficulties were due to dyslexia. How sad that the next generation of 'inspiring' teachers are so incredibly quick to pass insult and judgement.

    In answer to the original post, I believe all children deserve the opportunity to be nurtured and helped to fulfill their potential. I wish to be the person who does that to the highest standard possible.
    I'm not an aspiring teacher, but also forgive me if I'm wrong but I have been told that dyslexia affects spelling and writing, e.g. writing a b rather than a d. Not the grammar, which is the issue with the title. Maybe it affects people differently.
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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    Would you say the opportunities of progressing in such a way is the same for primary teachers?
    I have been told (by teachers) that secondary education leads to a lot more promotion (and chances of it) than primary education. If you want the benefits of teaching (rewarding, holidays) with decent pay, go into secondary, and hope to become head of something!


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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I'm not an aspiring teacher, but also forgive me if I'm wrong but I have been told that dyslexia affects spelling and writing, e.g. writing a b rather than a d. Not the grammar, which is the issue with the title. Maybe it affects people differently.
    http://staff.napier.ac.uk/services/s...ficulties.aspx
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    (Original post by Mr Advice)
    Would you say the opportunities of progressing in such a way is the same for primary teachers?
    Well, a woman in my French evening class had an interview to be Assistant Headteacher at a primary in Staffordshire last week, and she's only 29. There are fewer rungs on the ladder in primary, I think.
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    So I can educate children on the different forms of the auxiliary verb 'do'.
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    Teaching is already quite a competitive career choice. I've decided against my original desires to go into teaching because the competition makes a wide opening for newly qualified teachers to be exploited. No thanks!
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    I'd rather gouge my eyes out that step foot back in to school, let alone work in one.
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    stable employment when you gain it, fabulous holidays and working hours, decent salary, good prospects of promotion.


    (Original post by TheJoshwha)
    I have been told (by teachers) that secondary education leads to a lot more promotion (and chances of it) than primary education. If you want the benefits of teaching (rewarding, holidays) with decent pay, go into secondary, and hope to become head of something!


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    i agree with this, secondary teachers are generally paid more due to their specialisation and secondary schools schools are larger so more room for promotion e.g. faculty head
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    I've experienced the opposite. Many want to be doctors, lawyers, actors or porn moguls.
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    Because it's the only job anyone with a generic arts degree has a hope of getting into.
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    (Original post by deedee123)
    working hours, decent salary
    Ha! I disagree very strongly about these 2 points!



    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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    (Original post by myblueheaven339)
    Ha! I disagree very strongly about these 2 points!



    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    faculty heads earn 40K in my school for working 38 weeks a year.

    Having every weekend off is what i'd class as "good working hours". I know various teachers that are always doing stuff at the weekend.
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    (Original post by deedee123)
    faculty heads earn 40K in my school for working 38 weeks a year.

    Having every weekend off is what i'd class as "good working hours". I know various teachers that are always doing stuff at the weekend.
    I wouldn't call approx 40 hours a week in school, plus 1-2 hours each evening and a further 5-10 at the weekend good hours. And that's on a good week!


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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    (Original post by Miss Jean Brodie)
    Well, a woman in my French evening class had an interview to be Assistant Headteacher at a primary in Staffordshire last week, and she's only 29. There are fewer rungs on the ladder in primary, I think.
    Depends how good you are. If you are consistently rated outstanding from observations and by the 'god' ofsted than you could make deputy head about 4 years after qualifying. It's all about how good your observations are, how fast you can get your kids up the levels, and your ambition, in primary. I know less about secondary but there are a lot more levels of management I think.
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    Actual lesson time is less than 25 hours a week, surely. So the spare time spent there can be spent on marking, to reduce time on marking over weekend.

    Obviously essay subjects ad science subjects would have different hours amounts. Maths teachers are paid the most (allegedly) for secondary teachers, and do barely any hours a week! Even my old teachers admit that they do not do that much in extra time.


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