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    Do we have to know this for OCR A2 chemistry:

    the earliest examples of stereoisomerism involved Co3+ complex ions. In 1889, Sophus Mads Jorgenson, a Danish scientist, observed that some complex ions could form salts that had different colours.

    Chemistry tends to name drop alot in the textbooks but I never learn the names but I'm worried it might be different in A2 and that we actually do need to know the names now.
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    (Original post by celina10)
    Do we have to know this for OCR A2 chemistry:

    the earliest examples of stereoisomerism involved Co3+ complex ions. In 1889, Sophus Mads Jorgenson, a Danish scientist, observed that some complex ions could form salts that had different colours.

    Chemistry tends to name drop alot in the textbooks but I never learn the names but I'm worried it might be different in A2 and that we actually do need to know the names now.
    Do not learn the names unless you want to!
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    (Original post by celina10)
    Do we have to know this for OCR A2 chemistry:

    the earliest examples of stereoisomerism involved Co3+ complex ions. In 1889, Sophus Mads Jorgenson, a Danish scientist, observed that some complex ions could form salts that had different colours.

    Chemistry tends to name drop alot in the textbooks but I never learn the names but I'm worried it might be different in A2 and that we actually do need to know the names now.
    There are some rules named after chemists (e.g. Markovnikovs rule), but you don't really even need to know the name so long as you know the rule.
    You definitely won't need to remember any names like this.
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    (Original post by JMaydom)
    There are some rules named after chemists (e.g. Markovnikovs rule), but you don't really even need to know the name so long as you know the rule.
    You definitely won't need to remember any names like this.
    I think Markovnikov is one of the few you do need to know for A level mark schemes. Potentially also Arrhenius/Bronsted-Lowry/Lewis as well when it comes to acid/base theory.
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    (Original post by illusionz)
    I think Markovnikov is one of the few you do need to know for A level mark schemes. Potentially also Arrhenius/Bronsted-Lowry/Lewis as well when it comes to acid/base theory.
    Yeah, but you could probably get away with just knowing the result for markovnikovs rule. (not for the acid theory though as they will want the different definitions named)
 
 
 
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