bestofyou
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Seems to have the least intense mathematical content of all disciplines from what I gathered via google or uni entry requirements.

Would it limit my career options more than say a degree in EE?

Would there be any need for SE graduates in the likes of renewables or bionics?

Is it really engineering or just a degree with engineering thrown in there like Furniture Rearranging Engineering?

I think I would enjoy it more than an EE course and probably do better due to EE having such an intense level of mathematics, but wouldn't be prepared to give up my EE place for some Micky Mouse course that gets me nowhere other than stuck in an office staring at wall after wall of coding. Is there a possibility of outdoors work with SE?

Thanks
Tasquantum


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Joinedup
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To get into those sorts of jobs I suggest electrical and electronic engineering. Software engineering has come to mean applying watered down engineering principles to commercial data processing.

If you want to write software that controls wind turbines or bionic limbs, see if you can find an ee course with modules on embedded systems or real time systems.

Imo.
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bestofyou
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(Original post by Joinedup)
To get into those sorts of jobs I suggest electrical and electronic engineering. Software engineering has come to mean applying watered down engineering principles to commercial data processing.

If you want to write software that controls wind turbines or bionic limbs, see if you can find an ee course with modules on embedded systems or real time systems.

Imo.
Yeah my school would offer ES alongside Electronics, but I'm just not sure that I could do well on an electronics course due to the maths. Seems there are horror stories about engineering maths and particularly electrical/electronics all over the Internet.


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miser
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I did BSc Software Engineering and I can tell you that industry does not view it as a 'micky mouse' subject.

Source: was hired by CERN and GE.
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kka25
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(Original post by bestofyou)
Seems to have the least intense mathematical content of all disciplines from what I gathered via google or uni entry requirements.

Would it limit my career options more than say a degree in EE?

Would there be any need for SE graduates in the likes of renewables or bionics?

Is it really engineering or just a degree with engineering thrown in there like Furniture Rearranging Engineering?

I think I would enjoy it more than an EE course and probably do better due to EE having such an intense level of mathematics, but wouldn't be prepared to give up my EE place for some Micky Mouse course that gets me nowhere other than stuck in an office staring at wall after wall of coding. Is there a possibility of outdoors work with SE?

Thanks
Tasquantum


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I did Computer Science, and no way SE is a "mickey mouse" subject.
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mikeyd85
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(Original post by miser)
I did BSc Software Engineering and I can tell you that industry does not view it as a 'micky mouse' subject.

Source: was hired by CERN and GE.
You worked at CERN!?

Wow! Awesome!
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miser
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(Original post by mikeyd85)
You worked at CERN!?

Wow! Awesome!
It was where I did my industrial placement. I worked as part of the CMS project.
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mikeyd85
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(Original post by miser)
It was where I did my industrial placement. I worked as part of the CMS project.
:eek: Kudos sir. That's a phenomenal thing to have on a CV.
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bestofyou
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(Original post by miser)
I did BSc Software Engineering and I can tell you that industry does not view it as a 'micky mouse' subject.

Source: was hired by CERN and GE.
What uni did you go to? Was your degree accredited? One of the ones I was looking at is a BEng and isn't accredited.

Was there much maths in your course?


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miser
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(Original post by bestofyou)
What uni did you go to? Was your degree accredited? One of the ones I was looking at is a BEng and isn't accredited.

Was there much maths in your course?


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UWE and it was accredited. No, most of the maths was in the first year and it was discrete only.

In hindsight I would have preferred to have studied computer science (at say Bristol) because I would have preferred the more technical content. Software engineering covers a lot of software lifecycles and methodologies which I didn't find particularly engaging.
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bestofyou
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(Original post by miser)
UWE and it was accredited. No, most of the maths was in the first year and it was discrete only.

In hindsight I would have preferred to have studied computer science (at say Bristol) because I would have preferred the more technical content. Software engineering covers a lot of software lifecycles and methodologies which I didn't find particularly engaging.
Who was it accredited by? Would opting for a non-accredited course limit career options?

Is outdoors work unlikely with such a degree?


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miser
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(Original post by bestofyou)
Who was it accredited by? Would opting for a non-accredited course limit career options?

Is outdoors work unlikely with such a degree?


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BCS (British Computing Society). No, I don't think so - I never mentioned on my CV that it was accredited.

Not sure about outdoors work, I suppose it's what kind of job you can wrangle, but I don't know any software engineers with outdoor work.
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kka25
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(Original post by bestofyou)
Is outdoors work unlikely with such a degree?
It depends on the software developer's scope.

A mate of mine needs to travel to places such as server rooms of a courthouse, etc.
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a10
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(Original post by kka25)
It depends on the software developer's scope.

A mate of mine needs to travel to places such as server rooms of a courthouse, etc.
:lol:
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Joinedup
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At one of my prev jobs they sent a software guy out to oil platforms to commission the kit (fire and gas alarm systems). I always managed to dodge it.

Presumably if you're doing formula one car control software you get to travel the world perving at grid girls when you're not being shouted at because the car's too slow.
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Juichiro
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(Original post by miser)
UWE and it was accredited. No, most of the maths was in the first year and it was discrete only.

In hindsight I would have preferred to have studied computer science (at say Bristol) because I would have preferred the more technical content. Software engineering covers a lot of software lifecycles and methodologies which I didn't find particularly engaging.
Do you use any of the maths you learned in your job? Do you use discrete maths (in particular set theory) to write formal specifications?
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miser
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(Original post by Juichiro)
Do you use any of the maths you learned in your job? Do you use discrete maths (in particular set theory) to write formal specifications?
No, not at all.

I'd guess that most software engineers don't use discrete maths directly - I think the point in being taught it is to provide a foundation in the theory underpinning software.
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Juichiro
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(Original post by miser)
No, not at all.

I'd guess that most software engineers don't use discrete maths directly - I think the point in being taught it is to provide a foundation in the theory underpinning software.
Thanks for the info, miser. Why did you say that you would have preferred doing Computer Science at Bristol?
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miser
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(Original post by Juichiro)
Thanks for the info, miser. Why did you say that you would have preferred doing Computer Science at Bristol?
I say that because I enjoyed the technical side of the course much more than learning about methodologies, software lifecycles and business. I would have rathered to do more maths and more coding. I think I also would've enjoyed doing it at a more reputable and well-established uni.
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yo radical one
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Not at all.

It was my understanding that SE graduates generally have an easier time finding employment than CS ones.
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